2016 US Open (tennis)

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2016 US Open
Date August 29 – September 11
Edition 136th
Category Grand Slam (ITF)
Draw 128S/64D/32X
Prize money $46,300,000
Surface Hard
Location New York City, New York, United States
Venue USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center
Champions
Men's Singles
Switzerland Stan Wawrinka
Women's Singles
Germany Angelique Kerber
Men's Doubles
Brazil Bruno Soares / United Kingdom Jamie Murray
Women's Doubles
United States Bethanie Mattek-Sands / Czech Republic Lucie Šafářová
Mixed Doubles
Germany Laura Siegemund / Croatia Mate Pavić
Boys' Singles
Canada Félix Auger-Aliassime
Girls' Singles
United States Kayla Day
Boys' Doubles
Bolivia Juan Carlos Aguilar / Brazil Felipe Meligeni Alves
Girls' Doubles
United States Jada Hart / United States Ena Shibahara
Men's Champions Invitational
Australia Pat Cash / Australia Mark Philippoussis
Women's Champions Invitational
United States Lindsay Davenport / United States Mary Joe Fernández
← 2015 · US Open · 2017 →

The 2016 US Open was the 136th edition of tennis' US Open, the fourth and final Grand Slam event of the year. It took place on outdoor hard courts at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York City.

In the men's singles competition, Stan Wawrinka defeated defending champion Novak Djokovic in the final.

Angelique Kerber defeated Karolína Plíšková in the women's singles to become the first German player to win the tournament since Steffi Graf in 1996. 2015 women's singles champion Flavia Pennetta did not defend her title as she had retired at the end of the 2015 season.

This tournament turned out to be the last one in the career of former No.1 player in the world and 2008 French Open women's singles champion Ana Ivanovic, who announced her retirement from professional tennis at the end of the year.

Tournament[edit]

Arthur Ashe Stadium before the retractable roof was installed and where the finals of the US Open took place

The 2016 US Open was the 136th edition of the tournament and it was held at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park of Queens in New York City, New York, United States.

The tournament was an event run by the International Tennis Federation (ITF) and was part of the 2016 ATP World Tour and the 2016 WTA Tour calendars under the Grand Slam category. The tournament consists of both men's and women's singles and doubles draws as well as a mixed doubles event. There are also singles and doubles events for both boys and girls (players under 18), which is part of the Grade A category of tournaments.

In addition, the annual men's and women's Champions Invitational doubles events were held, with eight male and eight female former Grand Slam champions taking part. For the third year running, the American Collegiate Invitational competitions were organized, where top sixteen American collegiate players compete in men's and women's singles events. Exhibition matches also took place.

Due to the 2016 Summer Paralympics, no usual singles, doubles and quad events for men's and women's wheelchair tennis players as part of the UNIQLO tour under the Grand Slam category will be played.

The tournament was played on hard courts and takes place over a series of 16 courts with DecoTurf surface, including the three main showcourts – Arthur Ashe Stadium, Louis Armstrong Stadium and the new Grandstand. It was the first US Open played on courts with operational roofs, on centre court and on the newly built Grandstand stadium. The Ashe roof was expected to be used only for rain, unlike the Australian Open, which also closes its roof in cases of extreme heat.[1] It was also be the last tournament before the demolition of the Louis Armstrong Stadium and old Grandstand. Although Arthur Ashe Stadium and the new Grandstand will be the existing main stadiums for the 2017 edition.

For the second year running, the US Open is scheduled across 14 days, rather than the 15-day schedule of 2013 and 2014, which has impact on all senior events. Women's singles semifinals have been scheduled for September 8 evening session, while men's singles semifinal matches was played on Friday September 9. The men's doubles final was played before the women's singles final on Saturday September 10, and the men's singles final followed the women's doubles final on Sunday September 11.

Broadcast[edit]

In the United States, the 2016 US Open was the second under a new, 11-year, $825 million contract with ESPN, in which the broadcaster holds exclusive rights to the entire tournament and the US Open Series. This means that the tournament was not available on broadcast television. This also makes ESPN the exclusive U.S. broadcaster for three of the four tennis majors.[2][3][4]

Live action from a total of twelve courts was available this year (Arthur Ashe Stadium, Louis Armstrong Stadium, Grandstand, Court 4, Court 5, Court 6, Court 9, Court 11, Court 12, Court 13, Court 17 and Court P6/Old Grandstand), an increase from eleven in 2015.

Point and prize money distribution[edit]

Point distribution[edit]

Below is a series of tables for each of the competitions showing the ranking points on offer for each event.

Senior[edit]

Event W F SF QF Round of 16 Round of 32 Round of 64 Round of 128 Q Q3 Q2 Q1
Men's Singles 2000 1200 720 360 180 90 45 10 25 16 8 0
Men's Doubles 0 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Women's Singles 1300 780 430 240 130 70 10 40 30 20 2
Women's Doubles 10 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Prize money[edit]

The total prize-money compensation for the 2016 US Open is $46.3 million, a 10% increase on the same total last year. Of that total, a record $3.5 million goes to both the men's and women's singles champions. This made the US Open the most lucrative and highest paying tennis grand slam in the world, leapfrogging Wimbledon in total prize money fund. Prize money for the US Open qualifying tournament is also up 10 percent, to $1.9 million.[5][6]

Event W F SF QF Round of 16 Round of 32 Round of 64 Round of 128 Q3 Q2 Q1
Singles $3,500,000 $1,750,000 $875,000 $450,000 $235,000 $140,000 $77,188 $43,313 $16,350 $10,900 $5,606
Doubles [a] $625,000 $310,000 $150,000 $75,000 $40,000 $24,500 $15,141 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Mixed Doubles [a] $150,000 $70,000 $30,000 $15,000 $10,000 $5,000 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

On top of listed above, $600,000 will contribute Champions Invitational events prize money, while $1,478,000 is estimated as players' per diem. A total of men's and women's singles prize money ($36,324,000) will account for more than 78% of total player compensation, while doubles ($5,463,000) and mixed doubles ($500,000) – for 12% and 1%, respectively.

Bonus prize money[edit]

The top three men's and top three women's finishers in the 2016 US Open Series also earn bonus prize money at the US Open, with the champions of the Series Bonus Challenge having the opportunity to win $1 million in addition to their tournament prize money.[7]

2016 Emirates Airline US Open Series Finish 2016 US Open Finish Awardees
W F SF QF Round of 16 Round of 32 Round of 64 Round of 128
1st Place $1,000,000 $500,000 $250,000 $125,000 $70,000 $40,000 $25,000 $15,000 Japan Kei Nishikori $250,000
Poland Agnieszka Radwańska $70,000
2nd Place $500,000 $250,000 $125,000 $62,500 $35,000 $20,000 $12,500 $7,500 Bulgaria Grigor Dimitrov $35,000
United Kingdom Johanna Konta $35,000
3rd Place $250,000 $125,000 $62,500 $31,250 $17,500 $10,000 $6,250 $3,750 Canada Milos Raonic $6,250
Romania Simona Halep $31,250

Singles players[edit]

2016 US Open – Men's Singles
2016 US Open – Women's Singles

Day-by-day summaries[edit]

Before the tournament[edit]

Day 1[edit]

Day 3[edit]

Day 7[edit]

  • Lucas Pouille defeated 14-time Slam champion Rafael Nadal in five sets, marking the first time since 2004 that Nadal failed to reach the Grand Slam quarterfinal at least in a single season. Pouille advanced to his first US Open quarterfinal.[15]
  • Sevastova became the first Latvian woman to reach the US Open quarterfinal after she defeated Johanna Konta in the fourth round. She is the first Latvian female quarterfinalist since Larisa Neiland in 1994 Wimbledon Championships.[16]
  • French veterans Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and Gaël Monfils were advanced to the quarterfinals as well, joined compatriot Pouille at the top half of the men's singles draw, making them the first time three French quarterfinalists at the US Open.[17]

Day 8[edit]

Day 9[edit]

  • In the men's draw, Novak Djokovic is the only player from the Big Four advanced to the semifinal after Jo-Wilfried Tsonga retired due to his left knee. This meant the first time since 2004 French Open neither Federer, Nadal and Andy Murray moved to the semifinal.[20]

Day 11[edit]

Singles seeds[edit]

Seeds are based on the ATP and WTA rankings as of 22 August 2016. Rank and points before are as of 29 August 2016.

Men's Singles[edit]

Seed Rank Player Points
before
Points
defending
Points
won
Points
after
Status
1 1 Serbia Novak Djokovic 14,840 2,000 1,200 14,040 Runner-up, lost to Switzerland Stan Wawrinka [3]
2 2 United Kingdom Andy Murray 9,305 180 360 9,485 Quarterfinals lost to Japan Kei Nishikori [6]
3 3 Switzerland Stan Wawrinka 4,980 720 2,000 6,260 Champion, defeated Serbia Novak Djokovic [1]
4 5 Spain Rafael Nadal 4,850 90 180 4,940 Fourth round lost to France Lucas Pouille [24]
5 6 Canada Milos Raonic 4,805 90 45 4,760 Second round lost to United States Ryan Harrison [Q]
6 7 Japan Kei Nishikori 4,165 10 720 4,875 Semifinals lost to Switzerland Stan Wawrinka [3]
7 9 Croatia Marin Čilić 3,515 720 90 2,885 Third round lost to United States Jack Sock [26]
8 10 Austria Dominic Thiem 3,205 90 180 3,295 Fourth round retired vs. Argentina Juan Martín del Potro [WC]
9 11 France Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 2,875 360 360 2,875 Quarterfinals retired vs. Serbia Novak Djokovic [1]
10 12 France Gaël Monfils 2,835 10 720 3,545 Semifinals lost to Serbia Novak Djokovic [1]
11 13 Spain David Ferrer 2,660 90 90 2,660 Third round lost to Argentina Juan Martín del Potro [WC]
12 14 Belgium David Goffin 2,565 90 10 2,485 First round lost to United States Jared Donaldson [Q]
13 15 France Richard Gasquet 2,230 360 10 1,880 First round lost to United Kingdom Kyle Edmund
14 16 Australia Nick Kyrgios 2,060 10 90 2,140 Third round retired vs. Ukraine Illya Marchenko
15 17 Spain Roberto Bautista Agut 2,040 180 90 1,950 Third round lost to France Lucas Pouille [24]
16 18 Spain Feliciano López 1,840 360 45 1,525 Second round lost to Portugal João Sousa
17 19 Australia Bernard Tomic 1,780 90 10 1,700 First round lost to Bosnia and Herzegovina Damir Džumhur
18 20 Uruguay Pablo Cuevas 1,745 45 45 1,745 Second round lost to Spain Nicolás Almagro
19 22 United States Steve Johnson 1,635 10 45 1,670 Second round lost to Argentina Juan Martín del Potro [WC]
20 21 United States John Isner 1,645 180 90 1,555 Third round lost to United Kingdom Kyle Edmund
21 23 Croatia Ivo Karlović 1,570 45 180 1,705 Fourth round lost to Japan Kei Nishikori [6]
22 24 Bulgaria Grigor Dimitrov 1,555 45 180 1,690 Fourth round lost to United Kingdom Andy Murray [2]
23 35 South Africa Kevin Anderson 1,275 360 90 1,005 Third round lost to France Jo-Wilfried Tsonga [9]
24 25 France Lucas Pouille 1,481 10 360 1,831 Quarterfinals lost to France Gaël Monfils [10]
25 26 Germany Philipp Kohlschreiber 1,475 90 10 1,395 First round retired vs. France Nicolas Mahut
26 27 United States Jack Sock 1,450 45 180 1,585 Fourth round lost to France Jo-Wilfried Tsonga [9]
27 28 Germany Alexander Zverev 1,415 35 45 1,425 Second round lost to United Kingdom Daniel Evans
28 29 Slovakia Martin Kližan 1,405 45 10 1,370 First round lost to Russia Mikhail Youzhny
29 30 United States Sam Querrey 1,400 10 10 1,400 First round lost to Serbia Janko Tipsarević [PR]
30 31 France Gilles Simon 1,385 10 45 1,420 Second round lost to Italy Paolo Lorenzi
31 33 Spain Albert Ramos-Viñolas 1,330 10+45 45+20 1,340 Second round lost to Russia Andrey Kuznetsov
32 34 France Benoît Paire 1,305 180 45 1,170 Second round lost to Cyprus Marcos Baghdatis

Withdrawn players[edit]

Rank Player Points before Points defending Points won Points after Withdrawal reason
4 Switzerland Roger Federer 4,945 1,200 0 3,745 Knee injury[23]
8 Czech Republic Tomáš Berdych 3,570 180 0 3,390 Appendicitis[24]

Women's Singles[edit]

Seed Rank Player Points
before
Points
defending
Points
won
Points
after
Status
1 1 United States Serena Williams 7,050 780 780 7,050 Semifinals lost to Czech Republic Karolína Plíšková [10]
2 2 Germany Angelique Kerber 6,860 130 2,000 8,730 Champion, defeated Czech Republic Karolína Plíšková [10]
3 3 Spain Garbiñe Muguruza 5,830 70 70 5,830 Second round lost to Latvia Anastasija Sevastova
4 4 Poland Agnieszka Radwańska 5,705 130 240 5,815 Fourth round lost to Croatia Ana Konjuh
5 5 Romania Simona Halep 5,151 780 430 4,801 Quarterfinals lost to United States Serena Williams [1]
6 6 United States Venus Williams 4,005 430 240 3,815 Fourth round lost to Czech Republic Karolína Plíšková [10]
7 8 Italy Roberta Vinci 3,465 1,300 430 2,595 Quarterfinals lost to Germany Angelique Kerber [2]
8 9 United States Madison Keys 3,286 240 240 3,286 Fourth round lost to Denmark Caroline Wozniacki
9 10 Russia Svetlana Kuznetsova 3,190 10 70 3,250 Second round lost to Denmark Caroline Wozniacki
10 11 Czech Republic Karolína Plíšková 3,135 10 1,300 4,425 Runner-up, lost to Germany Angelique Kerber [2]
11 12 Spain Carla Suárez Navarro 3,100 10 240 3,330 Fourth round lost to Romania Simona Halep [5]
12 13 Slovakia Dominika Cibulková 3,100 130 130 3,100 Third round lost to Ukraine Lesia Tsurenko
13 14 United Kingdom Johanna Konta 2,905 280 240 2,865 Fourth round lost to Latvia Anastasija Sevastova
14 16 Czech Republic Petra Kvitová 2,580 430 240 2,390 Fourth round lost to Germany Angelique Kerber [2]
15 15 Switzerland Timea Bacsinszky 2,713 10 70 2,773 Second round lost to United States Varvara Lepchenko
16 17 Australia Samantha Stosur 2,370 240 70 2,200 Second round lost to China Zhang Shuai
17 18 Russia Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova 2,195 70 130 2,255 Third round lost to Czech Republic Karolína Plíšková [10]
18 21 Czech Republic Barbora Strýcová 2,050 130 10 1,930 First round lost to Romania Monica Niculescu
19 20 Russia Elena Vesnina 2,054 70 130 2,114 Third round lost to Spain Carla Suárez Navarro [11]
20 22 Netherlands Kiki Bertens 1,945 110 10 1,845 First round lost to Croatia Ana Konjuh
21 23 Romania Irina-Camelia Begu 1,835 10 10 1,835 First round lost to Ukraine Lesia Tsurenko
22 19 Ukraine Elina Svitolina 2,101 130 130 2,101 Third round lost to Czech Republic Petra Kvitová [14]
23 24 Russia Daria Kasatkina 1,773 130 10 1,653 First round lost to China Wang Qiang
24 26 Switzerland Belinda Bencic 1,602 130 130 1,602 Third round lost to United Kingdom Johanna Konta [13]
25 33 France Caroline Garcia 1,555 10 130 1,675 Third round lost to Poland Agnieszka Radwańska [4]
26 27 Germany Laura Siegemund 1,600 40+140 130+13 1,563 Third round lost to United States Venus Williams [6]
27 28 Italy Sara Errani 1,590 130 10 1,470 First round lost to United States Shelby Rogers
28 30 United States Coco Vandeweghe 1,561 70 10 1,501 First round lost to Japan Naomi Osaka
29 31 Serbia Ana Ivanovic 1,560 10 10 1,560 First round lost to Czech Republic Denisa Allertová
30 32 Japan Misaki Doi 1,555 70 10 1,495 First round lost to Germany Carina Witthöft
31 34 Hungary Tímea Babos 1,510 10 130 1,630 Third round lost to Romania Simona Halep [5]
32 35 Puerto Rico Monica Puig 1,500 10 10 1,500 First round lost to China Zheng Saisai

Withdrawn players[edit]

Rank Player Points before Points defending Points won Points after Withdrawal reason
7 Belarus Victoria Azarenka 3,551 430 0 3,121 Pregnancy[25]
25 United States Sloane Stephens 1,612 10 0 1,602 Right foot injury[26]

Doubles seeds[edit]

Mixed Doubles[edit]

Team Rank1 Seed
India Sania Mirza Croatia Ivan Dodig 8 1
Kazakhstan Yaroslava Shvedova Brazil Bruno Soares 13 2
United States Bethanie Mattek-Sands Romania Horia Tecău 25 3
United States Raquel Atawo Netherlands Jean-Julien Rojer 28 4
Chinese Taipei Chan Hao-ching Belarus Max Mirnyi 29 5
Czech Republic Andrea Hlaváčková Poland Łukasz Kubot 33 6
United States Coco Vandeweghe United States Rajeev Ram 39 7
Czech Republic Lucie Hradecká Poland Marcin Matkowski 44 8
  • 1 Rankings are as of 22 August 2016

Wild Card entries[edit]

The following players were given wildcards to the main draw based on internal selection and recent performances.

Mixed Doubles[edit]

Qualifier entries[edit]

The qualifying competitions took place at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on 23 – 26 August 2016.

Protected ranking[edit]

The following players were accepted directly into the main draw using a protected ranking:

Withdrawals[edit]

The following players were accepted directly into the main tournament but withdrew with injuries, suspensions and other reasons.

Retirements[edit]

Champions[edit]

Seniors[edit]

Men's Singles[edit]

The two players had met 23 times prior, with Djokovic winning on 19 occasions.[27] This was Wawrinka's first appearance in the final of the tournament. Defending champion Djokovic started well, taking Wawrinka's first service game. Djokovic lost an opportunity to serve out the first set, and the set went into a tie-break. There Wawrinka won the third point but lost another seven, and Djokovic took the first set. In the second set, Wawrinka broke first to lead 3–1. Djokovic broke back and held serve to draw at 4–4, but lost his subsequent serve to allow Wawrinka to take the second set 6–4. Djokovic soon trailed 3–0 at the beginning of the third set but levelled it at 5–5. Wawrinka again broke serve in the final game to take the third set 7–5. Wawrinka started the fourth set like the last two, breaking Djokovic's first service game to lead 3–0.[28] Djokovic received two medical timeouts midway through but was unable to prevent Wawrinka from winning the set 6–3 and his first US Open title.[29]

Women's Singles[edit]

Kerber started the match as favorite to win, having assured the No. 1 women's ranking on 12 September. Plíšková reached her first grand slam final, having never previously made it past the third round, by beating home favorite Serena Williams in the semi-finals.[30] Kerber started strongly, breaking Plíšková's first service game and won the first set 6–3 with another break in serve. Plíšková fought back, breaking midway into the second set to take it into a deciding set. In the third set, Plíšková broke Kerber's second service game to lead, before Kerber levelled the set at 3–3. With the match at 5–4, Plíšková served to stay in the match but Kerber won it in a love game to secure her first US Open title.[31]

Men's Doubles[edit]

Women's Doubles[edit]

Mixed Doubles[edit]

Juniors[edit]

Boys' Singles[edit]

Girls' Singles[edit]

Boys' Doubles[edit]

Girls' Doubles[edit]

Invitation[edit]

Men's Champions Doubles[edit]

Women's Champions Doubles[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Prize money listed per team
  2. ^ Winner of the Men's USTA Wild Card Challenge held in Binghamton, New York, Lexington, Kentucky and Aptos, California
  3. ^ Winner of the men's singles tournament in the 2016 NCAA Division I Tennis Championships
  4. ^ Winner of the Kalamazoo Wild Card tournament
  5. ^ Winner of the women's singles tournament in the 2016 NCAA Division I Tennis Championships
  6. ^ Winner of the USTA Girls' under-18 national tournament
  7. ^ Winner of the Women's USTA Wild Card Challenge held in Stockton, California, Sacramento, California and Lexington, Kentucky
  8. ^ Winner of the men's doubles tournament in the 2016 NCAA Division I Tennis Championships
  9. ^ Winner of the women's doubles tournament in the 2016 NCAA Division I Tennis Championships

References[edit]

  1. ^ "New Retractable Roof Ready for Start of US Open". tennis.com. 2 August 2016. Retrieved 5 August 2016. 
  2. ^ Umstead, R. Thomas (14 March 2016). "Tennis Channel Extends French Open Pay TV Rights". Multichannel News. Retrieved 10 July 2016. 
  3. ^ "ESPN drops the French Open, NBCSN could step in". Awful Announcing. Retrieved 9 July 2016. 
  4. ^ "ESPN to Gain Full Rights to U.S. Open in 2015". The New York Times. Retrieved 9 July 2016. 
  5. ^ "2016 US Open to feature richest purse in tennis history". usopen.org. Retrieved 10 July 2016. 
  6. ^ "Prize Money" (PDF). amazonaws.com. Retrieved 5 August 2016. 
  7. ^ "Bonus Challenge – Emirates Airlines US Open Series". emiratesusopenseries.com. 12 July 2016. 
  8. ^ Schlink, Leo (July 27, 2016). "Roger Federer withdraws from Olympics and US Open". Herald Sun. Retrieved January 22, 2017. 
  9. ^ "FORMER CHAMPION JUAN MARTIN DEL POTRO GETS WILD CARD INTO U.S. OPEN". Associated Press. August 16, 2016. Retrieved January 22, 2017. 
  10. ^ "Tomas Berdych withdraws from U.S. Open due to appendicitis". Sports Illustrated. August 20, 2016. Retrieved June 4, 2017. 
  11. ^ "US Open First Round Begins". WTA. August 29, 2016. Retrieved May 6, 2017. 
  12. ^ "Olympic gold medalist Monica Puig out in US Open 1st round". USA Today. August 29, 2016. Retrieved May 6, 2017. 
  13. ^ McGrogan, Ed (August 31, 2016). "NO. 3 SEED GARBINE MUGURUZA FALLS IN SECOND ROUND OF U.S. OPEN TO ANASTASIJA SEVASTOVA". Tennis. Retrieved September 1, 2016. 
  14. ^ Garber, Greg (1 September 2016). "Fan trying to engage Kateryna Bondarenko on court arrested". ESPN. Retrieved 8 January 2017. 
  15. ^ Eccleshare, Charlie (September 5, 2016). "Rafael Nadal exits US Open but don't count him out of winning 15th grand slam". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved January 22, 2017. 
  16. ^ "UN-RETIRED ANASTASIJA SEVASTOVA BEATS JOHANNA KONTA TO REACH U.S. OPEN QUARTERFINALS". Associated Press. September 5, 2016. Retrieved January 23, 2017. 
  17. ^ Clarey, Christopher (September 5, 2016). "Three Frenchmen in U.S. Open Quarterfinals Are All Eager to Topple Novak Djokovic". The New York Times. Retrieved May 6, 2017. 
  18. ^ Ward-Henninger, Colin (September 5, 2016). "U.S. Open results: Serena Williams breaks Federer's record with fourth-round win". CBS Sports. Retrieved February 1, 2017. 
  19. ^ Rothenberg, Ben (September 6, 2016). "Ana Konjuh Stuns Agnieszka Radwanska to Reach Quarterfinals of U.S. Open". The New York Times. Retrieved January 22, 2017. 
  20. ^ "Novak Djokovic reaches Open semis as Jo-Wilfried Tsonga withdraws". Associated Press. September 7, 2016. Retrieved January 25, 2017. 
  21. ^ McCarvel, Nick (September 8, 2016). "Serena Williams stunned by Karolina Pliskova in U.S. Open semifinals". USA Today. Retrieved January 22, 2017. 
  22. ^ Lisanti, Jamie (September 9, 2016). "Kerber beats Wozniacki to reach U.S. Open final after capturing World No. 1 ranking". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved February 1, 2017. 
  23. ^ "Roger Federer to miss Rio Olympics". CNN. 26 July 2016. Retrieved 26 July 2016. 
  24. ^ "Tomas Berdych drops out of U.S. Open because of appendicitis". Tennis. 20 August 2016. Retrieved 20 August 2016. 
  25. ^ "Victoria Azarenka announces pregnancy". Women's Tennis Association. 15 July 2016. Retrieved 15 July 2016. 
  26. ^ "The Latest: Stephens withdraws from US Open with foot injury". foxsports.com. 26 August 2016. Retrieved 26 August 2016. 
  27. ^ Brady, James (September 11, 2016). "Wawrinka beats Djokovic, wins US Open". SB Nation. Retrieved September 12, 2016. 
  28. ^ Graham, Bryan Armen (September 11, 2016). "Stanislas Wawrinka beats Novak Djokovic to win US Open men's title – as it happened". The Guardian. Retrieved September 12, 2016. 
  29. ^ "Wawrinka outlasts Djokovic to win US Open". ESPN. Retrieved September 12, 2016. 
  30. ^ Ubha, Ravi (September 11, 2016). "US Open 2016: Kerber wins title". CNN. Retrieved September 12, 2016. 
  31. ^ Graham, Bryan Armen (September 10, 2016). "Angelique Kerber defeats Karolina Pliskova for US Open title – as it happened". The Guardian. Retrieved September 12, 2016. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
2016 Wimbledon Championships
Grand Slams Succeeded by
2017 Australian Open
Preceded by
2015 US Open
US Open Succeeded by
2017 US Open