2016 Masters Tournament

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2016 Masters Tournament
Tournament information
Dates April 7–10, 2016
Location Augusta, Georgia, U.S.
Course(s) Augusta National Golf Club
Tour(s)
Statistics
Par 72
Length 7,435 yards (6,799 m)
Field 89 players, 57 after cut
Cut 150 (+6)
Prize fund $10,000,000
8,743,550
Winner's share $1,800,000
€1,573,839
Champion
England Danny Willett
283 (−5)
← 2015
2017 →
Augusta  is located in the US
Augusta 
Augusta 
Location in the United States

The 2016 Masters Tournament was the 80th edition of the Masters Tournament, held April 7–10 at Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia. Danny Willett won his first major championship, three strokes ahead of runners-up Lee Westwood and defending champion Jordan Spieth.[1] Spieth suffered one of the biggest collapses in Masters history.[2] Spieth led the tournament from the first round and built a five-shot lead going to the back nine on Sunday, but lost six shots to par over the next three holes culminating in a quadruple-bogey on the 12th hole where he hit two balls into Rae's Creek.[3] Willett shot a bogey-free 67 to overtake Spieth when the leader faltered on the back nine. Willett became the first European to win the Masters since 1999, and the first Englishman to do so since Nick Faldo in 1996.[4]

This was the final Masters appearance for former champion Tom Watson.

Course[edit]

The course was formerly a plant nursery and each hole on the course is named after the tree or shrub with which it has become associated.[5]

Hole Name Yards Par Hole Name Yards Par
1 Tea Olive 445 4 10 Camellia 495 4
2 Pink Dogwood 575 5 11 White Dogwood 505 4
3 Flowering Peach 350 4 12 Golden Bell 155 3
4 Flowering Crab Apple 240 3 13 Azalea 510 5
5 Magnolia 455 4 14 Chinese Fir 440 4
6 Juniper 180 3 15 Firethorn 530 5
7 Pampas 450 4 16 Redbud 170 3
8 Yellow Jasmine 570 5 17 Nandina 440 4
9 Carolina Cherry 460 4 18 Holly 465 4
Out 3,725 36 In 3,710 36
Source: Total 7,435 72

Field[edit]

The Masters has the smallest field of the four major championships. Officially, the Masters remains an invitation event, but there is a set of qualifying criteria that determines who is included in the field. Each player is classified according to the first category by which he qualified, with other categories in which he qualified shown in parentheses.

Golfers who qualify based solely on their performance in amateur tournaments (categories 6–10) must remain amateurs on the starting day of the tournament to be eligible to play.

1. Past Masters Champions

Ángel Cabrera, Trevor Immelman, Zach Johnson (3,11,13,16,17,18), Bernhard Langer, Sandy Lyle, Phil Mickelson (3,11,17,18), Larry Mize, Mark O'Meara, Charl Schwartzel (15,17,18), Adam Scott (12,15,17,18), Vijay Singh, Jordan Spieth (2,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18), Bubba Watson (15,16,17,18), Tom Watson, Mike Weir, Ian Woosnam

2. Last five U.S. Open Champions

Martin Kaymer (5,17,18), Rory McIlroy (3,4,11,15,16,17,18), Justin Rose (11,14,15,16,17,18), Webb Simpson

3. Last five British Open Champions

Darren Clarke, Ernie Els

4. Last five PGA Champions

Keegan Bradley, Jason Day (13,14,15,16,17,18), Jason Dufner (15)

5. Last three winners of The Players Championship

Rickie Fowler (11,15,16,17,18)

6. Top two finishers in the 2015 U.S. Amateur

Derek Bard (a), Bryson DeChambeau (a)

7. Winner of the 2015 Amateur Championship

Romain Langasque (a)

8. Winner of the 2015 Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship

Jin Cheng (a)

9. Winner of the 2016 Latin America Amateur Championship

Paul Chaplet (a)

10. Winner of the 2015 U.S. Mid-Amateur

Sammy Schmitz (a)

11. The top 12 finishers and ties in the 2015 Masters Tournament

Paul Casey (16,17,18), Bill Haas (16,17,18), Charley Hoffman (16), Dustin Johnson (12,16,17,18), Hunter Mahan, Hideki Matsuyama (15,16,17,18), Ryan Moore (18), Kevin Na (16,17,18), Ian Poulter, Kevin Streelman

12. Top 4 finishers and ties in the 2015 U.S. Open

Branden Grace (14,17,18), Louis Oosthuizen (13,16,17,18), Cameron Smith

13. Top 4 finishers and ties in the 2015 British Open Championship

Marc Leishman (17,18)

14. Top 4 finishers and ties in the 2015 PGA Championship
15. Winners of PGA Tour events that award a full-point allocation for the FedEx Cup, between the 2015 Masters Tournament and the 2016 Masters Tournament

Steven Bowditch (16), Fabián Gómez, Emiliano Grillo (17,18), Jim Herman, Smylie Kaufman, Chris Kirk, Kevin Kisner (16,17,18), Russell Knox (17,18), Danny Lee (16,17,18), David Lingmerth (18), Davis Love III, Shane Lowry (17,18), Graeme McDowell, Troy Merritt, Brandt Snedeker (16,17,18), Vaughn Taylor, Justin Thomas (17,18)

  • Jim Furyk (16,17,18) was unable to compete due to wrist surgery.[7]
16. All players qualifying for the 2015 edition of The Tour Championship

Daniel Berger, Harris English, J. B. Holmes (17,18), Brooks Koepka (17,18), Matt Kuchar (17,18), Scott Piercy (17,18), Patrick Reed (17,18), Henrik Stenson (17,18), Robert Streb (17), Jimmy Walker (17,18)

  • Bae Sang-moon was unable to compete due to a military obligation in South Korea.[8]
17. Top 50 on the final 2015 Official World Golf Ranking list

An Byeong-hun (18), Kiradech Aphibarnrat (18), Jamie Donaldson, Victor Dubuisson (18), Matthew Fitzpatrick (18), Sergio García (18), Billy Horschel (18), Thongchai Jaidee (18), Søren Kjeldsen (18), Anirban Lahiri (18), Andy Sullivan (18), Lee Westwood, Bernd Wiesberger (18), Danny Willett (18), Chris Wood (18)

18. Top 50 on the Official World Golf Ranking list on March 28, 2016

Rafael Cabrera-Bello

19. International invitees

None

Appearing in their first Masters were Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Daniel Berger, Rafael Cabrera-Bello, Fabián Gómez, Emiliano Grillo, Jim Herman, Smylie Kaufman, Kevin Kisner, Russell Knox, David Lingmerth, Troy Merritt, Cameron Smith, Andy Sullivan, Justin Thomas, and all six amateurs. Four of the amateurs (Bard, Chaplet, Cheng and Schmitz) were appearing in their first major. In addition, An Byeong-hun, Matthew Fitzpatrick, and Danny Lee appeared in their first Masters as professionals. Tom Watson was playing in his final Masters event.

Past champions in the field[edit]

Made the cut[edit]

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 R3 R4 Total To par Place
Jordan Spieth  United States 2015 66 74 73 73 286 −2 T2
Ángel Cabrera  Argentina 2009 73 73 73 75 294 +6 T24
Bernhard Langer  Germany 1985, 1993 72 73 70 79 294 +6 T24
Bubba Watson  United States 2012, 2014 75 75 76 71 297 +9 T37
Adam Scott  Australia 2013 76 72 75 76 299 +11 T42
Larry Mize  United States 1987 76 73 78 74 301 +13 T52

Missed the cut[edit]

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 Total To par
Phil Mickelson  United States 2004, 2006, 2010 72 79 151 +7
Trevor Immelman  South Africa 2008 77 74 151 +7
Zach Johnson  United States 2007 72 80 152 +8
Charl Schwartzel  South Africa 2011 76 76 152 +8
Tom Watson  United States 1977, 1981 74 78 152 +8
Vijay Singh  Fiji 2000 80 73 153 +9
Mike Weir  Canada 2003 76 78 154 +10
Sandy Lyle  Scotland 1988 76 81 157 +13
Mark O'Meara  United States 1998 77 80 157 +13
Ian Woosnam  Wales 1991 82 81 163 +19

Nationalities in the field[edit]

North America (42) South America (3) Europe (26) Oceania (7) Asia (6) Africa (5)
 Canada (1)  Argentina (3)  England (8)  Australia (5)  China (1)  South Africa (5)
 Costa Rica (1)  Northern Ireland (3)  Fiji (1)  India (1)
 United States (40)  Scotland (2)  New Zealand (1)  Japan (1)
 Wales (2)  South Korea (1)
 Ireland (1)  Thailand (2)
 Austria (1)
 Denmark (1)
 France (2)
 Germany (2)
 Spain (2)
 Sweden (2)

Par 3 contest[edit]

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Jimmy Walker won the par 3 contest with a score of 19 (−8), a new tournament record. Nine holes-in-one were made, surpassing the previous record of five set in 2002 and 2015. The players to record an ace were: Rickie Fowler, Zach Johnson, Smylie Kaufman, David Lingmerth, Gary Player, Webb Simpson, Andy Sullivan, Justin Thomas, and Walker.[9][10]

Round summaries[edit]

First round[edit]

Thursday, April 7, 2016

Defending champion Jordan Spieth shot a 6-under-par 66 to take a two-shot lead over Danny Lee and Shane Lowry. His bogey-free round was his ninth consecutive Masters round of par or better. World number one Jason Day was 5-under-par through the front nine but shot 5-over-par on the back nine, including a triple-bogey on the 16th hole, to end at even-par. Ernie Els scored a record-worst nine on the first hole after taking six putts from within three feet and ended his round at 8-over-par. The course played difficult due to windy conditions and the scoring average for the field was 74.16.[11][12][13]

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Jordan Spieth  United States 66 −6
T2 Danny Lee  New Zealand 68 −4
Shane Lowry  Ireland
T4 Paul Casey  England 69 −3
Sergio García  Spain
Søren Kjeldsen  Denmark
Ian Poulter  England
Justin Rose  England
T9 Billy Horschel  United States 70 −2
Rory McIlroy  Northern Ireland
Scott Piercy  United States
Danny Willett  England

Second round[edit]

Friday, April 8, 2016

Jordan Spieth led by as many as five shots but then carded four bogeys and a double bogey and needed a 14-foot par save at the 18th to preserve a one-shot advantage over Rory McIlroy. This was Spieth's sixth consecutive round with the lead at the Masters, tying the record set by Arnold Palmer in 1960–61. Amateur Bryson DeChambeau got to within a shot of the lead but suffered a triple bogey at the last to finish at even-par. Gusting winds led to difficult scoring conditions, with only four players (Daniel Berger, Dustin Johnson, McIlroy, and Troy Merritt) shooting under par, each shooting 71. The scoring average for the round was 75.02, the highest since 2007 and only seven golfers were under par after two rounds.[14] Tom Watson missed the cut in his 43rd and final Masters.

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Jordan Spieth  United States 66-74=140 −4
2 Rory McIlroy  Northern Ireland 70-71=141 −3
T3 Scott Piercy  United States 70-72=142 −2
Danny Lee  New Zealand 68-74=142
T5 Søren Kjeldsen  Denmark 69-74=143 −1
Hideki Matsuyama  Japan 71-72=143
Brandt Snedeker  United States 71-72=143
T8 Kiradech Aphibarnrat  Thailand 72-72=144 E
Daniel Berger  United States 73-71=144
Bryson DeChambeau (a)  United States 72-72=144
Sergio García  Spain 69-75=144
Dustin Johnson  United States 73-71=144
Shane Lowry  Ireland 68-76=144
Danny Willett  England 70-74=144

Amateurs: DeChambeau (E), Langasque (+3), Bard (+9), Schmitz (+12), Cheng (+13), Chaplet (+21)

Third round[edit]

Saturday, April 9, 2016

Jordan Spieth held the lead at the Masters for the seventh consecutive round, a new tournament record, and the third straight year after 54 holes. After a double bogey at the 11th, Spieth rebounded with birdies on three of his next four holes to take a four-shot lead, but then bogeyed the 17th and carded another double bogey on the 18th to post 73 (+1) and drop the lead to one. Smylie Kaufman recorded the lowest score of the round with 69 (−3) and moved into second place. Two-time champion Bernhard Langer, at age 58 attempting to become the oldest major champion, shot a round of 70 and tied Hideki Matsuyama for third, two shots back of Spieth. Rory McIlroy entered the round a shot out of the lead but failed to make a birdie and carded 77 (+5).[15]

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Jordan Spieth  United States 66-74-73=213 −3
2 Smylie Kaufman  United States 73-72-69=214 −2
T3 Bernhard Langer  Germany 72-73-70=215 −1
Hideki Matsuyama  Japan 71-72-72=215
T5 Jason Day  Australia 72-73-71=216 E
Dustin Johnson  United States 73-71-72=216
Danny Willett  England 70-74-72=216
T8 Søren Kjeldsen  Denmark 69-74-74=217 +1
Brandt Snedeker  United States 71-72-74=217
Lee Westwood  England 71-75-71=217

Final round[edit]

Sunday, April 10, 2016

Danny Willett came back from five shots down at the start of the back nine to win his first major title.[16] Jordan Spieth birdied his final four holes of the front-nine to open up a five-shot advantage. After bogeys at the 10th and 11th, Spieth put two balls in the water on the par-3 12th and made quadruple bogey, dropping him to a tie for fourth. Willett, meanwhile, made birdie at 13 and 14 to take the lead. Lee Westwood chipped in for eagle at the 15th to get within one of Willett, but then made bogey on 16 while Willett made birdie. Willett made par on the last two holes to post a round of 67 and five-under for the tournament.[17]

After rebounding with birdies on 13 and 15, Spieth needed to birdie two of his last three holes to tie but missed a 8-foot (2.4 m) birdie at 16 then bogeyed 17 to fall out of contention. Spieth's downfall in the final round capped one of the biggest collapses in Masters history, with many comparing it to the meltdown of Greg Norman at the 1996 Masters.[a] Dustin Johnson also made birdie on 13 and 15 to get within two of Willett, but made double bogey on the 17th. Smylie Kaufman began the round a shot out of the lead but shot 81 (+9) and finished in 29th.[23] For the first time in Masters history, three players (Shane Lowry, Davis Love III, and Louis Oosthuizen) made a hole-in-one on the par-3 16th.[24]

Place Player Country Score To par Money ($)
1 Danny Willett  England 70-74-72-67=283 −5 1,800,000
T2 Jordan Spieth  United States 66-74-73-73=286 −2 880,000
Lee Westwood  England 71-75-71-69=286
T4 Paul Casey  England 69-77-74-67=287 −1 413,333
J. B. Holmes  United States 72-73-74-68=287
Dustin Johnson  United States 73-71-72-71=287
T7 Matthew Fitzpatrick  England 71-76-74-67=288 E 311,667
Søren Kjeldsen  Denmark 69-74-74-71=288
Hideki Matsuyama  Japan 71-72-72-73=288
T10 Daniel Berger  United States 73-71-74-71=289 +1 230,000
Jason Day  Australia 72-73-71-73=289
Rory McIlroy  Northern Ireland 70-71-77-71=289
Justin Rose  England 69-77-73-70=289
Brandt Snedeker  United States 71-72-74-72=289

Amateurs: DeChambeau (+5), Langasque (+10)

Scorecard[edit]

Hole 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Par 4 5 4 3 4 3 4 5 4 4 4 3 5 4 5 3 4 4
England Willett E E E E E −1 −1 −2 −2 −2 −2 −2 −3 −4 −4 −5 −5 −5
United States Spieth −3 −4 −4 −4 −3 −4 −5 −6 −7 −6 −5 −1 −2 −2 −3 −3 −2 −2
England Westwood +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +1 E E −1 E E E −1 −1 −3 −2 −2 −2
England Casey +4 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +1 +1 E E E −1
United States Holmes +2 +3 +4 +5 +4 +4 +4 +3 +3 +3 +3 +2 +1 +1 +1 E E −1
United States Johnson E E E E +2 +1 +1 E −1 −1 −1 −1 −2 −2 −3 −3 −1 −1
Japan Matsuyama E −1 −1 E +1 +3 +3 +2 +2 +1 +1 +1 E E E E E E
Australia Day E E E E +1 +1 +1 E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 E E E +1
Germany Langer E E +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +6
United States Kaufman −2 −3 −2 −1 −1 −1 E E +1 +2 +3 +2 +3 +3 +3 +5 +6 +7

Cumulative tournament scores, relative to par

Eagle Birdie Bogey Double bogey Triple bogey+

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Leader Board - 2016 Masters Tournament". Masters Official Website. April 10, 2016. Retrieved April 10, 2016.
  2. ^ a b Greenstein, Teddy (April 10, 2016). "A Norman-esque collapse leaves Jordan Spieth reeling". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved April 11, 2016.
  3. ^ "The Masters 2016 Leaderboard: Sunday Scores, Results and Analysis". Bleacher Report. April 10, 2016. Retrieved April 10, 2016.
  4. ^ "With this win – Danny Willett". PGA European Tour. April 10, 2016.
  5. ^ Boyette, John (April 3, 2006). "Augusta National's natural beauty was born in nursery". Augusta Chronicle. Archived from the original on August 21, 2014. Retrieved August 27, 2012.
  6. ^ "2016 Masters field: Tiger Woods' withdrawal decreases Augusta qualifiers list to just 89". SB Nation. Vox Media. April 2, 2016.
  7. ^ "Furyk opts for wrist surgery, will miss 3 months and Masters". USA Today. Associated Press. February 2, 2016.
  8. ^ "Sangmoon Bae starts military service, eyes 2017 return to golf". CBS Sports. GolfWeb. November 18, 2015.
  9. ^ Beall, Joel (April 6, 2016). "Jimmy Walker breaks Masters Par-3 Contest scoring record". Golf Digest. Retrieved April 6, 2016.
  10. ^ Kerr-Dineen, Luke (April 6, 2016). "Watch every hole-in-one from this year's Masters par-3 contest". USA Today. Retrieved April 6, 2016.
  11. ^ "Defending champ Jordan Spieth goes bogey-free to lead Masters". ESPN. Associated Press. April 7, 2016.
  12. ^ Harig, Bob (April 7, 2016). "Ernie Els 6-putts from within 3 feet for a record 9 on first hole at Masters". ESPN.
  13. ^ DiMeglio, Steve (April 8, 2016). "Diabolical wind at Augusta giving even veteran golfers fits". USA Today.
  14. ^ "Jordan Spieth has 1-shot lead at Masters despite 'hard golf course'". ESPN. April 8, 2016. Retrieved April 9, 2016.
  15. ^ "Jordan Spieth maintains 1-shot Masters lead despite messy finish". ESPN. Associated Press. April 9, 2016. Retrieved April 9, 2016.
  16. ^ "Danny Willett wins Masters 2016: All you need to know about England's Augusta champion". Daily Telegraph. April 11, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2016.
  17. ^ "Masters 2016: Danny Willett wins after Jordan Spieth's disaster at the 12th". The Guardian. April 11, 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2016.
  18. ^ Brennan, Christine (April 11, 2016). "Brennan: Jordan Spieth's collapse is one we won't soon forge". USA Today. Retrieved April 13, 2016.
  19. ^ Strege, John (April 11, 2016). "Jordan Spieth's 12th-hole collapse: 'Nothing…harder on the eyes' in golf history". Golf Digest. Retrieved April 13, 2016.
  20. ^ Plaschke, Bill (April 10, 2016). "Trying to play it safe, Jordan Spieth plays his way into a historic collapse at the Masters". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved April 13, 2016.
  21. ^ Weinreb, Michael (April 11, 2016). "The Agony of Jordan Spieth: Can He Recover From His Masters Collapse?". Rolling Stone. Retrieved April 13, 2016.
  22. ^ Bort, Ryan (April 11, 2016). "Where Does Jordan Spieth's Masters Collapse Rank?". Newsweek. USA Today Sports via Reuters. Retrieved April 13, 2016.
  23. ^ "Danny Willett wins Masters after Jordan Spieth's collapse". ESPN. Associated Press. April 10, 2016. Retrieved April 10, 2016.
  24. ^ "Shane Lowry, Davis Love III and Louis Oosthuizen ace 16th hole at Augusta". ESPN. April 10, 2016. Retrieved April 10, 2016.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
2015 PGA Championship
Major Championships Succeeded by
2016 U.S. Open

Coordinates: 33°30′11″N 82°01′12″W / 33.503°N 82.020°W / 33.503; -82.020