UEFA Futsal Euro 2016

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UEFA Futsal Euro 2016
Европско првенство у футсалу 2016
Evropsko prvenstvo u futsalu 2016
UEFA Futsal Euro 2016.png
Logo of UEFA Futsal Euro 2016
Tournament details
Host country Serbia
CityBelgrade
Dates2–13 February 2016
Teams12 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s)1 (in 1 host city)
Final positions
Champions Spain (7th title)
Runners-up Russia
Third place Kazakhstan
Fourth place Serbia
Tournament statistics
Matches played20
Goals scored129 (6.45 per match)
Attendance113,961 (5,698 per match)
Top scorer(s)Kazakhstan Serik Zhamankulov
Portugal Ricardinho
Spain Álex
Spain Miguelín
Spain Mario Rivillos
(6 goals each)
Best player(s)Spain Miguelín
2014
2018

The 2016 UEFA Futsal Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Futsal Euro 2016, was the 10th edition of the UEFA Futsal Championship, the biennial international futsal championship organised by UEFA for the men's national teams of Europe. It was hosted for the first time in Serbia, following a decision of the UEFA Executive Committee on 20 March 2012.[1] Serbia was chosen ahead of other bids from Bulgaria and Macedonia.

The final tournament was contested from 2 to 13 February 2016 by twelve teams, eleven of which joined the hosts Serbia after overcoming a qualifying tournament. The matches were played in the Belgrade Arena in the city of Belgrade.

Qualification[edit]

A total of 46 UEFA nations entered the competition (including Scotland which entered for the first time), and with the hosts Serbia qualifying automatically, the other 45 teams competed in the qualifying competition to determine the remaining 11 spots in the final tournament.[2] The qualifying competition, which took place from January to September 2015, consisted of three rounds:[3]

  • Preliminary round: The 24 lowest-ranked teams were drawn into six groups of four teams. Each group was played in single round-robin format at one of the pre-selected hosts. The six group winners and the best runner-up advanced to the main round.
  • Main round: The 28 teams (21 highest-ranked teams and seven preliminary round qualifiers) were drawn into seven groups of four teams. Each group was played in single round-robin format at one of the pre-selected hosts. The seven group winners qualified directly to the final tournament, while the seven runners-up and the best third-placed team advanced to the play-offs.
  • Play-offs: The eight teams were drawn into four ties to play home-and-away two-legged matches to determine the last four qualified teams.

Qualified teams[edit]

The following 12 teams qualified for the final tournament.

Team Method of qualification Finals appearance Last appearance Previous best performance
 Serbia Hosts 5th 2012 Quarter-finals (2010, 2012)
 Russia Main round Group 1 winners 10th 2014 Champions (1999)
 Spain Main round Group 2 winners 10th 2014 Champions (1996, 2001, 2005, 2007, 2010, 2012)
 Italy Main round Group 3 winners 10th 2014 Champions (2003, 2014)
 Ukraine Main round Group 4 winners 9th 2014 Runners-up (2001, 2003)
 Slovenia Main round Group 5 winners 5th 2014 Quarter-finals (2014)
 Croatia Main round Group 6 winners 5th 2014 Fourth place (2012)
 Portugal Main round Group 7 winners 8th 2014 Runners-up (2010)
 Hungary Play-off winners 3rd 2010 Group stage (2005, 2010)
 Kazakhstan Play-off winners 1st Debut
 Czech Republic Play-off winners 8th 2014 Semi-finals (2003), Third place (2010)
 Azerbaijan Play-off winners 4th 2014 Fourth place (2010)

Final draw[edit]

The final draw was held on 2 October 2015, 12:00 CEST (UTC+2), at the Belgrade Town Hall in Belgrade, Serbia,[4] where former Serbian footballer Dejan Stanković was unveiled as the tournament ambassador and made the draw.[5] The 12 teams were drawn into four groups of three teams. The teams were seeded according to their coefficient ranking, with the hosts Serbia (assigned to position A1 in the draw) and the title holders Italy automatically placed into Pot 1.[6]

Each group contained one team from Pot 1, one team from Pot 2, and one team from Pot 3. For political reasons, Russia and Ukraine could not be drawn in the same group or in groups scheduled to be played on the same day (due to a potential clash of teams and clash of fans). Therefore, if Russia were drawn in Group B, Ukraine had to be drawn in Group C or D, and if Russia were drawn in Group C or D, Ukraine had to be drawn in Group A or B.[7]

Pot 1
Team Coeff Rank
 Serbia (hosts) 4.528 8
 Italy (holders) 8.278 2
 Spain 8.410 1
 Russia 8.167 3
Pot 2
Team Coeff Rank
 Portugal 7.000 4
 Ukraine 5.889 5
 Croatia 4.667 6
 Czech Republic 4.528 7
Pot 3
Team Coeff Rank
 Slovenia 4.167 10
 Azerbaijan 3.722 11
 Hungary 2.667 12
 Kazakhstan 1.667 19

Venues[edit]

Belgrade is located in Serbia
Belgrade
Belgrade
Location of the 2016 UEFA Futsal Euro final tournament host city in Serbia

All matches were played at the Kombank Arena. During the course of the championship, the arena was renamed from Kombank Arena to Belgrade Arena, for sponsorship reasons.[8][9] Originally the Pionir Arena was proposed to host group stage matches.

Venue Belgrade Arena
Capacity 11,161
Image Belgrade Arena south-west.jpg

Squads[edit]

Each national team have to submit a squad of 14 players, two of whom must be goalkeepers. If a player is injured or ill severely enough to prevent his participation in the tournament before his team's first match, he can be replaced by another player.[3]

Group stage[edit]

The schedule of the tournament was confirmed on 28 October 2015.[10]

The group winners and runners-up advanced to the quarter-finals.

Tiebreakers

The teams were ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss). If two or more teams were equal on points on completion of the group matches, the following tie-breaking criteria were applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings:[3]

  1. Higher number of points obtained in the group matches played among the teams in question;
  2. Superior goal difference resulting from the group matches played among the teams in question;
  3. Higher number of goals scored in the group matches played among the teams in question;
  4. If, after having applied criteria 1 to 3, teams still had an equal ranking, criteria 1 to 3 were reapplied exclusively to the group matches between the teams in question to determine their final rankings. If this procedure did not lead to a decision, criteria 5 to 9 applied;
  5. Superior goal difference in all group matches;
  6. Higher number of goals scored in all group matches;
  7. If only two teams had the same number of points, and they were tied according to criteria 1 to 6 after having met in the last round of the group stage, their rankings were determined by a penalty shoot-out (not used if more than two teams had the same number of points, or if their rankings were not relevant for qualification for the next stage).
  8. Lower disciplinary points total based only on yellow and red cards received in the group matches (red card = 3 points, yellow card = 1 point, expulsion for two yellow cards in one match = 3 points);
  9. Drawing of lots.

All times were local, CET (UTC+1).[11]

Group A[edit]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Serbia (H) 2 2 0 0 8 2 +6 6 Knockout stage
2  Portugal 2 1 0 1 7 5 +2 3
3  Slovenia 2 0 0 2 3 11 −8 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
(H) Host.
Serbia 5–1 Slovenia
Janjić Goal 14' (pen.)
Kocić Goal 21'30'
Rajčević Goal 27'
Pršić Goal 34'
Report Osredkar Goal 3'
Attendance: 11,161[12]
Referee: Ondřej Černý (Czech Republic), Alessandro Malfer (Italy)

Slovenia 2–6 Portugal
Čujec Goal 3'
Vrhovec Goal 20'
Report Fábio Cecílio Goal 5'40'
Ricardinho Goal 16'24'33'
Pedro Cary Goal 31'
Attendance: 2,270[12]
Referee: Ivan Shabanov (Russia), Saša Tomić (Croatia)

Portugal 1–3 Serbia
Ricardinho Goal 15' Report Kocić Goal 8'
Rajčević Goal 37'
Simić Goal 40'
Attendance: 11,161[12]
Referee: Fernando Gutiérrez Lumbreras (Spain), Pascal Lemal (Belgium)

Group B[edit]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Spain 2 2 0 0 9 3 +6 6 Knockout stage
2  Ukraine 2 1 0 1 7 7 0 3
3  Hungary 2 0 0 2 5 11 −6 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Spain 5–2 Hungary
Németh Goal 8' (o.g.)
Bebe Goal 15'
Miguelín Goal 20'29'
Andresito Goal 36'
Report Dróth Goal 24'38'
Attendance: 5,100[12]
Referee: Saša Tomić (Croatia), Bogdan Sorescu (Romania)

Hungary 3–6 Ukraine
Dróth Goal 8'34'
Trencsényi Goal 30'
Report D. Sorokin Goal 2'
Bondar Goal 7'35'
Ovsyannikov Goal 25'
Myko. Grytsyna Goal 30'
Valenko Goal 36'
Attendance: 2,445[12]
Referee: Gerald Bauernfeind (Austria), Eduardo Fernandes Coelho (Portugal)

Ukraine 1–4 Spain
Myko. Grytsyna Goal 38' Report Álex Goal 20'34'
Rivillos Goal 30'40'
Attendance: 9,850[12]
Referee: Alessandro Malfer (Italy), Kamil Çetin (Turkey)

Group C[edit]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Russia 2 1 1 0 4 3 +1 4 Knockout stage
2  Kazakhstan 2 1 0 1 5 4 +1 3
3  Croatia 2 0 1 1 4 6 −2 1
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Russia 2–1 Kazakhstan
Romulo Goal 12'12' Report Zhamankulov Goal 13'
Attendance: 2,115[12]
Referee: Eduardo Fernandes Coelho (Portugal), Fernando Gutiérrez Lumbreras (Spain)

Kazakhstan 4–2 Croatia
Douglas Goal 6'
Suleimanov Goal 7'
Zhamankulov Goal 17'27'
Report Matošević Goal 7'
Suton Goal 33'
Attendance: 1,555[12]
Referee: Oleg Ivanov (Ukraine), Gábor Kovács (Hungary)

Croatia 2–2 Russia
Robinho Goal 9' (o.g.)
Novak Goal 25'
Report Abramov Goal 12'
Pereverzev Goal 39'
Attendance: 1,550[12]
Referee: Cédric Pelissier (France), Admir Zahovič (Slovenia)

Group D[edit]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Italy 2 2 0 0 10 0 +10 6 Knockout stage
2  Azerbaijan 2 1 0 1 6 8 −2 3
3  Czech Republic 2 0 0 2 5 13 −8 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Italy 3–0 Azerbaijan
Alex Merlim Goal 20'21'
Giasson Goal 29'
Report
Attendance: 2,200[12]
Referee: Marc Birkett (England), Oleg Ivanov (Ukraine)

Azerbaijan 6–5 Czech Republic
Farzaliyev Goal 6'
Borisov Goal 7'
De Araujo Goal 12'
Eduardo Goal 20'
Augusto Goal 27'
Rafael Goal 40'
Report Záruba Goal 10'
Holý Goal 12'
Rešetár Goal 16'
Novotný Goal 24'
Kovács Goal 31'
Attendance: 1,756[12]
Referee: Admir Zahovič (Slovenia), Gerald Bauernfeind (Austria)

Czech Republic 0–7 Italy
Report Fortino Goal 1'22'
Gabriel Lima Goal 11'
Alex Merlim Goal 21'
Koudelka Goal 22' (o.g.)
Honorio Goal 24'
Patias Goal 33'
Attendance: 1,020[12]
Referee: Timo Onatsu (Finland), Ivan Shabanov (Russia)

Knockout stage[edit]

If a match was drawn after 40 minutes of regular play, an extra time consisting of two five-minute periods would be played. If teams were still leveled after extra time, a penalty shoot-out would be used to determine the winner. In the third place match, the extra time would be skipped and the decision would go directly to kicks from the penalty mark.[3]

Bracket[edit]

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
8 February – Belgrade
 
 
 Serbia2
 
11 February – Belgrade
 
 Ukraine1
 
 Serbia2
 
9 February – Belgrade
 
 Russia (a.e.t.)3
 
 Russia6
 
13 February – Belgrade
 
 Azerbaijan2
 
 Russia3
 
8 February – Belgrade
 
 Spain7
 
 Portugal2
 
11 February – Belgrade
 
 Spain6
 
 Spain5
 
9 February – Belgrade
 
 Kazakhstan3 Third place
 
 Kazakhstan5
 
13 February – Belgrade
 
 Italy2
 
 Serbia2
 
 
 Kazakhstan5
 

Quarter-finals[edit]

Serbia 2–1 Ukraine
Kocić Goal 2'
Simić Goal 40'
Report Myko. Grytsyna Goal 24'
Attendance: 11,161[12]
Referee: Bogdan Sorescu (Romania), Marc Birkett (England)

Portugal 2–6 Spain
Ricardinho Goal 23'26' Report Miguelín Goal 13' (pen.)
Rivillos Goal 15'40'
Álex Goal 18'35'
Raúl Campos Goal 23'
Attendance: 8,850[12]
Referee: Gábor Kovács (Hungary), Ondřej Černý (Czech Republic)

Russia 6–2 Azerbaijan
Abramov Goal 7'26'
Romulo Goal 15'
Eder Lima Goal 25'39'40'
Report Augusto Goal 8'29'
Attendance: 2,205[12]
Referee: Pascal Lemal (Belgium), Timo Onatsu (Finland)

Kazakhstan 5–2 Italy
Leo Goal 16'40'
Zhamankulov Goal 19'
Yesenamanov Goal 23'
Nurgozhin Goal 37'
Report Fortino Goal 23'
Canal Goal 37'
Attendance: 1,740[12]
Referee: Kamil Çetin (Turkey), Cédric Pelissier (France)

Semi-finals[edit]

Serbia 2–3 (a.e.t.) Russia
Kocić Goal 26'
Simić Goal 36'
Report Eder Lima Goal 13'
Abramov Goal 33'
Romulo Goal 44'
Attendance: 11,161[12]
Referee: Marc Birkett (England), Ondřej Černý (Czech Republic)

Spain 5–3 Kazakhstan
Bebe Goal 8'
Miguelín Goal 17'
Raúl Campos Goal 18'39'
Álex Goal 27'
Report Dovgan Goal 4'
Leo Goal 36'
Zhamankulov Goal 38'
Attendance: 7,150[12]
Referee: Saša Tomić (Croatia), Eduardo Fernandes Coelho (Portugal)

Third place match[edit]

Serbia 2–5 Kazakhstan
Rakić Goal 38'
Rajčević Goal 40'
Report Douglas Goal 20'30'34'
Zhamankulov Goal 21'
Higuita Goal 32'
Attendance: 11,161[12]
Referee: Pascal Lemal (Belgium), Kamil Çetin (Turkey)

Final[edit]

Russia 3–7 Spain
Romulo Goal 20'
Robinho Goal 32'
Milovanov Goal 40'
Report Álex Goal 9'
Pola Goal 16'17'
Rivillos Goal 17'36'
Miguelín Goal 31'35'
Attendance: 8,350[12]
Referee: Alessandro Malfer (Italy), Bogdan Sorescu (Romania)

Final ranking[edit]

Goalscorers[edit]

6 goals
5 goals
4 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal
1 own goal

Source: UEFA.com[13]

Awards[edit]

Sponsorship[edit]

Global sponsors National sponsors

Broadcasters[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Serbia to stage Futsal EURO 2016". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). 20 March 2012. Retrieved 28 December 2014.
  2. ^ "Scotland among record Futsal EURO entry". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). Retrieved 28 December 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d "Regulations of the UEFA European Futsal Championship, 2015–16" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  4. ^ "Final tournament draw". UEFA.com. Retrieved 2 October 2015.
  5. ^ "UEFA Futsal EURO finals draw made". UEFA.com. 2 October 2015.
  6. ^ "Seedings set for Futsal EURO draw". UEFA.com. 28 September 2015.
  7. ^ "Final tournament draw procedure" (PDF).
  8. ^ "Belgrade Arena". UEFA. 2015-09-25. Retrieved 2016-01-31.
  9. ^ "UEFA prekrstila "Arenu"!". Večernje novosti. 2016-01-08. Retrieved 2016-01-31.
  10. ^ "UEFA Futsal EURO finals Belgrade schedule". UEFA.com. 28 October 2015.
  11. ^ "Final tournament schedule" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u "UEFA Futsal EURO 2016 tournament review" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  13. ^ "UEFA Futsal Euro 2016 – Tournament phase – Player statistics – Goals". UEFA.com. Retrieved 13 February 2016.
  14. ^ "Golden Player – 2016: Miguelín". UEFA.com.
  15. ^ a b c "Spain's Miguelín and Rivillos share Golden Shoe". UEFA.com. 13 February 2016.
  16. ^ "adidas on board for UEFA EURO 2012". UEFA.com. Retrieved 3 February 2016. The long-term partnership between UEFA and adidas is to continue with rights granted to UEFA EURO 2012™ and 2016™ plus all other national-team competitions until 2017.
  17. ^ UEFA. "Carlsberg signs as Official Sponsor for UEFA national team competitions". UEFA.com. Retrieved 3 February 2016.
  18. ^ "Coca-Cola signs for Euro 2012, 2016". UEFA.org. Union of European Football Associations. 22 February 2010. Retrieved 3 February 2016.
  19. ^ "Continental to sponsor Euro 2012 and 2016". UEFA.org. Union of European Football Associations. 20 October 2011. Retrieved 3 February 2016.
  20. ^ "Hisense signs as UEFA EURO 2016 global sponsor". UEFA.org. UEFA. 14 January 2016. Retrieved 3 February 2016.
  21. ^ "Hyundai-Kia joins as official sponsor for UEFA Euro 2012™ and UEFA Euro 2016™". UEFA.org. Union of European Football Associations. 2 March 2010. Retrieved 3 February 2016.
  22. ^ "McDonald's signed up as official Euro sponsor". UEFA.org. Union of European Football Associations. 26 May 2010. Retrieved 3 February 2016.
  23. ^ "UEFA 2016 Futsal Championship". MONDO Sport&Flooring. MONDOWorldwide.com. Retrieved 3 February 2016.
  24. ^ "SOCAR signs as Official Sponsor for UEFA national team competitions". UEFA.com. Retrieved 3 February 2016.
  25. ^ "Turkish Airlines joins UEFA EURO 2016 as Official Airline Partner". UEFA.org. Retrieved 3 February 2016.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Where to watch UEFA Futsal EURO 2016". UEFA.com. Retrieved 3 February 2016.
  27. ^ شبکه ورزش
  28. ^ Geraldes, Ivo (13 January 2016). "Campeonato da Europa de futsal transmitido pela TVI". Diário de Notícias (in Portuguese). Global Media Group. Retrieved 20 January 2016.
  29. ^ [1]

External links[edit]