2016 California Proposition 61

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Proposition 61
State Prescription Drug Purchase Standards
Results
Votes %
Yes 6,254,342 46.80%
No 7,109,642 53.20%
Valid votes 13,363,984 91.47%
Invalid or blank votes 1,246,525 8.53%
Total votes 14,610,509 100.00%
Registered voters/turnout 19,411,771 75.27%
Results by county
2016CaliforniaProposition61.svg
  Yes     No
Source: California Secretary of State[1]

Proposition 61 was a California ballot proposition that appeared on the November 8, 2016 ballot. It would have prohibited the state of California from buying any prescription drug from a drug manufacturer at price over the lowest price paid for the drug by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. It would have exempted managed care programs funded through Medi-Cal.[2] According to the fiscal impact statement issued by California Legislative Analyst's Office, "potential for state savings of an unknown amount depending on (1) how the measure’s implementation challenges are addressed and (2) the responses of drug manufacturers regarding the provision and pricing of their drugs." [3]

Proposition 61 was rejected by a vote of 47 to 53 percent.[4]

Reactions & Analysis[edit]

Supporters[edit]

Individuals[edit]

Organizations[edit]

Parties[edit]

Opponents[edit]

Organizations[edit]

Parties[edit]

Public Opinion[edit]

Public opinion on Proposition 61
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
% support % opposition % Undecided/Don't Know
Field/YouGov October 25–31, 2016 998 LV N/A 47% 47% 6%
Hoover Institution/YouGov October 4–14, 2016 1248 LV ± 3.28% 51% 24% 25%
Field/YouGov[permanent dead link] September 7–13, 2016 943 LV N/A 50% 16% 34%
USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times[note 1] September 1–8, 2016 1912 RV ± 3% 66% 23% 12%

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Totals do not sum to 100% due to rounding

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Statement of Vote - November 8, 2016, General Election". December 16, 2016. Retrieved January 7, 2017.
  2. ^ "Proposition 61. California General Election November 8, 2016. Official Voter Information Guide". California Secretary of State. Retrieved 10 October 2016.[permanent dead link]
  3. ^ Taylor, Mac; Cohen, Michael. "Fiscal Impact Statement" (PDF). State of California Department of Justice Office of the Attorney General. Retrieved 11 October 2016.
  4. ^ Sernoffsky, Evan (November 9, 2016). "California voters reject drug-price measure Prop 61". SFGate. Retrieved December 7, 2016.
  5. ^ Mai-Duc, Christine; Bollag, Sophia (2016-11-07). "Bernie Sanders campaigns for Prop. 61 in California". Los Angeles Times. tronc, Inc. Archived from the original on November 8, 2016.
  6. ^ a b c d e Mai-Duc, Christine (2016-11-04). "What you need to know about Prop. 61, the spendy prescription drug measure on November's ballot". Los Angeles Times. tronc, Inc. Archived from the original on November 8, 2016.
  7. ^ Karlin-Smith, Sarah; Norman, Brett (2016-08-22). "Part D pricing trends". Politico.com. Politico. Archived from the original on August 22, 2016.
  8. ^ The Communications Committee (2016-09-01). "The Statewide Ballot Measures". Peace and Freedom Party. Archived from the original on November 9, 2016.
  9. ^ "Progressive Democrats of America". Progressive Democrats of America Facebook page. 2016-10-29. Archived from the original on November 10, 2016.
  10. ^ Mai-Duc, Christine (2016-10-31). "The Rev. Al Sharpton and civil rights leaders hold rally in support of Proposition 61". The Los Angeles Times. tronc, Inc. Archived from the original on November 1, 2016.
  11. ^ "We Oppose Proposition 61" (PDF). Veterans of Foreign Wars - Department of California. 2016-07-29. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-11-11.
  12. ^ "Proposition 61: Mandated Cap on Drug Prices" (PDF). California Taxpayers Association. 2016. Archived (PDF) from the original on November 9, 2016.
  13. ^ "Vote No: Proposition 61". The Republican Party of California. 2016. Archived from the original on November 9, 2016.
  14. ^ "Measures". Libertarian Party of California. 2016-08-21. Archived from the original on October 21, 2016. Retrieved November 9, 2016.
  15. ^ "November 8, 2016 Endorsements". Alice B. Toklas LGBT Democratic Club. 2016-08-17. Archived from the original on November 9, 2016.

External links[edit]