2015 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship

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2015 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship
Tournament details
Host country  Israel
Dates 15–27 July 2015
Teams 8 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s) 4 (in 4 host cities)
Final positions
Champions  Sweden (3rd title)
Runners-up  Spain
Tournament statistics
Matches played 15
Goals scored 39 (2.6 per match)
Attendance 18,603 (1,240 per match)
Top scorer(s) Sweden Stina Blackstenius (6 goals)
Best player Sweden Stina Blackstenius
2014
2016

The 2015 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship was the 14th edition of the UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship (18th edition if the Under-18 era is included), the annual European youth football competition contested by the women's under-19 national teams of the member associations of UEFA. Israel hosted the tournament.[1] Players born on or after 1 January 1996 were eligible to participate in this competition.

Same as previous editions held in odd-numbered years, the tournament acted as the UEFA qualifiers for the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup. The four semi-finalists qualified for the 2016 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup in Papua New Guinea as the UEFA representatives.[2]

Qualification[edit]

A total of 48 UEFA nations entered the competition, and with the hosts Israel qualifying automatically, the other 47 teams competed in the qualifying competition to determine the remaining seven spots in the final tournament. The qualifying competition consisted of two rounds: Qualifying round, which took place in autumn 2014, and Elite round, which took place in spring 2015.[3]

Qualified teams[edit]

The following eight teams qualified for the final tournament.[4][5]

Note: All appearance statistics include only U-19 era (since 2002).

Team Method of qualification Finals appearance Last appearance Previous best performance
 Israel Hosts 1st Debut Debut
 Spain Elite round Group 1 winners 10th 2014 Champions (2004)
 Sweden Elite round Group 2 winners 9th 2014 Champions (2012)
 France Elite round Group 3 winners 11th 2013 Champions (2003, 2010, 2013)
 England Elite round Group 4 winners 11th 2014 Champions (2009)
 Norway Elite round Group 4 runners-up[^] 10th 2014 Runners-up (2003, 2008, 2011)
 Germany Elite round Group 5 winners 12th 2013 Champions (2002, 2006, 2007, 2011)
 Denmark Elite round Group 6 winners 6th 2013 Semi-finals (2002, 2006, 2012)

Notes

  1. ^ The best runners-up among all six elite round groups qualified for the final tournament.

Final draw[edit]

The final draw was held in Haifa, Israel on 20 May 2015, 20:15 IDT (UTC+3).[6][7] The eight teams were drawn into two groups of four teams. There were no seeding except that the hosts Israel were assigned to position A1 in the draw.

Venues[edit]

The matches were played at four venues in four host cities.[8]

Netanya Rishon LeZion
Netanya Stadium Haberfeld Stadium
Capacity: 13,610 Capacity: 6,000
Netanya-Stadium 33.JPG Haberfeld Stadium18.jpg
Lod Ramla
Lod Municipal Stadium Ramla Municipal Stadium
Capacity: 3,000 Capacity: 2,000
Blank 50px.png Blank 50px.png

Squads[edit]

Each national team had to submit a squad of 18 players.[3]

Match officials[edit]

A total of 6 referees, 8 assistant referees and 2 fourth officials were appointed for the final tournament.[9]

Group stage[edit]

Group winners and runners-up advanced to the semi-finals and qualified for the 2016 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup.

Tiebreakers

if two or more teams were equal on points on completion of the group matches, the following tie-breaking criteria were applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings:[3]

  1. Higher number of points obtained in the group matches played among the teams in question;
  2. Superior goal difference resulting from the group matches played among the teams in question;
  3. Higher number of goals scored in the group matches played among the teams in question;
  4. If, after having applied criteria 1 to 3, teams still had an equal ranking, criteria 1 to 3 were reapplied exclusively to the group matches between the teams in question to determine their final rankings. If this procedure did not lead to a decision, criteria 5 to 9 applied;
  5. Superior goal difference in all group matches;
  6. Higher number of goals scored in all group matches;
  7. If only two teams had the same number of points, and they were tied according to criteria 1 to 6 after having met in the last round of the group stage, their rankings were determined by a penalty shoot-out (not used if more than two teams had the same number of points, or if their rankings were not relevant for qualification for the next stage).
  8. Lower disciplinary points total based only on yellow and red cards received in the group matches (red card = 3 points, yellow card = 1 point, expulsion for two yellow cards in one match = 3 points);
  9. Drawing of lots.

All times were local, IDT (UTC+3).

Group A[edit]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  France 3 3 0 0 6 0 +6 9 Advance to knockout stage
2016 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup
2  Sweden 3 2 0 1 4 1 +3 6
3  Denmark 3 1 0 2 2 3 −1 3
4  Israel (H) 3 0 0 3 1 9 −8 0
Source: UEFA
(H) Host.
France 1–0 Denmark
Léger Goal 49' Report
Attendance: 400[9]
Referee: Ana Minić (Serbia)
Israel 0–3 Sweden
Report Björn Goal 22'
Blackstenius Goal 28'72'
Attendance: 2,500[9]
Referee: Rhona Daly (Republic of Ireland)

Sweden 1–0 Denmark
Angeldal Goal 35' (pen.) Report
Attendance: 250[9]
Referee: Lorraine Clark (Scotland)
Israel 0–4 France
Report Mateo Goal 10'
Carage Goal 26'
Gathrat Goal 63'
Léger Goal 90'
Attendance: 2,630[9]
Referee: Lina Lehtovaara (Finland)

Denmark 2–1 Israel
Sørensen Goal 33'60' Report Avital Goal 22'
Attendance: 2,300[9]
Referee: Eleni Lampadariou (Greece)
Sweden 0–1 France
Report Andersson Goal 5' (o.g.)
Attendance: 600[9]
Referee: Rhona Daly (Republic of Ireland)

Group B[edit]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Germany 3 2 0 1 3 3 0 6[a] Advance to knockout stage
2016 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup
2  Spain 3 2 0 1 7 2 +5 6[a]
3  Norway 3 1 1 1 2 4 −2 4
4  England 3 0 1 2 2 5 −3 1
Source: UEFA
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Ranked by head-to-head result (Germany 1–0 Spain)
England 1–2 Germany
George Goal 30' Report Ehegötz Goal 25'
Knaak Goal 87'
Attendance: 300[9]
Referee: Lina Lehtovaara (Finland)
Spain 4–0 Norway
Redondo Goal 22'83'
Nahikari Goal 26'
Garrote Goal 38'
Report
Attendance: 180[9]
Referee: Esther Azzopardi (Malta)

England 1–3 Spain
Flint Goal 9' Report Garrote Goal 54'
Redondo Goal 82'
Gálvez Goal 90'
Attendance: 300[9]
Referee: Eleni Lampadariou (Greece)
Germany 0–2 Norway
Report Fjelldal Goal 5'
Knaak Goal 33' (o.g.)
Attendance: 200[9]
Referee: Ana Minić (Serbia)

Norway 0–0 England
Report
Attendance: 200[9]
Referee: Esther Azzopardi (Malta)
Germany 1–0 Spain
Gálvez Goal 39' (o.g.) Report
Attendance: 400[9]
Referee: Lorraine Clark (Scotland)

Knockout stage[edit]

In the knockout stage, extra time and penalty shoot-out were used to decide the winner if necessary.[3]

Bracket[edit]

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
24 July – Lod
 
 
 France1 (4)
 
27 July – Netanya
 
 Spain (p)1 (5)
 
 Spain1
 
24 July – Netanya
 
 Sweden3
 
 Germany3 (2)
 
 
 Sweden (p)3 (4)
 

Semi-finals[edit]

Germany 3–3 (a.e.t.) Sweden
Knaak Goal 12'
Ehegötz Goal 58'
Gier Goal 78'
Report Almqvist Goal 21'
Blackstenius Goal 44'88'
Penalties
Knaak Penalty scored
Gier Penalty missed
Rauch Penalty missed
Gaugigl Penalty scored
2–4 Penalty scored Angeldal
Penalty scored Björn
Penalty scored Blackstenius
Penalty scored Blomqvist
Attendance: 680[9]
Referee: Esther Azzopardi (Malta)

France 1–1 (a.e.t.) Spain
Léger Goal 36' Report Sánchez Goal 42'
Penalties
Greboval Penalty scored
Lahmari Penalty scored
Karchaoui Penalty scored
Romanelli Penalty scored
Léger Penalty missed
4–5 Penalty scored Domínguez
Penalty scored Hernández
Penalty scored Ortega
Penalty scored Beltrán
Penalty scored García
Attendance: 433[9]
Referee: Rhona Daly (Republic of Ireland)

Final[edit]

Spain 1–3 Sweden
Hernández Goal 81' Report Blackstenius Goal 28'36'
Angeldal Goal 89'
Attendance: 7,230[9]
Referee: Lina Lehtovaara (Finland)

Goalscorers[edit]

6 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal
Own goals

Source: UEFA.com[10]

Team of the tournament[edit]

Source: UEFA.com[11]

Golden player: Sweden Stina Blackstenius[12]

Qualified teams for FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup[edit]

The following four teams from UEFA qualified for the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup.[13]

Team Qualified on Previous appearances in tournament1
 Sweden 18 July 2015 1 (2010)
 Spain 21 July 2015 1 (2004)
 France 18 July 2015 5 (2002, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2014)
 Germany 21 July 2015 7 (2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012, 2014)
1 Bold indicates champion for that year. Italic indicates host for that year.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Norway, Israel, Slovakia to host Women's U19s". UEFA.com. 20 March 2012.
  2. ^ "Decisions taken by the FIFA Executive Committee concerning women's competitions in 2016" (PDF). FIFA. 23 June 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d "Regulations of the UEFA European Women's Under-19 Championship, 2014/15" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  4. ^ "England and Norway complete finals lineup". UEFA.com. 9 April 2015.
  5. ^ "2015 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship programme" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  6. ^ "Final tournament draw". UEFA.com.
  7. ^ "Finalists learn fate in Women's Under-19 draw". UEFA.com. 20 May 2015.
  8. ^ "Venue guide". UEFA.com.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "UEFA Technical Report – Results". UEFA.com.
  10. ^ "Statistics — Tournament phase — Player statistics — Goals". UEFA.com. Retrieved 27 July 2015.
  11. ^ "Official WU19 EURO squad of the tournament". UEFA. 29 July 2015.
  12. ^ "Golden Player – Stina Blackstenius". UEFA.com.
  13. ^ "Germany, Spain complete European foursome". FIFA.com. 21 July 2015.

External links[edit]