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2016 24 Hours of Le Mans

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2016 24 Hours of Le Mans
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Index: Races | Winners
Porsche Team No. 2 Porsche 919 Hybrid, Winner of the 2016 24 Hours of Le Mans
SRT41 by OAK Racing No. 84 Morgan LMP2, First Garage 56 entry to Finish the 24 Hours of Le Mans
Circuit de la Sarthe track

The 84th 24 Hours of Le Mans (French: 84e 24 Heures du Mans) was an automobile endurance event held from 15 to 19 June 2016 at the Circuit de la Sarthe, Le Mans, France. It was the 84th running of the 24 Hour race organised by the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO) as well as the third and premier round of the 2016 FIA World Endurance Championship. A test day was held two weeks prior to the race on 5 June. The event was attended by 263,500 people.

Neel Jani of Porsche started from pole position for the second consecutive year, but heavy rainfall forced the organisers to start the race behind a safety car for the first time in history. Once the rain had stopped and the track sufficiently dried, the field was released from under safety car conditions. Toyota, Audi and Porsche traded off the race lead in the early hours until the No. 6 Toyota established a firm hold on first place, followed by the No. 5 Toyota and No. 2 Porsche. Issues for the No. 6 eventually allowed the No. 5 Toyota to take over the lead, maintaining a small gap from the Porsche. Kazuki Nakajima was driving the Toyota to the finish in the closing three minutes of the race when it suffered a mechanical issue and stopped on the circuit right after the finish line on his last lap. Jani overcame the one-minute gap with the ailing Toyota and passed it on the final lap, taking the race victory; It was Jani and co-driver Marc Lieb's first Le Mans win and Romain Dumas' second. The sister Toyota of Stéphane Sarrazin, Mike Conway and Kamui Kobayashi finished three laps behind in second, while the No. 8 Audi of Loïc Duval, Lucas di Grassi and Oliver Jarvis completed the race podium.

The Signatech Alpine-Nissan of Gustavo Menezes, Nicolas Lapierre and Stéphane Richelmi won the Le Mans Prototype 2 (LMP2) category after it led the final 196 laps of the race. Roman Rusinov, René Rast and Will Stevens of G-Drive Racing finished on the same lap as the Alpine, while the all-Russian SMP Racing BR01-Nissan of Vitaly Petrov, Kirill Ladygin and Viktor Shaytar was four laps behind in third. On the day of the fiftieth anniversary of their first overall 24 Hours of Le Mans victory, Ford won the Le Mans Grand Touring Endurance Professional (LMGTE) Pro class with the No. 68 American entry of Joey Hand, Sébastien Bourdais and Dirk Müller. Risi Competizione Ferrari were second with Giancarlo Fisichella, Toni Vilander and Matteo Malucelli, after they and the winning Ford had led all but 26 laps of the race. Ford USA's sister car of Ryan Briscoe, Scott Dixon and Richard Westbrook was third. Americans also led the Le Mans Grand Touring Endurance Amateur (LMGTE Am) category, with Scuderia Corsa's Townsend Bell, Jeff Segal and Bill Sweedler edging out the fellow Ferrari of AF Corse, driven by Emmanuel Collard, Rui Águas and François Perrodo. Khalid Al Qubaisi, Patrick Long and David Heinemeier Hansson were third in class for Abu Dhabi-Proton.

The result of the race meant Lieb, Jani and Dumas increased their Drivers' Championship advantage over the new second-placed Duval, di Grassi and Jarvis to 38 points while Kobayashi, Conway and Sarrazin's second-place finish allowed them to advance to third position. André Lotterer, Benoît Tréluyer and Marcel Fässler moved from eighth place to fourth and Alexandre Imperatori, Dominik Kraihamer and Mathéo Tuscher fell to fifth after not finishing the race. In the Manufacturers' Championship, Porsche extended their lead over Audi to 38 points while Toyota fell to third place with six races left in the season.

Background[edit]

The date for the 2016 Le Mans race was officially confirmed as part of the FIA World Endurance Championship's 2016 schedule at a FIA World Motor Sport Council meeting in Paris in December 2015. It was the third of nine scheduled endurance sports car rounds of the 2016 calendar and the 84th running of the event.[1] With the end of the race scheduled for 19 June, the event conflicted with the 2016 European Grand Prix.[2] Force India driver Nico Hülkenberg, who won the 2015 race with Porsche would be unable to return and defend his title, leading to accusations that Formula One Management had deliberately scheduled the race to conflict with Le Mans and prevent Formula One drivers from participating.[3]

Before the race Porsche drivers Marc Lieb, Neel Jani and Romain Dumas led the Drivers' Championship with 43 points, 18 ahead of nearest rivals Loïc Duval, Lucas di Grassi and Oliver Jarvis and a further three in front of Kamui Kobayashi, Mike Conway and Stéphane Sarrazin. Alexandre Imperatori, Dominik Kraihamer and Mathéo Tuscher were fourth on 15 points and their teammates Nick Heidfeld, Nico Prost and Nelson Piquet Jr. rounded out the top five with 12 points.[4] In the Manufacturers' Championship, Porsche lead with 55 points, 12 ahead of their nearest rivals Toyota in second position, and a further three in front of the third-placed manufacturer Audi.[4]

Circuit changes[edit]

Modifications were made to the circuit in the run-up to the race. A new entry run-off area was constructed at the Porsche Curves in response to a major accident sustained by Duval during practice for the 2014 24 Hours of Le Mans although the turn's alignment was not altered.[5] SAFER barriers were installed on the outside of the first entry section of the turn,[6] marking the technology's first appearance at a European motor racing venue.[7] Vincent Beaumesnil, the Automobile Club de l'Ouest's (ACO) sporting manager, revealed was easier to install a chicane, but following discussions with the national motor racing governing body of France, the Fédération Française du Sport Automobile, the circuit's layout was allowed to remain unchanged.[6]

Entries[edit]

The ACO initially planned to expand the race entry from 56 cars to 58 in 2015. But responding to an increase in the number of "high-quality entry requests" they allowed 60 entries for the 2016 race. The Selection Committee took steps to ensure the two additional required pits would be operational in time for the 2016 race.[8]

Automatic invitations[edit]

Teams that won their class in the previous running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans, or won championships in the European Le Mans Series or the Asian Le Mans Series earned automatic entry invitations. Some championship runners-up were also granted automatic invitations in certain series. Two participants in the WeatherTech SportsCar Championship are chosen by the series to be automatic entries by the ACO regardless of their performance. All FIA World Endurance Championship full-season entries automatically earned invitations. As invitations were granted to teams, they could change their cars from the previous year to the next but were not allowed to change their category. In the European and Asian Le Mans Series, the Le Mans Grand Touring Endurance (LMGTE) class invitations are allowed to choose between the Pro and Am categories. European Le Mans Series' Le Mans Prototype 3 (LMP3) champion is required to field an entry in Le Mans Prototype 2 (LMP2) while the Asian Le Mans Series LMP3 champion may choose between LMP2 or LMGTE Am. European Le Mans Series GTC class champions are limited to the LMGTE Am category.[9]

Among the fourteen automatic invitations granted, three teams chose not to accept: Team LNT and Marc VDS did not continue their European Le Mans Series efforts in 2016 while SMP Racing opted to concentrate on their LMP2 entries and forgo defense of their Le Mans victory in LMGTE Am.[9]

Reason invited LMP1 LMP2 LMGTE Am LMGTE Pro
1st in the 24 Hours of Le Mans Germany Porsche Team Hong Kong KCMG Russia SMP Racing United States Corvette Racing
1st in the European Le Mans Series (LMP2 and LMGTE) United Kingdom Greaves Motorsport Denmark Formula Racing
2nd in the European Le Mans Series (LMGTE) Belgium BMW Team Marc VDS
1st in the European Le Mans Series (LMP3 and GTC) United Kingdom Team LNT France TDS Racing
WeatherTech SportsCar Championship at-large entries United States Michael Shank Racing United States Scuderia Corsa
1st in the Asian Le Mans Series (LMP2 and GT) Switzerland Race Performance Singapore Clearwater Racing
1st in the Asian Le Mans Series (LMP3) China DC Racing

Entry list[edit]

In conjunction with the announcement of entries for the FIA World Endurance Championship and the European Le Mans Series, the ACO announced the full 60 car entry list and ten car reserve list in Paris on 5 February. In addition to the 32 guaranteed entries from the World Endurance Championship, 13 entries came from the European Le Mans Series, nine from the WeatherTech SportsCar Championship, four from the Asian Le Mans Series, while one-off entries competing only at Le Mans filled the rest of the field.[10]

Reserves[edit]

The ACE named ten reserves to replace any entries which were withdrawn prior to the official test session.[10] Greaves Motorsport, Riley Motorsports, and Proton Competition later withdrew their reserve entries. Algarve Pro Racing was promoted to the race entry when TDS Racing withdrew their LMGTE Am Aston Martin.[11] Six reserves remained before the race, with a second entry from Pegasus Racing and Team AAI, as well as lone entries from JMW Motorsport, Courage, OAK Racing, and DragonSpeed.[12]

Garage 56[edit]

The Garage 56 entry to display new technologies returned following an absence in 2015.[13] Frédéric Sausset, a quadruple amputee, participated in the race driving a modified Morgan LMP2 developed in conjunction with Onroak Automotive. The adapted automobile featured a throttle and braking system controlled by Sausset through his thighs while steering was achieved by attaching his right limb directly to the steering column. The car was also able to be driven in a normal fashion by his co-drivers.[14] SRT 41 initially planned to use a new Audi engine for the programme but later changed to the ubiquitous Nissan LMP2 engine. The team participated in the Silverstone European Le Mans Series race as a precursor to Le Mans, the first Garage 56 entry to compete prior to Le Mans.[15]

Debutants[edit]

Some drivers made their first appearance in the 2016 24 Hours of Le Mans. Four-time IndyCar Series champion Scott Dixon co-drove Ford Chip Ganassi Racing's No. 69 car, although he missed the first day of scrutineering because of a rain delay in the Firestone 600 at the Texas Motor Speedway.[16] It was announced in March that Olympic gold medallist and multiple cycling world champion Chris Hoy would share the No. 25 Algarve Pro Racing Ligier JS P2-Nissan with Andrea Pizzitola and Michael Munemann.[17] Hoy was the first Summer Olympic gold medallist to compete at Le Mans,[17] the ninth former Olympian to race there and the second Olympic champion to do so, after alpine skier Henri Oreiller.[18] British GT Championship race winner Oliver Bryant was paired with Johnny O'Connell and Mark Patterson in the No. 57 Team AAI Chevrolet Corvette C7.R.[19]

Testing and practice[edit]

A mandatory test session for all sixty entries was held on 5 June, split into two daytime sessions.[20] The morning session was led by Porsche, with Jani setting a lap time of three minutes and 22.334 seconds. The second Porsche of Mark Webber followed, ahead of the two Audis of Marcel Fässler and Duval and both Toyotas of Anthony Davidson and Kobayashi. Oreca vehicles led the LMP2 category with six cars at the top of the timing charts, with the Signatech Alpine of Nicolas Lapierre ahead of Eurasia Motorsport and Manor.[21] Porsche also led the LMGTE Pro category with a one-two, the No. 92 of Frédéric Makowiecki ahead of the No. 91 of Kévin Estre, followed by Oliver Gavin's No. 63 Chevrolet Corvette C7.R.[22] The No. 55 AF Corse Ferrari of Matt Griffin was the fastest in LMGTE Am on his final lap, ahead of the second Ferrari of Scuderia Corsa. The session was temporarily stopped halfway through when François Perrodo beached his car in the Porsche Curves gravel trap and required extraction.[21]

The No. 8 Audi R18 of Lucas di Grassi that set the fastest overall lap time in testing.

The second test session had Audi move to the top of the field when di Grassi set a three minute and 21.375 second lap time, followed by an improved time for the No. 1 Porsche of Webber. The No. 8 Audi required repairs for much of the session after issues arose with the car's suspension system. Tristan Gommendy improved the fastest lap in LMP2, moving Eurasia Motorsport ahead of the Signatech Alpine. The Michael Shank Ligier-Honda of Oswaldo Negri Jr. had a heavy accident in the session's final hour at the left-hand barriers entering the second Mulsanne Chicane, bringing a premature end to the test. Negri was unhurt. Antonio García moved the No. 63 Chevrolet Corvette ahead of the pair of Porsches of Nick Tandy and Makowiecki, while another Corvette in LMGTE Am, driven by reserve driver Nick Catsburg for Larbre Compétition, overtook the fastest time from the morning session.[23][24] Other incidents had the No. 99 Aston Martin of Liam Griffin trigger the activation of the slow zone system when it stopped at the first chicane,[23] and all cars slowed for Pu Jun Jin who went into the gravel trap at Mulsanne Corner. Yutaka Yamagishi impacted the tyre barrier at Tertere Rouge corner but was able to drive back to the pit lane. Tommy Milner spun his No. 64 Chevrolet Corvette at Dunlop Chicane. The safety car was deployed when Tracy Krohn beached his car in the Porsche curves entry gravel trap.[25]

A single four-hour free practice session was available to the teams before the three qualifying sessions.[20] Rain fell on parts of the circuit throughout the four hours. The No. 8 Audi led for much of the session until overtaken by the No. 2 Porsche Brendon Hartley until it too was pipped by Jani with a lap of three minutes and 22.011 seconds in the closing ten minutes.[26] The session was stopped briefly when Pierre Kaffer's ByKolles CLM-AER caught fire on the Mulsanne Straight after exiting the first chicane. Toyota ended the session with the No. 6 entry of Sarrazin heavily damaged at its front-end after hitting the barriers exiting the Indianapolis corner. Richard Bradley of KCMG led the LMP2 category ahead of the Signatech Alpine of Lapierre and Paul-Loup Chatin's Panis-Barthez Ligier-Nissan. Separate crashes by Bruno Senna of RGR Sport and Inès Taittinger of Pegasus Racing at the Porsche Curves and Indianapolis corner led to stoppages in the session.[26][27] Ford and Ferrari entrants led the LMGTE Pro field with three Ford cars leading the class until overtaken by the Risi Ferrari of Toni Vilander and later the No. 51 AF Corse car of Gianmaria Bruni. Townsend Bell of Scuderia Corsa led the LMGTE Am category for much of the session until Rob Bell gave Le Mans rookies Clearwater Racing the fastest lap of the class in the final fifteen minutes.[26][27]

Qualifying[edit]

Neel Jani took the second successive pole position for the No. 2 Porsche 919 Hybrid at Le Mans in the opening ten minutes of the first qualifying session as rain affected the next day's two qualifying sessions.

Six hours of qualifying sessions were available to all the entrants,[20] but pole position for the race was decided by Jani in the first ten minutes of the opening session. His three minute and 19.733 second lap time kept him at the top of the field as rain affected the two qualifying sessions the following day. The position was the second consecutive at Le Mans for both Jani and Porsche, while the sister car was nearly half a second behind in the second position. Sarrazin was a further half second behind for third, followed by the other Toyota of Davidson.[28] Audi struggled to get their cars on track at the start of the first session. Both R18s suffered mechanical ailments, eventually setting lap times three seconds slower than the pole position Porsche to hold onto fifth and sixth positions. Their best lap came from di Grassi.[29] Kraihamer was the fastest privateer in the No. 13 Rebellion. The ByKolles entry did not appear during the session while repairs were made following a fire in the practice session. René Rast of G-Drive Racing led the LMP2 category with a three minute and 36.605 second lap time set in the final fifteen minutes of the session, after the lead in the category had been swapped between the G-Drive entry and the two Alpines over the course of the two-hour session. Nelson Panciatici in DC Racing's Alpine held on for second in the class while Signatech's Lapierre was third. Jin had an accident near Tertre Rouge, heavily damaging his car, and ending Eurasia Motorsport's night.[29]

The LMGTE Pro category qualifying was swept by the new cars making their debuts at Le Mans. Ford's new GT in the hands of Dirk Müller set a lap time of three minutes and 51.185 seconds, three-tenths of a second ahead of its American sister car the No. 69 Ford of Ryan Briscoe. Ferrari's new 488 driven by Bruni was third in the class for AF Corse, a further tenth of a second behind the two Ford cars. The British pair of Fords driven by Olivier Pla and Harry Tincknell were in fourth and fifth places, followed by two further Ferraris, with Makowiecki's No. 92 Porsche almost four seconds off the class pole position time as the first vehicle with previous experience at Le Mans.[29][30] Risi Competizione's Ferrari brought out the only red flag of the session as Giancarlo Fisichella became stuck in the gravel trap at the Porsche Curves after a spin. In LMGTE Am Rob Bell's three minute and 56.827 second lap in the Clearwater Racing Ferrari beat out Pedro Lamy in the No. 98 Aston Martin; two AF Corse Ferrari cars driven by Matt Griffin and Emmanuel Collard followed in third and fourth positions.[29]

The following day the second qualifying session opened with a dry track but threatening skies. Several LMP2 and LMGTE teams were able to improve their qualifying times in the opening half an hour of the session before rainfall started. The biggest improvement in the beginning of the session was the Abu Dhabi-Proton Porsche in LMGTE Am, taking third place in the class, while the ByKolles CLM-AER of Kaffer went out in the wet to set first lap times of qualifying and take its place at the back of the LMP1 field.[31] Pegasus Racing led the few improved times in the LMP2 category to earn the fifteenth position. Porsche No. 1 was the fastest in the session, but its lap time was over three seconds off the provisional pole position. The second session ended without the track drying again and no times were improved in any category. All four Aston Martins chose not to set lap times in the session as they changed their engines.[31] The third qualifying session began an hour later under a light rain that changed to a deluge within ten minutes, prompting race officials to stop qualifying for nearly an hour as several cars aquaplaned. When the rain tapered off and qualifying resumed, many teams chose not to participate or set a large number of lap times as no improvements could be made to qualifying lap times.[31]

Following qualifying the ACO altered the balance of performance in the LMGTE Pro category, adding 10 kg (22 lb) of ballast and lowering turbocharger boost pressure in the Ford GT and adding 25 kg (55 lb) of ballast to the Ferrari 488s to lower their performance. Similarly, Aston Martin and Corvette received an increase in performance by allowing a larger air restrictor on the air intake of their engines. Porsche had no performance changes.[32]

Qualifying results[edit]

Provisional pole positions in each class are denoted in bold and indicated by double-dagger. The fastest time set by each entry is denoted with a gray background. Times for Qualifying 3 are not included as many teams did not set a lap time, and no team made an improvement on their time.

Pos. Class No. Team Qualifying 1[33] Qualifying 2[34] Gap Grid[35]
1 LMP1 2 Porsche Team 3:19.733 3:25.511 1double-dagger
2 LMP1 1 Porsche Team 3:20.203 3:23.307 +0.470 2
3 LMP1 6 Toyota Gazoo Racing 3:20.737 3:25.899 +1.004 3
4 LMP1 5 Toyota Gazoo Racing 3:21.903 3:24.399 +2.170 4
5 LMP1 7 Audi Sport Team Joest 3:22.780 3:45.468 +3.047 5
6 LMP1 8 Audi Sport Team Joest 3:22.823 3:26.680 +3.090 6
7 LMP1 13 Rebellion Racing 3:26.586 3:30.010 +6.853 7
8 LMP1 12 Rebellion Racing 3:27.348 3:27.573 +7.615 8
9 LMP1 4 ByKolles Racing Team No Time 3:34.168 +14.435 54[N 1]
10 LMP2 26 G-Drive Racing 3:36.605 4:04.887 +16.872 9double-dagger
11 LMP2 35 Baxi DC Racing Alpine 3:37.175 3:39.559 +17.442 10
12 LMP2 36 Signatech Alpine 3:37.225 3:40.895 +17.492 11
13 LMP2 44 Manor 3:38.037 No Time +18.304 12
14 LMP2 49 Michael Shank Racing 3:38.837 3:51.759 +19.104 13
15 LMP2 31 Extreme Speed Motorsports 3:39.366 3:40.436 +19.633 14
16 LMP2 46 Thiriet by TDS Racing 3:39.375 3:40.611 +19.642 15
17 LMP2 42 Strakka Racing 3:39.394 3:44.142 +19.661 16
18 LMP2 47 KCMG 3:39.436 3:39.562 +19.703 17
19 LMP2 23 Panis-Barthez Compétition 3:39.470 3:45.018 +19.737 18
20 LMP2 33 Eurasia Motorsport 3:40.631 4:14.491 +20.898 19
21 LMP2 38 G-Drive Racing 3:40.685 4:01.981 +20.952 20
22 LMP2 43 RGR Sport by Morand 3:40.899 3:44.198 +21.166 21
23 LMP2 27 SMP Racing 3:41.132 3:41.457 +21.399 55[N 2]
24 LMP2 28 Pegasus Racing 3:42.049 3:41.285 +21.552 56[N 1]
25 LMP2 30 Extreme Speed Motorsports 3:41.406 4:14.456 +21.673 57[N 1]
26 LMP2 37 SMP Racing 3:42.147 3:41.776 +22.043 22
27 LMP2 25 Algarve Pro Racing 3:44.185 3:42.088 +22.355 23
28 LMP2 41 Greaves Motorsport 3:43.915 3:42.570 +22.837 24
29 LMP2 48 Murphy Prototypes 3:43.508 3:45.067 +23.775 25
30 LMP2 34 Race Performance 3:43.590 3:45.711 +23.857 26
31 LMP2 22 SO24! by Lombard Racing 3:48.585 3:44.347 +24.614 58[N 1]
32 84 SRT41 by OAK Racing 3:45.178 4:01.607 +25.445 27
33 LMP2 40 Krohn Racing 3:45.213 3:45.978 +25.480 59[N 1]
34 LMGTE Pro 68 Ford Chip Ganassi Team USA 3:51.185 3:53.672 +31.452 28double-dagger
35 LMGTE Pro 69 Ford Chip Ganassi Team USA 3:51.497 3:53.603 +31.764 29
36 LMGTE Pro 51 AF Corse 3:51.568 3:53.218 +31.835 30
37 LMGTE Pro 67 Ford Chip Ganassi Team UK 3:51.590 3:55.750 +31.857 31
38 LMGTE Pro 66 Ford Chip Ganassi Team UK 3:52.038 3:58.358 +32.305 32
39 LMGTE Pro 71 AF Corse 3:52.508 3:55.066 +32.775 33
40 LMGTE Pro 82 Risi Competizione 3:53.176 3:55.032 +33.443 34
41 LMGTE Pro 92 Porsche Motorsport 3:54.918 3:57.128 +35.185 35
42 LMGTE Pro 95 Aston Martin Racing 3:55.261 No Time +35.528 36
43 LMGTE Pro 91 Porsche Motorsport 3:55.332 3:56.792 +35.599 37
44 LMGTE Pro 97 Aston Martin Racing 3:55.380 No Time +35.647 38
45 LMGTE Pro 77 Dempsey-Proton Racing 3:55.426 3:57.082 +35.693 39
46 LMGTE Pro 64 Corvette Racing - GM 3:55.848 3:58.493 +36.115 40
47 LMGTE Am 61 Clearwater Racing 3:56.827 4:06.801 +37.094 41double-dagger
48 LMGTE Am 98 Aston Martin Racing 3:57.198 No Time +37.465 42
49 LMGTE Am 88 Abu Dhabi-Proton Racing 3:59.861 3:57.513 +37.780 43
50 LMGTE Am 55 AF Corse 3:57.596 3:59.469 +37.863 44
51 LMGTE Am 83 AF Corse 3:57.742 4:03.676 +38.009 45
52 LMGTE Pro 63 Corvette Racing - GM 3:57.967 3:59.268 +38.234 60[N 2]
53 LMGTE Am 50 Larbre Compétition 3:58.018 4:27.530 +38.285 46
54 LMGTE Am 60 Formula Racing 3:58.760 4:03.851 +39.027 47
55 LMGTE Am 78 KCMG 3:59.245 3:59.034 +39.301 48
56 LMGTE Am 62 Scuderia Corsa 4:00.008 4:05.643 +40.275 49
57 LMGTE Am 89 Proton Competition 4:01.215 4:00.107 +40.374 50
58 LMGTE Am 86 Gulf Racing 4:01.046 4:09.283 +41.313 51
59 LMGTE Am 57 Team AAI 4:02.326 4:05.822 +42.593 52
60 LMGTE Am 99 Aston Martin Racing 4:03.148 No Time +43.415 53

Race[edit]

Warm-up[edit]

The cars took to the circuit on Saturday morning for a 45-minute warm-up session. The No. 7 Audi driven by André Lotterer set the fastest time with a lap of three minutes and 25.886 seconds. Kobayashi and Lieb were second and third for Toyota and Porsche. Duval was fourth-fastest and had the fastest lap until the session's quickest three drivers recorded their times. The fastest LMP2 lap was set by Rast with a time of three minutes and 40.724 seconds. Müller, driving the No. 68 Ford GT, was the quickest driver in the LMGTE Pro category, with the No. 88 Abu Dhabi-Proton Porsche of Patrick Long the fastest of all the LMGTE Am drivers.[37] Paul-Loup Chatin went off the track leaving the Porsche Curves and lightly damaged the right-hand side of his No. 23 Panis-Barthez car in a collision with the turn's barriers. This triggered the deployment of red flags to allow his vehicle to be removed to a safe area. David Cheng went through standing water turning right heading into Indianapolis corner and slid sideways. He attempted to regain control of his car but heavily damaged his vehicle's right-hand side. The session was ended prematurely because of the limited time available.[38]

Daytime[edit]

Weather conditions at the start of the race were wet. The air temperature throughout the race ranged from 12.2 to 20.4 °C (54.0 to 68.7 °F) and the track temperature between 13 and 32 °C (55 and 90 °F).[39] 263,500 people attended the event.[40] The French tricolour was waved at 15:00 Central European Summer Time (CEST) by actor Brad Pitt to start the race.[41] Heavy rain fell on the circuit in the hour before the event started, forcing the race organisers to start it behind the safety car for the first time in history.[42] During the reconnaissance lap, the Ford No. 66 GT was pushed into the garage after it lost gearbox pressure making it difficult to change gears.[43] The safety car remained on the track for 53 minutes after which the cars were allowed to overtake when the track begun to dry.[44] Jani maintained his pole position advantage heading into the first corner. Mike Conway's No. 6 Toyota tried unsuccessfully to pass Bernhard heading into Mulsanne corner, allowing Lotterer to attack him entering the Dunlop Bridge. The Audis passed the No. 5 Toyota of Sébastien Buemi for fourth and fifth. Conway overtook Bernhard on the way into the first Mulsanne Chicane for second and took the lead from Jani at the eighth lap's conclusion.[43]

Duval passed Bernhard for third place while Lotterer began a sequence of pit stops to change to dry compound tyres soon after. After the pit stops, Lotterer moved to the front of the race with Hartley in second and Duval third after both Toyotas had slow stops. Lotterer extended his advantage to seven seconds before entering the pit lane for an unscheduled stop. He was pushed into his garage for a change of turbocharger and repairs to his car's rear hydraulics system, promoting Hartley to the lead. Duval retook first by passing Hartley on the pit lane straight but lost the position to him at Mulsanne corner when a short rain shower fell.[45] The LMP2 lead was taken by Roberto Merhi's No. 44 Manor at the start of the hour after he switched to the intermediate tyres during the first lap of competitive racing. In LMGTE Pro, Makowiecki's No. 92 Porsche was 13.8 seconds ahead of Richard Westbrook's No. 69 Ford. Westbrook eroded Makowiecki's advantage by going two seconds per lap faster than him. He took the class lead on the approach to Mulsanne Corner before the second hour was over.[45][46] The battle for the outright lead continued to be a multi-car duel between representatives of the three manufacturers as they were separated by less than three seconds. This fluctuated due to the various levels of traffic.[47]

Webber's No. 1 Porsche and Kobayashi's No. 6 Toyota exchanged the lead through the following pit stop cycle and the next three hours as the Toyotas were on track longer. This meant they ran a lap more at full speed in their attempt at making one less stop later in the race.[48] The lead of LMGTE Pro was left to Vilander's Risi Ferrari after Briscoe relieved Westbrook in the No. 69 Ford. Vilander pulled away from Briscoe, whose performance faded in the early phase of his first stint, and he was caught by Joey Hand's sister No. 68 car which was on average 1.6 seconds faster than his. Hand moved out of Briscoe's slipstream and overtook him on the Mulsanne Straight for second in class. Hand later caught the category-leading vehicle of Vilander and the two battled for several minutes until Hand overhauled Vilander and Briscoe followed soon after.[49][50] In LMP2 Matthew Rao took over from Merhi in the class leading No. 44 Manor, but he was under pressure from Ryo Hirakawa's No. 46 TDS Racing car in second position and Will Stevens' third-placed No. 26 G-Drive entry with the trio close by one other. Four hours and fifty minutes into the race, Rao spun at the Dunlop Chicane. This promoted Hirakawa into the lead of LMP2 while Rao fell to fourth.[49]

Night[edit]

During the sixth hour of the race Kobayashi in the No. 6 Toyota was better able to mount a challenge to Webber and later Bernhard's No. 1 Porsche. Kobayashi lowered the No. 1 Porsche's advantage to 13.7 seconds after setting a new fastest lap of the race at three minutes and 21.445 seconds. He consistently set lap times in this range and strategically scythed his way through slower traffic. Matteo Malucelli returned the No. 82 Ferrari back to the front of LMGTE Pro after passing the two class leading Fords of Dixon and Stefan Mücke. Malucelli was later demoted from the top of LMGTE Pro to third when Sébastien Bourdais and later Dixon got ahead of him.[51][52] Kobayashi and later Sarrazin took the overall lead from Bernhard after a local slow zone procedure was activated for trackside officials to recover Taittinger's No. 28 Pegasus Morgan. He misjudged the braking point for the right-hand Mulsanne Corner and was beached in the gravel trap.[52] Bernhard lost forty seconds to Kobayashi because he lost sight on the approach to the slow zone due to the diminishing sunlight. He flat-spotted his tyres but stopped the No. 1 car from clouting the wall.[51][53] LMGTE Am had been led by Porsche from the start. The No. 88 Abu Dhabi-Proton car and the No. 78 KCMG entry exchanged the class lead until Lamy's No. 98 Aston Martin broke up the monopoly midway through the seventh hour when he overtook Christian Ried for second and began to draw closer to Long.[51][52]

As night fell on the circuit, the battle for the overall victory was left to both Toyotas and Porsches because Duval's No. 8 Audi dropped off the pace in fifth. Jani lapped more than a second faster than his teammate Bernhard and overtook him for second on the 120th lap.[54] This came as the Audis were instructed by race control to enter their garages for repairs to their number lighting systems.[55] Repairs to both Audis took less than six minutes each, and the team's drivers rejoined in the same positions they were in earlier.[54] Tsugio Matsuda's No. 47 KCMG car suffered an apparent power failure and pulled off to the side of the circuit on the straight linking the Mulsanne and Indianapolis turns. That allowed Roman Rusinov's No. 26 G-Drive Oreca back into third in LMP2 after the team recovered from a drive-through penalty and a subsequent puncture.[54][55] For 20 minutes the safety cars were dispatched to slow the race for a second time as two near simultaneous incidents involving GTE cars occurred. The first had Paul Dalla Lana's No. 98 Aston Martin hit the barrier beside the track on his way to the Porsche Curves. He spun across the track and beached the car facing oncoming traffic. Then Perrodo's No. 83 AF Corse Ferrari went straight into the gravel trap at Mulsanne Corner after he could not steer right.[54] In the meantime, Hartley's No. 1 Porsche was forced out of contention for the victory when it went to the garage for two and a half hours to rectify water pump and engine temperature problems, losing 39 laps and falling to 53rd.[56]

In LMP2 the safety cars had split the field, leaving Pierre Thiriet's No. 46 TDS Racing vehicle two minutes and 48 seconds ahead of Lapierre's second-place No. 36 Signatech Alpine car as it made a pit stop.[57] It did not, however, have much effect on the GTE classes as the gaps at the front of their respective fields was narrow.[54] When racing resumed Jani's No. 2 Porsche was able to attack Conway's No. 6 Toyota leaving Tertre Rouge turn and pass him for the lead into the first Mulsanne Chicane. Jani held the position until he made a pit stop and was relieved by Dumas.[57] Bradley ran wide into the entrance of the Porsche Curves due to a power steering failure that sent the No. 47 KCMG car deep into the gravel trap. The car was abandoned since it could not be restarted. Not long after Estre's No. 91 Porsche begun leaking oil on the run to the Porsche Curves as the car's engine failed. Pizzitola's No. 25 Algarve Pro entry was caught out by Estre's oil and slid sideways into the gravel. That caused the third deployment of the safety cars as marshals worked for 28 minutes to dry the spilled oil by scattering an oil-neutralising compound across the track. As the safety cars were recalled Dumas put pressure on Buemi's No. 5 Toyota and overtook him on the Mulsanne Straight for second. Soon after passing Kraihamer's No. 13 Rebellion for fifth Fässler's No. 7 Audi developed a hybrid system issue that forced its return to the pit lane.[58]

The LMGTE Am lead changed midway through the twelfth hour from Khalid Al-Qubaisi's No. 88 Abu Dhabi-Proton Porsche to Bell's No. 62 Scuderia Corsa Ferrari.[59] Not long after Stevens' No. 26 G-Drive Oreca served a one-minute stop-and-go penalty for speeding in a slow zone. He fell a further minute and a half behind Hirakawa's No. 46 TDS Racing car but stayed in third place in LMP2.[60] Several LMGTE cars took the opportunity to change brake discs at this point in the morning, including the LMGTE Pro leading Risi Ferrari of Fisichella. Halfway through the 13th hour, Kobayashi relinquished the No. 6 Toyota's hold on first to Lieb's No. 2 Porsche for five laps when he made an unscheduled pit stop to repair minor left-hand side bodywork damage.[59][61] Lieb could not establish a healthy advantage as a local slow zone procedure was needed for the No. 13 Rebellion of Tuscher who retired just before the entrance to the second Mulsanne Chicane with a fuel injector failure that shut down the R-One's engine.[59][61][62] Just after the slow zone was lifted, Lieb ran over some gravel that was strewn on the track and picked up a slow puncture. He was forced into the pit lane for a replacement wheel and fuel. Davidson's No. 5 Toyota inherited second. He started closing up to his teammate Kobayashi before Lieb retook the lead through the following pit stop cycle.[59][61]

Morning and early afternoon[edit]

A series of incidents in LMGTE Pro and LMP2 during the first hours of the morning prompted localised slow zone procedures and later the fourth deployment of the safety cars. Simon Dolan's No. 38 G-Drive car was hit by Dalla Lana's No. 98 Aston Martin that he lapped in the braking zone for the Ford Chicanes. Dolan was sent scuttling across the kerbing and heavily into the tyre barrier alongside the track. Later, Milner inflicted extensive damage to his No. 64 Corvette. He crashed into the end of the right-hand side tyre barrier at the entry to the Dunlop Chicane after losing control of its rear on the kerbs through driver error under braking. Soon after, Panciatici's fourth-placed No. 35 Baxi DC Alpine LMP2 ran straight across the gravel trap at the first Mulsanne Chicane and into the concrete wall. The final incident happened when Thiriet hit the inside barrier alongside the circuit and removed the front bodywork from the No. 46 TDS Racing entry. He then ran over several trackside bollards on his way to beaching in the gravel trap.[63][64][65] The safety car separated the LMP1 field as Conway's and Buemi's Toyotas made pit stops. After racing resumed they slipstreamed one another in slower traffic on the Mulsanne Straight and Buemi overtook Conway around the outside for second. Conway and Buemi retook first and second when Jani's No. 2 Porsche made a pit stop from the lead by the end of the 17th hour and emerged close behind the pair.[63]

The outright leaders settled down as the 18th hour approached. The two Toyotas opened up a healthy advantage over Jani's No. 2 Porsche. He could not match their pace after his race-long speed advantage had been nullified at that point. Müller's No. 68 Ford fell back from the battle for the lead of LMGTE Pro with the No. 82 Risi Ferrari of Malucelli on the 245th lap. Müller was penalised with a drive-through penalty for having the engine running during his refuelling pit stop. He responded by going a second per lap faster than Malucelli. It lowered his lead in LMGTE Pro to seven seconds going into the next pit stop phase.[66] Hand later relieved Müller in the No. 68 Ford and got the car back to the front of LMGTE Pro by overtaking Malucelli on the first part of the Mulsanne Straight. He began to pull clear with four and a half hours remaining. Lieb's No. 2 Porsche returned to the outright lead, but he ceded it to Davidson's faster No. 5 Toyota on the approach to Mulsanne corner. The sister No. 6 Toyota had an anxious moment when Kobayashi lost control of the car on the way into Karting corner and came to a rest in the gravel trap. He returned to third without needing external aid but lost 20 seconds to teammate Davidson. The pressure put on Ford by Ferrari in LMGTE Pro eased when Vilander pirouetted the rear of the No. 82 car leaving the Porsche Curves. He kept second in class despite getting temporarily beached in the gravel trap.[67][68]

Kobayashi bowed out of the battle for the outright victory when he went to his garage to fix the No. 6 Toyota's floor, which was damaged during the night when it hit a slower car and have a precautionary cooling system check done so it could get to the end of the race. Although repairs to the car lost it three laps to Davidson's sister No. 5 vehicle it retained its hold on third position as the No. 8 Audi was ten laps adrift in fourth.[69] Davidson and later Nakajima matched Jani's pace. He could not get a consistent rate of lap times or get closer to the front of the pack. This was after Porsche changed its strategy to match the one employed by Toyota throughout the event, which had the No. 2 car stay on track for fourteen lap stints.[70][71] Fuel mileage was also a concern for the LMGTE Pro leaders as Briscoe's No. 69 Ford stopped one lap later than all other cars in the class. That drew him closer to Vilander's No. 82 Risi Ferrari as Hand's sister No. 68 Ford was responding to his pace.[69][70] During the 22nd hour Mathias Lauda's No. 98 Aston Martin pulled off behind the left-hand concrete wall on the approach to the Porsche Curves with a terminal gearbox problem. Soon after that Tattinger's No. 28 Morgan Pegasus repeated its earlier excursion into the right-hand side gravel trap at Mulsanne Corner and retired a few minutes later with a right-rear tyre fire.[70]

Finish[edit]

The No. 5 Toyota TS050 Hybrid had a mechanical failure in the final six minutes that stopped the Japanese manufacturer from taking its first Le Mans victory.

With six minutes remaining Nakajima's No. 5 Toyota was ahead of Jani's No. 2 Porsche by seventy seconds and looked set to clinch the manufacturer's first overall Le Mans victory. But Nakajima slowed to less than 200 km/h (120 mph) on the Mulsanne Straight due to a failure of the connector line linking the turbocharger and the intercooler. That caused the car to suddenly lose control over the turbocharger and reduced horsepower. Nakajima slowed even more two minutes later, and stopped the No. 5 Toyota after the start/finish line as the car's power gave out entirely.[72][73] Jani overcame the gap and overtook Nakajima seconds later to take the chequered flag for the No. 2 Porsche and the marque's eighteenth overall victory at Le Mans. It was Jani and Lieb's first Le Mans victory and Dumas' second after triumphing in 2010. The sister No. 6 Toyota of Sarrazin, Conway and Kobayashi finished three laps behind in second, while the No. 8 Audi of Duval, di Grassi and Jarvis took third to maintain Audi's record of getting one car on the podium since debuting in 1999.[74] The No. 36 Signatech Alpine of Lapierre, Gustavo Menezes and Stéphane Richelmi led the final 196 laps to take the victory in LMP2.[75] The second-placed No. 26 G-Drive Oreca of Rusinov, Rast and Stevens finished on the same lap as the Alpine. It gave Lapierre his second successive category win and Menezes and Richelmi's first. The all-Russian SMP Racing BR01 of Vitaly Petrov, Kirill Ladygin and Viktor Shaytar, which came four laps behind in third, completed the class podium.[76]

On the day of the fiftieth anniversary of their first overall 24 Hours of Le Mans victory in 1966, Ford won the LMGTE Pro class with the No. 68 American entry of Hand, Bourdais and Müller. Risi Competizione's No. 82 Ferrari were provisionally one minute adrift in second position with Fisichella, Vilander and Malucelli after they and the category winning Ford had led all but 26 laps of the race. Ford Chip Ganassi Racing USA's sister No. 69 car of Briscoe, Dixon and Westbrook was third.[75][77] After the race the No. 68 Ford was penalised a total of 70 seconds towards its total race time for being deemed to have sped in a slow zone and for having faulty wheel speed sensors. Risi's No. 82 Ferrari had twenty seconds added to its total time and fined €5,000 for ignoring multiple black flags with an orange disc that were deployed to instruct the team to rectify a faulty leader light board after Ford Chip Ganassi Racing filed a protest over the technical problem in the final hour of the event. The result of the penalties reduced the No. 68 Ford's margin of victory over the No. 82 Risi Ferrari to 10.2 seconds.[78] American also led LMGTE Am with the Scuderia Corsa's No. 62 Ferrari of Bell, Jeff Segal, and Bill Sweedler edging out the fellow No. 83 Ferrari of AF Corse, driven by Emmanuel Collard, Rui Águas. Perrodo. Al Qubaisi, Long, and David Heinemeier Hansson were third in class for Abu Dhabi-Proton.[77] There were 28 outright lead changes during the race; four cars reached the front of the field. The No. 6 Toyota led thirteen times for 173 laps, more than any other car. The No. 2 Porsche led twelve times for a total of 51 laps.[75]

Post-race[edit]

The top three finishers in all four categories appeared on the podium to collect their trophies and at their own separate press conferences. Lieb said of the No. 2 Porsche's outright victory, "The last quadruple stint I did was really on the edge. Even the first three stints were quite difficult with overtaking in the traffic and taking risks. In the last one I then also had to save fuel, and especially the front tyres that began to lose performance. I gave everything I had—and now I think I have to digest what all has happened today."[79] Kobayashi said the performance of the No. 6 Toyota demonstrated its strong pace, but that the team was not happy with second place, "Unfortunately our second position was not what we wanted. We are here to win so I am not really happy."[79] His co-driver Conway spoke of his mixed feelings over the result, "I have mixed feelings. Second is okay but we are all gutted for car #5. They drove a great race ... It’s okay to get one car on the podium but we wanted more." [79] Third-placed di Grassi described Audi's race as "horrible" and said the improved competition from Porsche and Toyota would require his team to improve for the rest of the season. "To finish on the podium is a nice reward, but this race [performance] is not Audi, with how many times we went into the garage, how many repairs we had to do, and how much time we spent stopped. We have to improve a lot. We have to beat the others on the track."[80]

The mechanical failure of the No. 5 Toyota in the closing minutes overshadowed the event.[81] Toyota team principal Hughes de Chaunac was visibly distraught and tearful over the manufacturer being denied a maiden victory at Le Mans.[82] He said, "You cannot accept that three minutes before the flag and just in front of you. You cannot believe it, we are just dreaming, it is so hard to accept it."[83] Other motorsport people including Jarvis, Jani, Webber, and the head of Audi Motorsport Wolfgang Ullrich, expressed their sympathy to Toyota.[79][83] Following the completion of an initial investigation into the failure five days later, Toyota denied any connection to similar engine problems the cars had at the preceding 6 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps held the month before.[72] The No. 5 car was not classified in the final result because it completed the last lap in 11 minutes and 53.815 seconds and it scored no championship points.[84] After discussion over the final lap, the ACO announced a new series of rule changes in December 2016 to deal with cars in the final minutes. The standards by which a car is classified have been changed. Instead of the mandatory six minutes for the final lap of the race, penalties will be awarded for any lap over six minutes on a gradual scale. Failure to complete the last lap of the race in under fifteen minutes will now lead to a car no longer being classified. Under the 2017 rules, there would have been a ten-lap penalty for the No. 5 car.[85]

The result of the race meant Lieb, Jani and Dumas increased their advantage over the new second-placed trio of Duval, di Grassi and Jarvis in the Drivers' Championship to 39 points. Kobayashi, Conway and Sarrazin's second place finish allowed the trio to advance to third position in the standings. Lotterer, Fassler and Treulyer moved into fourth place and Kraihamer, Imperatori and Tuscher's non-finish dropped them to fifth.[4] In the Manufacturers' Championship, Porsche extended their lead over Audi to 38 points and Toyota fell to third position with six races left in the season.[4]

Race results[edit]

The minimum number of laps for classification (70% of the overall winning car's race distance) was 268 laps. Class winners are denoted with bold and double-dagger.[86]

Pos Class No Team Drivers Chassis Tyre Laps Time/Retired
Engine
1 LMP1 2 Germany Porsche Team Germany Marc Lieb
France Romain Dumas
Switzerland Neel Jani
Porsche 919 Hybrid M 384 24:00:38.449double-dagger
Porsche 2.0 L Turbo V4
2 LMP1 6 Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing France Stéphane Sarrazin
United Kingdom Mike Conway
Japan Kamui Kobayashi
Toyota TS050 Hybrid M 381 +3 Laps
Toyota 2.4 L Turbo V6
3 LMP1 8 Germany Audi Sport Team Joest France Loïc Duval
Brazil Lucas di Grassi
United Kingdom Oliver Jarvis
Audi R18 M 372 +12 Laps
Audi TDI 4.0 L Turbo Diesel V6
4 LMP1 7 Germany Audi Sport Team Joest Germany André Lotterer
Switzerland Marcel Fässler
France Benoît Tréluyer
Audi R18 M 367 +17 Laps
Audi TDI 4.0 L Turbo Diesel V6
5 LMP2 36 France Signatech Alpine France Nicolas Lapierre
United States Gustavo Menezes
Monaco Stéphane Richelmi
Alpine A460 D 357 +27 Lapsdouble-dagger
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
6 LMP2 26 Russia G-Drive Racing Russia Roman Rusinov
United Kingdom Will Stevens
Germany René Rast
Oreca 05 D 357 +27 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
7 LMP2 37 Russia SMP Racing Russia Vitaly Petrov
Russia Viktor Shaytar
Russia Kirill Ladygin
BR Engineering BR01 D 353 +31 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
8 LMP2 42 United Kingdom Strakka Racing United Kingdom Nick Leventis
United Kingdom Jonny Kane
United Kingdom Danny Watts
Gibson 015S D 351 +33 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
9 LMP2 33 Philippines Eurasia Motorsport China Pu Jun Jin
France Tristan Gommendy
Netherlands Nick de Bruijn
Oreca 05 D 348 +37 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
10 LMP2 41 United Kingdom Greaves Motorsport Mexico Memo Rojas
France Julien Canal
France Nathanaël Berthon
Ligier JS P2 D 348 +37 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
11 LMP2 27 Russia SMP Racing France Nicolas Minassian
Italy Maurizio Mediani
Russia Mikhail Aleshin
BR Engineering BR01 D 347 +37 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
12 LMP2 23 France Panis-Barthez Compétition France Fabien Barthez
France Timothé Buret
France Paul-Loup Chatin
Ligier JS P2 M 347 +37 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
13 LMP1 1 Germany Porsche Team Germany Timo Bernhard
New Zealand Brendon Hartley
Australia Mark Webber
Porsche 919 Hybrid M 346 +38 Laps
Porsche 2.0 L Turbo V4
14 LMP2 49 United States Michael Shank Racing United States John Pew
Brazil Oswaldo Negri Jr.
Belgium Laurens Vanthoor
Ligier JS P2 D 345 +39 Laps
Honda HR28TT 2.8 L Turbo V6
15 LMP2 43 Mexico RGR Sport by Morand Mexico Ricardo González
Portugal Filipe Albuquerque
Brazil Bruno Senna
Ligier JS P2 D 344 +40 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
16 LMP2 30 United States Extreme Speed Motorsports United States Scott Sharp
United States Ed Brown
United States Johannes van Overbeek
Ligier JS P2 D 341 +43 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
17 LMP2 25 Portugal Algarve Pro Racing United Kingdom Michael Munemann
United Kingdom Chris Hoy
France Andrea Pizzitola
Ligier JS P2 D 341 +43 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
18 LMGTE
Pro
68 United States Ford Chip Ganassi Team USA United States Joey Hand
Germany Dirk Müller
France Sébastien Bourdais
Ford GT M 340 +44 Lapsdouble-dagger
Ford EcoBoost 3.5 L Turbo V6
19 LMGTE
Pro
82 United States Risi Competizione Italy Giancarlo Fisichella
Italy Matteo Malucelli
Finland Toni Vilander
Ferrari 488 GTE M 340 +44 Laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
20 LMGTE
Pro
69 United States Ford Chip Ganassi Team USA Australia Ryan Briscoe
United Kingdom Richard Westbrook
New Zealand Scott Dixon
Ford GT M 340 +44 Laps
Ford EcoBoost 3.5 L Turbo V6
21 LMGTE
Pro
66 United States Ford Chip Ganassi Team UK France Olivier Pla
Germany Stefan Mücke
United States Billy Johnson
Ford GT M 339 +45 Laps
Ford EcoBoost 3.5 L Turbo V6
22 LMP2 40 United States Krohn Racing United States Tracy Krohn
Sweden Niclas Jönsson
Portugal João Barbosa
Ligier JS P2 M 338 +47 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
23 LMGTE
Pro
95 United Kingdom Aston Martin Racing Denmark Nicki Thiim
Denmark Marco Sørensen
United Kingdom Darren Turner
Aston Martin V8 Vantage GTE D 338 +47 Laps
Aston Martin 4.5 L V8
24 LMGTE
Pro
97 United Kingdom Aston Martin Racing Brazil Fernando Rees
United Kingdom Jonathan Adam
New Zealand Richie Stanaway
Aston Martin V8 Vantage GTE D 337 +47 Laps
Aston Martin 4.5 L V8
25 LMGTE
Pro
63 United States Corvette Racing - GM Denmark Jan Magnussen
Spain Antonio García
United States Ricky Taylor
Chevrolet Corvette C7.R M 336 +48 Laps
Chevrolet LT5.5 5.5 L V8
26 LMGTE
Am
62 United States Scuderia Corsa United States Bill Sweedler
United States Townsend Bell
United States Jeff Segal
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 331 +53 Lapsdouble-dagger
Ferrari F136GT 4.5 L V8
27 LMGTE
Am
83 Italy AF Corse France François Perrodo
France Emmanuel Collard
Portugal Rui Águas
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 331 +53 Laps
Ferrari F136GT 4.5 L V8
28 LMGTE
Am
88 United Arab Emirates Abu Dhabi-Proton Racing United Arab Emirates Khalid Al Qubaisi
United States Patrick Long
Denmark David Heinemeier Hansson
Porsche 911 RSR M 330 +54 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
29 LMP1 12 Switzerland Rebellion Racing France Nicolas Prost
Germany Nick Heidfeld
Brazil Nelson Piquet Jr.
Rebellion R-One D 330 +54 Laps
AER P60 2.4 L Turbo V6
30 LMGTE
Am
61 Singapore Clearwater Racing Malaysia Weng Sun Mok
United Kingdom Rob Bell
Japan Keita Sawa
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 329 +55 Laps
Ferrari F136GT 4.5 L V8
31 LMGTE
Pro
77 Germany Dempsey-Proton Racing Austria Richard Lietz
Austria Philipp Eng
Denmark Michael Christensen
Porsche 911 RSR M 329 +55 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
32 LMP2 22 France SO24! by Lombard Racing France Vincent Capillaire
France Erik Maris
United Kingdom Jonathan Coleman
Ligier JS P2 D 328 +56 Laps
Judd HK 3.6 L V8
33 LMGTE
Am
86 United Kingdom Gulf Racing United Kingdom Mike Wainwright
United Kingdom Adam Carroll
United Kingdom Ben Barker
Porsche 911 RSR M 328 +56 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
34 LMP2 48 Republic of Ireland Murphy Prototypes United States Ben Keating
Belgium Marc Goossens
Netherlands Jeroen Bleekemolen
Oreca 03R D 323 +61 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
35 LMGTE
Am
60 Denmark Formula Racing Denmark Johnny Laursen
Denmark Christina Nielsen
Denmark Mikkel Mac
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 319 +65 Laps
Ferrari F136GT 4.5 L V8
36 LMGTE
Am
99 United Kingdom Aston Martin Racing United Kingdom Andrew Howard
United Kingdom Liam Griffin
Switzerland Gary Hirsch
Aston Martin V8 Vantage GTE D 318 +66 Laps
Aston Martin 4.5 L V8
37 LMGTE
Am
50 France Larbre Compétition Japan Yutaka Yamagishi
France Pierre Ragues
France Jean-Philippe Belloc
Chevrolet Corvette C7.R M 316 +68 Laps
Chevrolet LT5.5 5.5 L V8
38 84 France SRT41 by OAK Racing France Fréderic Sausset
France Christophe Tinseau
France Jean-Bernard Bouvet
Morgan LMP2 M 315 +69 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
39 LMGTE
Am
57 Taiwan Team AAI United States Johnny O'Connell
United States Mark Patterson
United Kingdom Oliver Bryant
Chevrolet Corvette C7.R M 306 +78 Laps
Chevrolet LT5.5 5.5 L V8
40 LMGTE
Pro
67 United States Ford Chip Ganassi Team UK United Kingdom Andy Priaulx
United Kingdom Marino Franchitti
United Kingdom Harry Tincknell
Ford GT M 306 +78 Laps
Ford EcoBoost 3.5 L Turbo V6
41 LMGTE
Am
78 Hong Kong KCMG Germany Christian Ried
Germany Wolf Henzler
Switzerland Joël Camathias
Porsche 911 RSR M 300 +84 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
42 LMP2 31 United States Extreme Speed Motorsports United Kingdom Ryan Dalziel
Canada Chris Cumming
Brazil Pipo Derani
Ligier JS P2 D 297 +87 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
43 LMGTE
Am
55 Italy AF Corse United Kingdom Duncan Cameron
United Kingdom Aaron Scott
Republic of Ireland Matt Griffin
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 289 +94 Laps
Ferrari F136GT 4.5 L V8
44 LMP2 34 Switzerland Race Performance Switzerland Nicolas Leutwiler
United Kingdom James Winslow
Japan Shinji Nakano
Oreca 03R D 289[N 3] +94 Laps
Judd HK 3.6 L V8
NC[N 4] LMP1 5 Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing United Kingdom Anthony Davidson
Switzerland Sébastien Buemi
Japan Kazuki Nakajima
Toyota TS050 Hybrid M 384 Not classified
Toyota 2.4 L Turbo V6
DNF LMP2 28 Germany Pegasus Racing France Inès Taittinger
France Léo Roussel
France Rémy Striebig
Morgan LMP2 M 292 Fire
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 44 United Kingdom Manor Thailand Tor Graves
United Kingdom Matthew Rao
Spain Roberto Merhi
Oreca 05 D 283 Accident
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
98 United Kingdom Aston Martin Racing Canada Paul Dalla Lana
Portugal Pedro Lamy
Austria Mathias Lauda
Aston Martin V8 Vantage GTE D 281 Gearbox
Aston Martin 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 46 France Thiriet by TDS Racing France Pierre Thiriet
Switzerland Mathias Beche
Japan Ryō Hirakawa
Oreca 05 D 241 Crash
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 35 China Baxi DC Racing Alpine China David Cheng
China Ho-Pin Tung
France Nelson Panciatici
Alpine A460 D 234 Crash
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 38 Russia G-Drive Racing United Kingdom Simon Dolan
United Kingdom Jake Dennis
Netherlands Giedo van der Garde
Gibson 015S D 222 Crash
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
64 United States Corvette Racing - GM United Kingdom Oliver Gavin
United States Tommy Milner
United States Jordan Taylor
Chevrolet Corvette C7.R M 219 Accident
Chevrolet LT5.5 5.5 L V8
DNF LMP1 4 Austria ByKolles Racing Team Switzerland Simon Trummer
Germany Pierre Kaffer
United Kingdom Oliver Webb
CLM P1/01 D 206 Engine
AER P60 2.4 L Turbo V6
DNF LMP1 13 Switzerland Rebellion Racing Austria Dominik Kraihamer
Switzerland Alexandre Imperatori
Switzerland Mathéo Tuscher
Rebellion R-One D 200 Fuel injector
AER P60 2.4 L Turbo V6
DNF LMGTE
Pro
51 Italy AF Corse Italy Gianmaria Bruni
Italy Alessandro Pier Guidi
United Kingdom James Calado
Ferrari 488 GTE M 179 Engine
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
71 Italy AF Corse Italy Davide Rigon
Italy Andrea Bertolini
United Kingdom Sam Bird
Ferrari 488 GTE M 143 Wheel
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
92 Germany Porsche Motorsport France Frédéric Makowiecki
Germany Jörg Bergmeister
New Zealand Earl Bamber
Porsche 911 RSR M 140 Suspension
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
DNF LMGTE
Pro
91 Germany Porsche Motorsport France Patrick Pilet
France Kévin Estre
United Kingdom Nick Tandy
Porsche 911 RSR M 135 Engine
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
DNF LMP2 47 Hong Kong KCMG Japan Tsugio Matsuda
United Kingdom Richard Bradley
United Kingdom Matthew Howson
Oreca 05 D 116 Electrical
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
89 Germany Proton Competition[N 5] United States Leh Keen
United States Marc Miller
Porsche 911 RSR M 50 Crash
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6

Standings after the race[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e The No. 4 ByKolles CLM-AER, No. 28 Pegasus Morgan-Nissan, No. 30 Extreme Speed Ligier-Nissan, No. 22 SO24! Ligier-Judd, and No. 40 Krohn Ligier-Nissan were all demoted to the back of the starting grid for having a driver fail to set a lap time within 110% of their respective class pole position time.[36]
  2. ^ a b The No. 27 SMP BR01-Nissan and No. 63 Corvette were demoted to the back of the grid for having a driver fail to complete a minimum of five laps at night during qualifying.[36]
  3. ^ The No. 34 Race Performance Oreca-Judd was penalized for failing to meet the minimum drive time for the team's silver-rated driver. Eight laps plus two minutes were added to the team's total to account for the lost time.[87]
  4. ^ The No. 5 Toyota was not classified in the race result for failing to complete the final lap of the race in under six minutes.[84]
  5. ^ Cooper MacNeil was not allowed to drive the No. 89 Proton Porsche after becoming ill before the race. A last minute switch to reserve driver Gunnar Jeannette was denied by the ACO. The entry was allowed by the ACO to compete with only two drivers.[88]

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External links[edit]


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