2016 World Rally Championship

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2016 World Rally Championship
World Drivers' Champion:
Sébastien Ogier
World Co-drivers' Champion:
Julien Ingrassia
World Manufacturers' Champion:
Volkswagen Motorsport
Previous: 2015 Next: 2017
Support series:
World Rally Championship-2
World Rally Championship-3
Junior World Rally Championship
Sébastien Ogier, the defending drivers' champion.
The Volkswagen Polo R WRC, the car entered by defending manufacturers' champions Volkswagen Motorsport.

The 2016 World Rally Championship was the 44th season of the World Rally Championship, an auto racing championship recognised by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) as the highest class of international rallying. Teams and drivers competed in thirteen rounds—starting with the Rallye Monte Carlo in January and finishing with Rally Australia in November—for the World Rally Championships for Drivers and Manufacturers.

Sébastien Ogier started the season as the defending drivers' champion. His team, Volkswagen Motorsport, were the defending manufacturers' champions. Both Ogier and Volkswagen Motorsport claimed their fourth consecutive drivers' and manufacturers' championships.

Calendar[edit]

The calendar was announced in November 2015 by the FIA.[1] The season was scheduled to expand with one rally in comparison to the 2015 championship, contested over fourteen rounds in Europe, North America, South America, Australia and Asia,[2][3] but the Chinese round was ultimately cancelled.

Round Dates Rally name Rally headquarters Surface Stages Distance
1 21–24 January Monaco Monte Carlo Rally Gap, Hautes-Alpes Mixed 16 337.59km
2 12–14 February Sweden Rally Sweden Karlstad, Värmland Snow 121a 226.48km1b
3 3–6 March Mexico Rally Mexico León, Guanajuato Gravel 21 399.67km
4 21–24 April Argentina Rally Argentina Villa Carlos Paz, Córdoba Gravel 18 364.68km
5 19–22 May Portugal Rally de Portugal Matosinhos, Porto Gravel 19 368.00km
6 9–12 June Italy Rally Italia Sardegna Alghero, Sardinia Gravel 19 324.60km
7 30 June–3 July Poland Rally Poland Mikołajki, Warmia-Masuria Gravel 21 306.10km
8 28–31 July Finland Rally Finland Jyväskylä, Keski-Suomi Gravel 24 333.99km
9 19–21 August Germany Rallye Deutschland Trier, Rhineland-Palatinate Tarmac 18 306.80km
10 9–11 September China Rally China Beijing, Hebei Tarmac Cancelled2
11 30 September–2 October France Tour de Corse Bastia, Haute-Corse Tarmac 10 390.92km
12 13–16 October Spain Rally Catalunya Salou, Tarragona Mixed 21 321.08km
13 28–30 October United Kingdom Wales Rally GB Deeside, Flintshire Gravel 22 336.00km
14 18–20 November Australia Rally Australia Coffs Harbour, New South Wales Gravel 23 283.36km3
Notes
  • ^1  – Rally Sweden was shortened due to warm weather conditions turning frozen roads into soft, muddy gravel and making the studded tyres unsafe to use.[4]
  • ^2  – Rally China was cancelled due to weather damage caused by torrential storms and flooding in July.[5]
  • ^3  – The route of Rally Australia was shortened following concerns over dust reducing visibility in forest stages.

Calendar changes[edit]

Teams and drivers[edit]

The following teams and drivers competed in the World Rally Championship during the 2016 season:

World Rally Car entries eligible to score manufacturer points
Constructor Entrant Tyre No. Drivers Co-drivers Rounds
Volkswagen
(Volkswagen Polo R WRC)
Germany Volkswagen Motorsport[10]         M 1 France Sébastien Ogier[11]     France Julien Ingrassia[12] All
2 Finland Jari-Matti Latvala[13]         Finland Miikka Anttila[12] All
Germany Volkswagen Motorsport II[14] M 9 Norway Andreas Mikkelsen[14]     Norway Anders Jæger[15] All
Hyundai
(Hyundai i20 WRC)
South Korea Hyundai Motorsport[16]         M 3 Belgium Thierry Neuville[17] Belgium Nicolas Gilsoul[12] 1–4, 7–13
New Zealand Hayden Paddon[18] New Zealand John Kennard[18] 5–6
4 Spain Dani Sordo[17] Spain Marc Martí[12] 1, 3–6, 9–12
New Zealand Hayden Paddon[19] New Zealand John Kennard[20] 2, 7–8, 13
South Korea Hyundai Motorsport N M 10 New Zealand Hayden Paddon[21] New Zealand John Kennard[21] 1
Netherlands Kevin Abbring[18] United Kingdom Sebastian Marshall[18] 5–6, 11
20 Spain Dani Sordo[21] Spain Marc Martí[21] 2, 7, 13
New Zealand Hayden Paddon[22] New Zealand John Kennard[22] 3–4, 9–12
Belgium Thierry Neuville[18] Belgium Nicolas Gilsoul[18] 5–6
Netherlands Kevin Abbring[23] United Kingdom Sebastian Marshall[23] 8
Ford
(Ford Fiesta RS WRC)
United Kingdom M-Sport World Rally Team[24]         M 5 Norway Mads Østberg[25] Norway Ola Fløene[26] All
6 France Eric Camilli[25] France Nicolas Klinger[12] 1–2
France Benjamin Veillas[27]       3–13
United Kingdom DMACK World Rally Team[28] D 12 Estonia Ott Tänak[28] Estonia Raigo Mõlder[28] All
Czech Republic Jipocar Czech National Team[29]       P 21 Czech Republic Martin Prokop[29] Czech Republic Jan Tománek[29] 3, 5–6, 11
Saudi Arabia Yazeed Racing[30] P 30 Saudi Arabia Yazeed Al-Rajhi[30] United Kingdom Michael Orr[30] 2, 5–8, 12
World Rally Car entries ineligible to score manufacturer points
Constructor Entrant Tyre No. Drivers Co-drivers Rounds
Citroën
(Citroën DS3 WRC)
France Abu Dhabi Total World Rally Team[31]       M 7 United Kingdom Kris Meeke[31] Republic of Ireland Paul Nagle[32] 1–2, 5, 8, 10–12
France Stéphane Lefebvre[33] France Gabin Moreau[33] 7
8 France Stéphane Lefebvre[31]       France Gabin Moreau[32] 1, 5
Republic of Ireland Craig Breen[33] United Kingdom Scott Martin[33] 7–8, 10–12
10 France Stéphane Lefebvre[34] France Gabin Moreau[34] 9
14 United Arab Emirates Khalid Al Qassimi[31] United Kingdom Chris Patterson[21] 2, 5, 8, 12
France Stéphane Lefebvre[35] France Gilles De Turckheim[35] 13
15 Republic of Ireland Craig Breen[31] United Kingdom Scott Martin[32] 2
Argentina Marcos Ligato[36] Argentina Rubén García[36] 4, 8
16 France Quentin Gilbert[35] Belgium Renaud Jamoul[35] 13
83 Argentina José Alberto Nicolas[36] Argentina Miguel Recalt[36] 4
Argentina Leonardo Suaya[23] 8
Italy D-Max Racing[20] P 18 Italy Felice Re[20] Italy Mara Bariani[20] 1
Ford
(Ford Fiesta RS WRC)
Norway Adapta Motorsport[21] M 15 Norway Henning Solberg[37] Austria Ilka Minor[37] 2, 4–7, 12
Italy BRC Racing Team[20][38] P 16 Poland Robert Kubica[39] Poland Maciek Szczepaniak[20]       1
Italy Motorsport Italia P 16 Mexico Benito Guerra[22] Spain Borja Rozada[22] 3
United Kingdom M-Sport World Rally Team M 17 France Bryan Bouffier[20] France Victor Bellotto[20] 1
Czech Republic Jipocar Czech National Team[18] P 22 Slovakia Jaroslav Melichárek[18] Slovakia Erik Melichárek[18] 5
Italy FWRT s.r.l. P 37 Italy Lorenzo Bertelli[40] Italy Simone Scattolin[40] 1–4, 6–8, 10–13
Italy A-Style Team[41] P 81 Switzerland Federico Della Casa[41] Italy Domenico Pozzi[41] 6
Ukraine AT Rally Team[23] P 81 Ukraine Oleksiy Tamrazov[23] Italy Nicola Arena[23] 8
United Arab Emirates Abdullah Al Qassimi Rally Team[23] M 81 United Arab Emirates Abdullah Al Qassimi[23] United Kingdom Steve Lancaster[23] 8, 12
Italy Delta Rally[41] P 83 Italy Roberto Tononi[41] Italy Paolo Comini[41] 6
Turkey Toksport World Rally Team[23] D 84 Finland Matti Koskelo[23] Finland Rami Suorsa[23] 8
Mini
(Mini John Cooper
Works WRC)
Ukraine Eurolamp World Rally Team[21] P 18 Ukraine Valeriy Gorban[21] Ukraine Volodymyr Korsia[21] 2–8, 11–12
82 Estonia Mait Maarend[21] Estonia Mihkel Kapp[21] 2, 6

Constructor changes[edit]

Citroën formally withdrew manufacturer support for the DS3 WRC at the end of the 2015 season.
  • Citroën withdrew their works team from the 2016 season in order to focus on development of their 2017 car ahead of major regulation changes for the 2017 season.[42] However, the manufacturer remained open to contesting selected events and the Citroën DS3 WRC was still made available to privateer teams.[43] Citroën previously withdrew formal works support for a team in 2006 when the Xsara WRC reached the end of its working life, in order to focus on developing the Xsara's replacement, the C4 WRC.
  • After contesting selected World Rally Championship and WRC-2 events between 2013 and 2015, Anglo-Chinese tyre manufacturer DMACK planned to contest the full 2016 season as a manufacturer team.[28] The team is equipped with Ford Fiesta RS WRCs built and prepared by M-Sport.

Driver changes[edit]

Rally summaries[edit]

Round 1 — Monte Carlo Rally[edit]

Defending World Champion Sébastien Ogier started the season with a win in Monte Carlo, his third consecutive in the principality. Ogier and Kris Meeke fought for the rally lead until Meeke hit a rock on SS12. He managed to return to the stage finish but was forced to withdraw due to damage sustained to his gearbox. Jari-Matti Latvala retired from third after losing control of his car and running off the road, hitting a spectator, though no-one was seriously injured. Andreas Mikkelsen finished second after resisting Thierry Neuville. Only seven WRC cars reached the end of the rally after six retirements.[47]

Round 2 — Rally Sweden[edit]

The Rally Sweden was marked by the lack of snow, which forced the organization to change the rally route and cancel some of the stages that had started to thaw out, making the studded snow tyres unsafe to use. Ogier protested the event going ahead, but with the changes to the route approved by the FIA, he took to the start and went on to claim the win.

Jari-Matti Latvala was delayed by mechanical issues, suffering a broken drive shaft early in the second stage. Andreas Mikkelsen in the third Polo R WRC was Ogier's early challenger, but as the temperature started to drop and the roads started to freeze over, Hayden Paddon emerged as his biggest rival. By the third day, the roads had completely set, allowing Ogier to maintain his lead. Mads Østberg completed the podium, having taken advantage of his rivals' ongoing battles to build and sustain a margin big enough to maintain third overall.

Round 3 — Rally Mexico[edit]

Having scored no points in the opening rounds while Ogier took a full 58, Jari-Matti Latvala started the Rally Mexico needing to secure a strong result if he was to have any hope of mounting a bid for the World Drivers' Championship. With the running order set based on championship positions, Ogier was forced to sweep the roads clear of loose gravel, while Latvala enjoyed comparatively clean roads. He took advantage of this from the first stage, establishing an early lead that he consistently built upon throughout the first two days of the event. With the running order for the final day—which included the single longest special stage on the calendar, weighing in at eighty kilometres—based on the rally standings, Latvala's advantage was quashed, but his lead strong enough to secure his first win of the season ahead of Ogier. Hyundai's Dani Sordo finished third overall, but a late penalty handed the final podium place to Mads Østberg.

Round 4 — Rally Argentina[edit]

Wishing to continue his point scoring momentum, Jari-Matti Latvala targeted Argentina as another rally to win to further his championship standings. Another driver determined to score a podium in this rally was Hayden Paddon. The two drivers were in close competition on Friday, but by Saturday morning Latvala pulled ahead. In the afternoon, however, Latvala suffered a major accident, forcing him to retire, and giving the lead to Paddon. Engine problems on Sunday combined with a quick time from Sebastian Ogier on the penultimate stage meant the winner would be decided on the power stage. Hayden Paddon won the power stage and took his first WRC event win. Sebastian Ogier placed second, While Andreas Mikkelsen placed third. Paddon was elevated to second place in the overall championship, but Volkswagen Motorsport held the lead in the manufacturers championship.

Round 5 — Rally de Portugal[edit]

Participating in his third even of the season as Citroen was not included in the manufacturers championship, Kris Meeke was determined to gain experience for the upcoming 2017 season. He managed to keep a strong lead throughout Friday, but second place was in high contention. Dani Sordo and Sebastian Ogier fought for the position in the afternoon. Hayden Paddon and Ott Tänak would run off of the road in the same place. Paddon's car became engulfed in flames which destroyed it, but Tänak managed to pull his vehicle away from the inferno. Saturday proved only to increase the gap between Meeke and Ogier, and on Sunday Andreas Mikkelsen would take second place off of Ogier. Kris Meeke took the event win, but Ogier would take the three power stage points.

Round 6 — Rally Italia Sardegna[edit]

Jari-Matti Latvala wished to gain another win in Italy's WRC Event to reignite his season after scoring points in only two of five events so far. He led Friday morning, but by the last stage was passed by Thierry Neuville. Hayden Paddon ran off of the road on stage seven, destroying his car for the second event in a row. Andreas Mikkelsen and later Mads Ostberg would both be involved in incidents on Saturday afternoon, forcing Mikkelsen out of the point-scoring positions and Ostberg to retire. Thierry Neuville would win his second WRC event, followed by Latvala in second and then Ogier, who managed to score all three power stage points.

Round 7 — Rally Poland[edit]

After career-best position in Poland in 2015, Ott Tänak was determined to make the most out of this year's running of the event. Friday saw the lead changing between Tänak, Andreas Mikkelsen, and Hayden Paddon, the later two of which wanted redemption for the lack of points in Sardinia. On Saturday, Tänak would expand his lead over Andreas, who was close behind. Sunday seemed as if Tänak would take the victory, but on the penultimate stage Tänak would receive a punctured tire, putting him in second place. Andreas Mikkelsen ended up winning the event ahead of a crushed Tänak, with Hayden Paddon finishing in third.

Round 8 — Rally Finland[edit]

Being his home event, and after winning the event the previous two years, Jari-Matti Latvala was an obvious contender in Finland. Kris Meeke would return to participate for the first time after his victory in Portugal. Meeke took the lead on Friday and held it firm, while Latvala chased behind. Ott Tänak, despite holding an early second place, would spin and puncture a tire before the day was out. Sebastian Ogier would get stuck in a ditch, putting him out of the points. On Saturday, Meeke would distance his lead over Latvala a long way. Stages thirteen and fourteen would be canceled by violent crashes by Lorenzo Bertelli and Eric Camilli respectively. Craig Breen would find his way into third after Tänak's crash. On Sunday, Meeke became the first Brit to win the event. Latvala would follow up, and Craig Breen would score third, a personal best. Kris Meeke ended up breaking the record for the highest average speed in a rally.

Round 9 — Rallye Deutschland[edit]

The first event on tarmac since Monte Carlo, Sebastian Ogier would not have to clean the roads as he did by going first in gravel stages. Though determined to place first, an early mistake pushed him behind Andreas Mikkelsen. Thierry Neuville, considering Germany his home event as it is the closest event to his home country Belgium, kept behind Ogier in third. Jari-Matti Latvala retired on the first stage due to gearbox issues. Ogier would regain the lead on Saturday, and Dani Sordo would take third from Neuville. By the end of the event, Mikkelsen would fall a further two positions, giving the win to Ogier. Dani Sordo would place second, finishing ahead of Neuville by less than a tenth of a second.

Round 10 — Tour de Corse[edit]

Due to the cancellation of Rally China, the Tour de Corse was the round after Rallye Deutschland. Being another tarmac event, Sebastian Ogier saw this as another opportunity to take a win. Ogier started off strongly, winning all four events on Friday. Kris Meeke pushed his way into second, but a spin and a puncture set him back. Dani Sordo also fell from second due to a puncture. This gave the position to Thierry Neuville and third to Jari-Matti Latvala. On Saturday, Andreas Mikkelsen overtook Latvala and attempted to chase Neuville. Meeke would crash on Saturday, pulling him out of the points places. The event would finish in the order it was in that evening, with Ogier finishing first, Neuville finishing second, and Mikkelsen in third. Despite finishing in sixteenth, Meeke would take first in the power stage.

Results and standings[edit]

Season summary[edit]

Round Event name Winning driver Winning co-driver Winning manufacturer Winning time Report
1 Monaco Monte Carlo Rally  France Sébastien Ogier France Julien Ingrassia Germany Volkswagen Motorsport  3:49:53.1 Report
2 Sweden Rally Sweden France Sébastien Ogier France Julien Ingrassia  Germany Volkswagen Motorsport 1:59:47.4 Report
3 Mexico Rally Mexico Finland Jari-Matti Latvala  Finland Miikka Anttila Germany Volkswagen Motorsport 4:25:57.4 Report
4 Argentina Rally Argentina New Zealand Hayden Paddon  New Zealand John Kennard South Korea Hyundai Motorsport N 3:40:52.9 Report
5 Portugal Rally de Portugal United Kingdom Kris Meeke  Republic of Ireland Paul Nagle France Abu Dhabi Total WRT 3:59:01.0 Report
6 Italy Rally Italia Sardegna Belgium Thierry Neuville  Belgium Nicolas Gilsoul South Korea Hyundai Motorsport N 3:35:25.8 Report
7 Poland Rally Poland Norway Andreas Mikkelsen Norway Anders Jæger Germany Volkswagen Motorsport II 2:37:34.4 Report
8 Finland Rally Finland United Kingdom Kris Meeke Republic of Ireland Paul Nagle France Abu Dhabi Total WRT 2:38:05.8 Report
9 Germany Rallye Deutschland France Sébastien Ogier France Julien Ingrassia  Germany Volkswagen Motorsport 3:00:26.7 Report
10 China Rally China Rally cancelled (due to the 2016 China floods)
11 France Tour de Corse France Sébastien Ogier France Julien Ingrassia  Germany Volkswagen Motorsport 4:07:17.0 Report
12 Spain Rally Catalunya France Sébastien Ogier France Julien Ingrassia  Germany Volkswagen Motorsport 3:13:03.6 Report
13 United Kingdom Wales Rally GB France Sébastien Ogier France Julien Ingrassia  Germany Volkswagen Motorsport 3:14:30.2 Report
14 Australia Rally Australia Norway Andreas Mikkelsen Norway Anders Jæger Germany Volkswagen Motorsport II 2:46:05.7 Report

FIA World Rally Championship for Drivers[edit]

Points are awarded to the top ten classified finishers. There are also three bonus points awarded to the winner of the Power stage, two points for second place and one for third.

Position  1st   2nd   3rd   4th   5th   6th   7th   8th   9th   10th 
Points 25 18 15 12 10 8 6 4 2 1
Pos. Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
MEX
Mexico
ARG
Argentina
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
POL
Poland
FIN
Finland
GER
Germany
CHN
China
FRA
France
ESP
Spain
GBR
United Kingdom
AUS
Australia
Points
1 France Sébastien Ogier 11 11 21 23 31 31 61 24 13 C 13 12 1 21 268
2 Belgium Thierry Neuville 3 14 Ret 6 29 1 43 41 31 C 2 3 33 32 160
3 Norway Andreas Mikkelsen 23 42 Ret 3 23 13 1 7 4 C 32 Ret 122 1 154
4 New Zealand Hayden Paddon 25 2 53 11 Ret Ret 3 52 5 C 6 4 4 4 138
5 Spain Dani Sordo 62 6 4 42 4 4 Ret WD 2 C 7 23 6 53 130
6 Finland Jari-Matti Latvala Ret 26 12 16 62 23 52 23 482 C 4 141 7 9 112
7 Norway Mads Østberg 4 3 3 5 7 Ret 8 6 6 C 9 5 8 6 102
8 Estonia Ott Tänak 7 5 6 15 Ret 5 2 Ret 23 C 10 6 21 7 88
9 United Kingdom Kris Meeke Ret 233 1 1 C 161 Ret 5 64
10 Republic of Ireland Craig Breen 8 7 3 C 5 10 Ret 36
11 France Eric Camilli Ret Ret 16 8 5 6 10 Ret 50 C 8 19 10 Ret 28
12 Finland Esapekka Lappi 9 12 21 14 8 7 C 11 8 16
13 France Stéphane Lefebvre 5 35 9 Ret C 9 14
14 Norway Henning Solberg 7 9 27 7 15 12 C WD 14
15 Czech Republic Martin Prokop 7 8 9 C Ret 12
16 Netherlands Kevin Abbring Ret 152 9 C Ret 7 Ret 10
17 Sweden Pontus Tidemand 11 9 19 Ret 8 C 9 13 8
18 Finland Teemu Suninen 12 10 9 45 8 11 10 56 C 15 28 14 8
19 Czech Republic Jan Kopecký 19 10 9 C 12 8 16 WD 7
20 Argentina Marcos Ligato 7 44 C 6
21 United Kingdom Elfyn Evans 8 9 17 30 13 11 C 11 WD 6
22 Italy Lorenzo Bertelli Ret Ret 8 13 WD Ret 12 Ret WD C 17 11 15 10 5
23 Germany Armin Kremer 10 19 12 Ret 10 C Ret 2
24 Peru Nicolás Fuchs 14 10 10 Ret 20 C 21 11 2
25 Ukraine Valeriy Gorban 24 10 Ret Ret 28 27 21 C 15 37 1
Pos. Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
MEX
Mexico
ARG
Argentina
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
POL
Poland
FIN
Finland
GER
Germany
CHN
China
FRA
France
ESP
Spain
GBR
United Kingdom
AUS
Australia
Points
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Black Excluded (EX)
Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Cancelled (C)
Blank Withdrew entry from
the event (WD)

Notes:
1 2 3 – Indicate position on Power stage

FIA World Rally Championship for Co-Drivers[edit]

Points are awarded to the top ten classified finishers. There are also three bonus points awarded to the winner of the Power stage, two points for second place and one for third.

Position  1st   2nd   3rd   4th   5th   6th   7th   8th   9th   10th 
Points 25 18 15 12 10 8 6 4 2 1
Pos. Co-driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
MEX
Mexico
ARG
Argentina
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
POL
Poland
FIN
Finland
GER
Germany
CHN
China
FRA
France
ESP
Spain
GBR
United Kingdom
AUS
Australia
Points
1 France Julien Ingrassia 11 11 21 23 31 31 61 24 13 C 13 12 1 21 268
2 Belgium Nicolas Gilsoul 3 14 Ret 6 29 1 43 41 31 C 2 3 33 32 160
3 Norway Anders Jæger 23 42 Ret 3 23 13 1 7 4 C 32 Ret 122 1 154
4 New Zealand John Kennard 25 2 53 11 Ret Ret 3 52 5 C 6 4 4 4 138
5 Spain Marc Martí 62 6 4 42 4 4 Ret WD 2 C 7 23 6 53 130
6 Finland Miikka Anttila Ret 26 12 16 62 23 52 23 482 C 4 141 7 9 112
7 Norway Ola Fløene 4 3 3 5 7 Ret 8 6 6 C 9 5 8 6 102
8 Estonia Raigo Mõlder 7 5 6 15 Ret 5 2 Ret 23 C 10 6 21 7 88
9 Republic of Ireland Paul Nagle Ret 233 1 1 C 161 Ret 5 64
10 United Kingdom Scott Martin 8 7 3 C 5 10 Ret 36
11 France Benjamin Veillas 16 8 5 6 10 Ret 50 C 8 19 10 Ret 28
12 Finland Janne Ferm 9 12 21 14 8 7 C 11 8 16
13 Austria Ilka Minor 7 9 27 7 15 12 C WD 14
14 France Gabin Moreau 5 35 9 Ret C 12
15 Czech Republic Jan Tomanek 7 8 9 C Ret 12
16 United Kingdom Sebastian Marshall Ret 152 9 C Ret 7 Ret 10
17 Sweden Jonas Andersson 19 11 9 19 Ret 8 C 9 13 8
18 Finland Mikko Markkula 12 10 9 45 8 11 10 56 C 15 28 14 8
19 Czech Republic Pavel Dresler 19 10 9 C 12 8 16 WD 7
20 Argentina Rubén Garcia 7 44 C 6
21 United Kingdom Craig Parry 8 9 17 30 13 11 C 11 WD 6
22 Italy Simone Scattolin Ret Ret 8 13 WD Ret 12 Ret WD C 17 11 15 10 5
23 France Gilles De Turckheim C 9 2
24 Germany Pirmin Winklhofer 10 19 12 Ret 10 C Ret 2
25 Argentina Fernando Mussano 14 10 10 Ret 20 C 21 11 2
26 Ukraine Volodymyr Korsia 24 10 Ret Ret 28 27 21 C 15 37 1
Pos. Co-driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
MEX
Mexico
ARG
Argentina
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
POL
Poland
FIN
Finland
GER
Germany
CHN
China
FRA
France
ESP
Spain
GBR
United Kingdom
AUS
Australia
Points
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Black Excluded (EX)
Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Cancelled (C)
Blank Withdrew entry from
the event (WD)

Notes:
1 2 3 – Indicate position on Power stage

FIA World Rally Championship for Manufacturers[edit]

Points are awarded to the top ten classified finishers.[48]

Position  1st   2nd   3rd   4th   5th   6th   7th   8th   9th   10th 
Points 25 18 15 12 10 8 6 4 2 1
Pos. Manufacturer No. MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
MEX
Mexico
ARG
Argentina
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
POL
Poland
FIN
Finland
GER
Germany
CHN
China
FRA
France
ESP
Spain
GBR
United Kingdom
AUS
Australia
Points
1 Germany Volkswagen Motorsport 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 6 7 1 C 1 1 1 2 377
2 Ret 8 1 9 5 2 5 1 8 C 4 8 6 8
2 South Korea Hyundai Motorsport 3 3 7 Ret 6 Ret Ret 4 2 3 C 2 3 3 3 312
4 5 2 4 4 3 4 3 3 2 C 6 2 5 4
3 Germany Volkswagen Motorsport II 9 2 4 Ret 3 1 8 1 5 4 C 3 Ret 9 1 163
4 United Kingdom M-Sport World Rally Team 5 4 3 3 5 6 Ret 7 4 6 C 8 5 7 6 162
6 Ret Ret 8 7 4 6 8 Ret 9 C 7 9 8 Ret
5 South Korea Hyundai Motorsport N 10 7 Ret 9 C 7 146
20 6 5 1 9 1 Ret 6 5 C 5 4 4 5
6 United Kingdom DMACK World Rally Team 12 6 5 6 8 Ret 5 2 Ret 7 C 9 6 2 7 98
7 Czech Republic Jipocar Czech National Team 21 7 7 7 C Ret 18
8 Saudi Arabia Yazeed Racing 30 Ret 8 Ret Ret Ret C Ret 4
Pos. Manufacturer No. MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
MEX
Mexico
ARG
Argentina
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
POL
Poland
FIN
Finland
GER
Germany
CHN
China
FRA
France
ESP
Spain
GBR
United Kingdom
AUS
Australia
Points
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Black Excluded (EX)
Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Cancelled (C)
Blank Withdrew entry from
the event (WD)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2016 FIA World Rally Championship Calendar". fia.com. Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. 3 November 2015. Retrieved 20 December 2015. 
  2. ^ "WRC 2016 dates confirmed". WRC.com. Retrieved 3 November 2015. 
  3. ^ a b "WRC 2016 dates & surfaces". eWRC-results.com. Retrieved 3 November 2015. 
  4. ^ "Weather forces Sweden route revamp". WRC.com. WRC.com. Retrieved 11 February 2016. 
  5. ^ "Rally China cancelled due to weather damage - wrc.com". www.wrc.com. Retrieved 16 August 2016. 
  6. ^ Lomas, Gordan (14 May 2015). "Rally Australia on preliminary 2016 WRC draft schedule". speedcafe. Retrieved 20 July 2015. 
  7. ^ "China on provisional WRC calendar". autosport.com. Haymarket Publications. Retrieved 5 November 2015. 
  8. ^ "Rally GB secures WRC future". Autosport.com. Haymarket Publications. 5 August 2015. Retrieved 5 August 2015. 
  9. ^ "New look for Corsica encounter". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. Retrieved 5 May 2016. 
  10. ^ "Volkswagen's WRC programme secure". WRC.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 1 October 2015. Retrieved 19 October 2015. 
  11. ^ "Ogier Contract: 'A Simple Decision'". WRC.com. World Rally Championship. Retrieved 26 November 2015. 
  12. ^ a b c d e "Rally Monte Carlo entry list". eWRC-results.com. Retrieved 3 December 2015. 
  13. ^ "VW promises Latvala seat is safe". Autosport.com. Haymarket Publications. Retrieved 5 August 2015. 
  14. ^ a b "Mikkelsen pens new Volkswagen deal". Autosport.com. Haymarket Publications. Retrieved 5 August 2015. 
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External links[edit]