2016–17 ISU Speed Skating World Cup

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ISU Speed Skating World Cup
Dates 11 November 2016 – 11 March 2017

The 2016–17 ISU Speed Skating World Cup, officially the ISU World Cup Speed Skating 2016–2017, was a series of international speed skating competitions that ran the entire season. The season started on 11 November 2016 in Harbin, China, and ended with the final on 11 March 2017 in Stavanger, Norway.[1]

In total, six competition weekends were held at six different locations, 18 cups were contested (nine for men, and nine for women), and 88 races took place. Additionally, there were two Grand World Cups, one for men and one for women, in which all individual races, regardless of distance, counted.

The World Cup is organized by the International Skating Union (ISU).

Calendar[edit]

The detailed schedule for the season.[1]

WC # City Venue Date 500 m 1000 m 1500 m 3000 m 5000 m 10000 m Mass start Team pursuit Team sprint
1 Harbin Heilongjiang Indoor Rink 11–13 November 2m, 2w m, w m, w w m m, w m, w
2 Nagano M-Wave 18–20 November m, w m, w m, w w m m, w m, w m, w
3 Astana Alau Ice Palace 2–4 December 2m, 2w m, w m, w w m m, w m, w
4 Heerenveen Thialf 9–11 December m, w m, w m, w w m m, w m, w m, w
Heerenveen Thialf 6–8 January 2017 European Speed Skating Championships
5 Berlin Sportforum Hohenschönhausen 27–29 January 2m, 2w 2m, 2w m, w w m
Gangneung Gangneung Oval 9–12 February 2017 World Single Distance Speed Skating Championships
Calgary Olympic Oval 25–26 February 2017 World Sprint Speed Skating Championships
Hamar Vikingskipet 4–5 March 2017 World Allround Speed Skating Championships
6 TBD TBD 10–12 March 2m, 2w m, w m, w w m m, w m, w m, w
Total 10m, 10w 7m, 7w 6m, 6w 5w 5m, 1w 1m 5m, 5w 5m, 5w 3m, 3w
Note: the men's 5000 and 10000 metres were contested as one cup, and the women's 3000 and 5000 metres were contested as one cup, as indicated by the color coding.[1]

In addition, there were two combination cups, the allround combination and the sprint combination. For the allround combination, the distances were 1500 + 5000 metres for men, and 1500 + 3000 metres for women. For the sprint combination, the distances were 500 + 1000 metres, both for men and women. These cups were contested only in World Cup 5, in Berlin, Germany.

Entry rules[edit]

Qualification criteria[edit]

In order to qualify, skaters had to achieve the following results in ISU events, international competitions or national championships between 1 July 2015 and the entry deadline for the competition concerned.[1]

A in the Olympic Oval, Calgary, the Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City, or the Xinjiang Ice Sports Center, Ürümqi
B in other ice rinks
C or 6:35.00 on 5000 m
D or 6:40.00 on 5000 m
E or 4:15.00 on 3000 m
F or 4:20.00 on 3000 m

For the mass start and team pursuit events, skaters who had achieved any one of the above results were qualified. However, every ISU member nation was allowed to enter a maximum of one skater per gender who had not achieved any of these results, provided that they had achieved a 1500 m result of 1:57.50 (men) or 2:10.00 (women).[1]

Nation quotas[edit]

Every ISU member nation was allowed to enter at least one competitor for each distance, subject to the qualification criteria above. Additionally, countries placed among the top 40 in the final 2015–16 World Cup were allowed an additional entry per top 40 (though 5 riders in the top 40 were required to have the full quotum of 5). The maximum quota was 5 skaters. A member nation organizing a World Cup competition was granted the maximum quota in all events. Member nations not mentioned were allowed to enter a maximum of one skater for each distance.[1]


For the mass start event, a member nation was allowed to enter a maximum of two skaters, all subject to the qualifying criteria above. For the team pursuit and team sprint events, a member nation was allowed to enter one team only per category (men/women).[1]

The World Cup competitions 1–4 served as qualifying events for the 2017 European Championships and 2017 World Single Distance Championships. World Cup 5 served as a qualifying event for the 2017 World Allround Championships and 2017 World Sprint Championships. Results from World Cups 1–5 defined the seeding for the Single Distance Championships. World Cup 5 had extended entry quotas due to its status as qualifying event; each ISU member nation got one more quota place than its highest quota of either of the two distances in the competition, however, the maximum quota was still 5 places.[1]

Competition format[edit]

Seeding of skaters[edit]

If the number of entered skaters exceeded a certain limit, skaters competed in two separate divisions, A and B.[1] In the first competition, the composition of skaters in the respective division was determined by the ranking of the skaters in the respective distance category from the 2015–16 World Cup and the seeding submitted by the respective team leaders before the draw. For each country and distance category, the number of skaters in the ranking top of the previous year decided the number of places available in Division A, but the team leader's seeding decided which skater goes into which division.

In the following competitions, the current World Cup ranking was used, with special considerations to top-placed skaters in Division B of the previous competition. A skater was also under certain conditions allowed to apply for a wild card for Division A, but only the first time the skater participated in a distance category, and not in the first and last competitions of the season.[1] In the last competition for the season, there was no Division B.

Number of competitors in Division A
World Cup 1–5
number of entries
World Cup 6
Distance up to 20 21 to 24 25 to 28 29 or more
500 m
1000 m
1500 m
all all all 20 20
5000 m men
3000 m women
all 12 16 16 16
10000 m men
5000 m women
12 12 12 12
Mass start all all 16 20 20

Points system[edit]

Points tables[edit]

World Cup points for all competitions, except the last, were awarded in both divisions, using two sets of tables, A1/B1 and A2/B2. Tables A1 and B1 were used when the number of competitors in Division A exceeded 16, while tables A2 and B2 were used when that number was between 12 and 16. However, if table B1 was used for Division B in the first race in an event that is raced twice in the same competition, it was used also in the second race, regardless of the number of competitors in Division A.[1]

For the last competition, since there was no Division B, points were awarded using table A3.[1]

Mass start ranking[edit]

The mass start races were over 20 laps for men and 15 laps for women. There were three intermediate sprints, at 5, 10 and 15 laps for men, and at 4, 8 and 12 laps for women. Race points were awarded to the four first skaters at the intermediate sprints, and to the six first skaters at the final sprint.[1] The accumulated points a skater collected during a race decided the final ranking. For skaters who were tied in race points, including those who had failed to collect any, their finishing order broke the tie.

Points table for mass start
Rank Intermediate sprints Final sprint (finish)
1 5 31
2 3 15
3 2 10
4 1 5
5 3
6 1

Grand World Cup[edit]

In order to determine an overall World Cup winner, one for men and one for women, a special points system was used, awarding points for the top five skaters in each individual event.[1]

Points table for Grand World Cup
Rank World Cup 1–5 World Cup 6
1 10 15
2 8 12
3 7 10,5
4 6 9
5 5 7,5
Note: half points were awarded in distances that were skated twice in the same competition.

Prize money[edit]

Additionally, the Grand World Cup winner of each category (men/women) was awarded $20000.[1]

World records[edit]

World records going into the 2016–17 season.

Men[edit]

Distance Time Holder(s) Nat. Date Venue Reference
500 m 33.98 Pavel Kulizhnikov Russia 20 November 2015 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [2]
1000 m 1:06.42 Shani Davis United States 7 March 2009 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [3]
1500 m 1:41.04 Shani Davis United States 11 December 2009 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [4]
5000 m 6:03.32 Sven Kramer Netherlands 17 November 2007 Olympic Oval, Calgary [5]
10000 m 12:36.30 Ted-Jan Bloemen Canada 21 November 2015 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [6]
Team pursuit
(8 laps)
3:35.60 Koen Verweij
Jan Blokhuijsen
Sven Kramer
Netherlands 16 November 2013 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [7]

Women[edit]

Distance Time Holder(s) Nat. Date Venue Reference
500 m 36.36 Lee Sang-hwa South Korea 16 November 2013 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [8]
1000 m 1:12.18 Brittany Bowe United States 22 November 2015 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [9]
1500 m 1:50.85 Heather Richardson-Bergsma United States 21 November 2015 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [10]
3000 m 3:53.34 Cindy Klassen Canada 18 March 2006 Olympic Oval, Calgary [11]
5000 m 6:42.66 Martina Sáblíková Czech Republic 18 February 2011 Utah Olympic Oval, Salt Lake City [12]
Team pursuit
(6 laps)
2:55.79 Kristina Groves
Christine Nesbitt
Brittany Schussler
Canada 6 December 2009 Olympic Oval, Calgary [13]
  • New records :

Men's standings[edit]

Women's standings[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "International Skating Union – Communication No. 1958" (PDF). International Skating Union. 3 August 2015. Retrieved 14 October 2015.
  2. ^ "Evolution of the world record 500 meters Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2016.
  3. ^ "Evolution of the world record 1000 meters Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2015.
  4. ^ "Evolution of the world record 1500 meters Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2015.
  5. ^ "Evolution of the world record 5000 meters Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2015.
  6. ^ "Evolution of the world record 10,000 meters Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2016.
  7. ^ "Evolution of the world record Team pursuit Men". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  8. ^ "Evolution of the world record 500 meters Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  9. ^ "Evolution of the world record 1000 meters Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 28 November 2015.
  10. ^ "Evolution of the world record 1500 meters Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2016.
  11. ^ "Evolution of the world record 3000 meters Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2015.
  12. ^ "Evolution of the world record 5000 meters Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2015.
  13. ^ "Evolution of the world record Team pursuit Women". www.speedskatingstats.com. Retrieved 30 September 2015.

External links[edit]