2015 Niger raid

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2015 Niger raid
Part of the Islamist insurgency in West Africa
Militaire nigériens contre Boko Haram, mars 2015..jpg
Niger Army soldiers with a killed Boko Haram fighter in Diffa after the raid
Date6 February 2015[1]
LocationBosso and Diffa, Niger[1]
Result Nigerien victory
Belligerents
 Niger
 Chad[1]
Supported by:
 Canada[2]

Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant

Commanders and leaders
Chad Yaya Daoud (WIA)[1] Abubakar Shekau
Casualties and losses
4 killed
17 injured[1]
Dozens killed[1]
Several civilians killed[1]

The 2015 Niger raid was an unsuccessful assault on the Nigerien towns Bosso and Diffa, perpetrated by Boko Haram. The incident occurred on 6 February 2015, marking the first major Boko Haram incursion into Niger.

Background[edit]

In June 2013, between 5,000 and 10,000 refugees arrived in Bosso, fleeing fighting between Boko Haram and the Nigerian Armed Forces in Borno State of Nigeria. Most blamed the military for the excessive violence and human rights violations.[3]

The border town of Diffa is separated from Nigeria by the Komadougou Yobe river, a recent drop in the river's water level granted large groups of Nigerian refugees the opportunity to flee rebel controlled areas into the yet unaffected Niger.[1]

On 5 February 2015, a Nigerien parliament spokesman announced that discussions will be held regarding Niger's participation in the anti Boko Haram military operations.[1]

Raid[edit]

In the morning of 6 February 2015, Boko Haram militants carried out an assault on the Nigerien towns of Bosso and Diffa, after crossing into Niger from neighboring Nigeria. The Nigerien military successfully repelled the attacks with the aid of Chadian troops that have been stationed in Bosso since 2 February, the Chadian airforce also played a supporting role in the clashes. Dozens of militants were killed as Boko Haram retreated back into its stronghold in Nigeria. Nigerien casualties amounted to 4 killed, plus several civilians as well as 17 wounded.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "'109 Boko Haram fighters dead' after first attack on Niger". AFP. 6 February 2015. Retrieved 7 February 2015. 
  2. ^ Pugliese, David (February 11, 2015). "Special forces from Petawawa close to fighting as Niger battles Boko Haram". 
  3. ^ Nossiter, Adam (5 June 2013). "In Nigeria, 'Killing People Without Asking Who They Are'". New York Times. Retrieved 6 June 2013. 

Coordinates: 13°41′50″N 13°18′37″E / 13.6972°N 13.3103°E / 13.6972; 13.3103