2016 in archosaur paleontology

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List of years in archosaur paleontology
In paleontology
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
In science
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019

Basal archosauriforms[edit]

Research[edit]

  • A study on the resting metabolic rate of 14 taxa of fossil archosauromorph reptiles as indicated by bone histology is published by Legendre et al. (2016).[1]
  • A study of the phylogenetic relationships of the archosauriforms traditionally assigned to the family Euparkeriidae is published by Sookias (2016).[2]
  • A redescription of the braincase and the inner ear of Euparkeria capensis is published by Sobral et al. (2016).[3]
  • A study of the phylogenetic relationships of archosauromorph reptiles, with an emphasis on the phylogenetic relationships of proterosuchids and erythrosuchids, is published by Ezcurra (2016).[4]
  • A study on the patterns of morphological diversity of the skulls of late Permian to Early Jurassic archosauromorph reptiles is published by Foth et al. (2016).[5]
  • A study on the braincase anatomy of the type specimens of Pseudochampsa ischigualastensis and Tropidosuchus romeri is published by Trotteyn & Paulina-Carabajal (2016).[6]
  • A reevaluation of the neotype specimen of Parasuchus hislopi and a study of the phylogenetic relationships of the species is published by Kammerer et al. (2016), who consider the genus Parasuchus to be a senior synonym of the genera Paleorhinus and Arganarhinus, and refer the species Paleorhinus bransoni Williston (1904), Francosuchus angustifrons Kuhn (1936) and Paleorhinus magnoculus Dutuit (1977) to the genus Parasuchus.[7]
  • A study on the endocranial anatomy (including the brain, inner ear, neurovascular structures and sinus systems) of Parasuchus angustifrons and Ebrachosuchus neukami is published by Lautenschlager & Butler (2016).[8]

New taxa[edit]

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Litorosuchus[9]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Li et al.

Middle Triassic

Falang Formation

 China

Probably a relative of Vancleavea. The type species is L. somnii.

Triopticus[10]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Stocker et al.

Late Triassic (latest Carnian-early Norian)

Dockum Group

 United States
( Texas)

Probably a basal member of Archosauriformes. The type species is T. primus.

Pseudosuchians[edit]

Research[edit]

New taxa[edit]

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Agaresuchus[35]

Gen. et sp. et comb. nov

Valid

Narváez et al.

Late Cretaceous (late CampanianMaastrichtian)

 Spain

A member of Allodaposuchidae. Genus includes new species Agaresuchus fontisensis, as well as Allodaposuchus” subjuniperus.

Bayomesasuchus[36]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Barrios, Paulina-Carabajal & Bona

Late Cretaceous

Cerro Lisandro Formation

 Argentina

A peirosaurid crocodyliform. The type species is Bayomesasuchus hernandezi.

Elosuchus broinae[37]

Sp. nov

Valid

Meunier & Larsson

Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian)

 Algeria

Fortignathus[38]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid[39]

Young et al.

Cretaceous (late Albian-early Cenomanian)

Echkar Formation

 Niger

A dyrosaurid or a relative of dyrosaurids; a new genus for "Elosuchus" felixi de Lapparent de Broin (2002).

Gryposuchus pachakamue[40]

Sp. nov

Valid

Salas-Gismondi et al.

Miocene

Pebas Formation

 Peru

A member of Gryposuchinae, a species of Gryposuchus.

Kalthifrons[41]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Yates & Pledge

Pliocene

Tirari Formation

 Australia

A member of Mekosuchinae. The type species is K. aurivellensis.

Kentisuchus astrei[42]

Sp. nov

Valid

Jouve

Eocene (late Lutetian)

 France

A member of Tomistominae, a species of Kentisuchus.

Lavocatchampsa[43]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Martin & De Lapparent De Broin

Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian)

Kem Kem Beds

 Morocco

A notosuchian. The type species is L. sigogneaurusselae.

Llanosuchus[44]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Fiorelli et al.

Late Cretaceous (Campanian?)

Los Llanos Formation

 Argentina

A notosuchian crocodyliform. The type species is Llanosuchus tamaensis.

Machimosaurus rex[45]

Sp. nov

Valid

Fanti et al.

Early Cretaceous

 Tunisia

A teleosaurid crocodylomorph, a species of Machimosaurus.

Patagosuchus[46]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Lio et al.

Late Cretaceous (Turonian–Coniacian)

Portezuelo Formation

 Argentina

A peirosaurid crocodylomorph. The type species is Patagosuchus anielensis.

Protoalligator[47]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid

Wang, Sullivan & Liu

Middle Paleocene

Wanghudun Formation

 China

A member of Alligatoroidea of uncertain phylogenetic placement; a new genus for "Eoalligator" huiningensis Young (1982).

Sabinosuchus[48]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Shiller, Porras-Muzquiz & Lehman

Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian)

Escondido Formation

 Mexico

A member of Dyrosauridae. The type species is S. coahuilensis.

Sabresuchus[49]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid

Tennant, Mannion & Upchurch

Cretaceous (late BarremianMaastrichtian)

 Romania
 Spain

A member of Paralligatoridae. The type species is "Theriosuchus" ibericus Brinkmann (1989); genus also includes "Theriosuchus" sympiestodon Martin, Rabi & Csiki (2010).

Scutarx[50][51]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Parker

Late Triassic (middle Norian)

Chinle Formation
Cooper Canyon Formation

 United States
( Arizona,  Texas)

An aetosaur. The type species is Scutarx deltatylus.

Ultrastenos[52]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Stein, Hand & Archer

Late Oligocene

Riversleigh World Heritage Area

 Australia

A member of Mekosuchinae. The type species is U. willisi.

Vivaron[53]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Lessner et al.

Late Triassic (Norian)

Chinle Formation

 United States
( New Mexico)

A rauisuchid. The type species is V. haydeni.

Basal dinosauromorphs[edit]

Research[edit]

New taxa[edit]

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Dromomeron gigas[57]

Sp. nov

Valid

Martínez et al.

Late Triassic (Norian)

Quebrada del Barro Formation

 Argentina

A lagerpetid dinosauromorph, a species of Dromomeron.

Ixalerpeton[58]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Cabreira et al.

Late Triassic (Carnian)

Santa Maria Formation

 Brazil

A lagerpetid dinosauromorph. The type species is I. polesinensis.

Non-avian dinosaurs[edit]

Research[edit]

  • An assessment of methods used to the determine the ontogenetic status of non-avian dinosaur specimens is published by Hone, Farke & Wedel (2016).[59]
  • A study of the evolutionary dynamics of speciation and extinction through time in Mesozoic dinosaurs is published by Sakamoto, Benton & Venditti (2016).[60]
  • A study on the dinosaur metabolism, re-evaluating earlier studies of Werner & Griebeler (2014)[61] and Grady et al. (2014),[62] is published by Myhrvold (2016).[63][64][65]
  • A study on the morphological similarities of the skulls of Plateosaurus engelhardti, Stegosaurus stenops and Erlikosaurus andrewsi, their feeding mechanics and behaviour is published by Lautenschlager et al. (2016).[66]
  • A study testing for a correlation between the presence of bony cranial ornaments and large body size in non-avian theropod dinosaurs is published by Gates, Organ & Zanno (2016).[67]
  • A description of theropod teeth from the Late Jurassic of Northern Germany and a study of their phylogenetic relationships is published by Gerke & Wings (2016).[68]
  • A study on the tooth attachment tissues in Coelophysis bauri is published by Fong et al. (2016).[69]
  • A study on the variation in morphological changes during ontogeny among members of the same species in early dinosaurs Coelophysis bauri and Megapnosaurus rhodesiensis as compared to the variation among living birds and crocodilians is published by Griffin & Nesbitt (2016).[70]
  • Senter & Juengst (2016) identify pathological features in eight pectoral girdle and forelimb bones of the holotype specimen of Dilophosaurus wetherilli.[71]
  • A study of osteology and phylogenetic relationships of Elaphrosaurus bambergi is published by Rauhut & Carrano (2016).[72]
  • A new specimen of Velocisaurus unicus is described by Brissón Egli, Agnolín & Novas (2016).[73]
  • Footprints attributed to large megalosaurid theropods are described from the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian) Serra de Aire Formation (Portugal) by Razzolini et al. (2016), who interpret the tracks as left by dinosaurs crossing the tidal flat during low tide periods.[74]
  • A study on the validity of the theropod genus Altispinax is published by Maisch (2016).[75]
  • Six isolated spinosaurid quadrates, most likely coming from the Kem Kem Beds, are described by Hendrickx, Mateus & Buffetaut (2016), who interpret the differences in their anatomy as confirming the presence of two spinosaurine taxa in the Cenomanian of North Africa, rather than only one (Spinosaurus aegyptiacus).[76]
  • The description of a new large abelisaurid femur (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Kem Kem Beds, by Alfio Alessandro Chiarenza & Andrea Cau (2016) demonstrates the presence of large bodied individuals of this clade sympatric with other giant theropod dinosaurs from this area. This study includes also an overview on the Cenomanian (Late Cretaceous) theropod assemblage from Morocco.[77]
  • Fossils of a large Early Cretaceous (Albian) megaraptorid theropod are described from the Griman Creek Formation (New South Wales, Australia) by Bell et al. (2016), who consider the theropod to be the largest predatory dinosaur yet identified from Australia.[78]
  • A study on the manual anatomy of Megaraptor and Australovenator, as well as its implications for the phylogenetic relationships of these taxa, is published by Novas, Aranciaga Rolando & Agnolín (2016).[79]
  • A study of the phylogenetic relationships of tyrannosauroid theropods is published by Brusatte and Carr (2016).[80]
  • Medullary bone homologous with one present in living birds is identified in a specimen of Tyrannosaurus rex by Schweitzer et al. (2016).[81]
  • Three fossil feathers from the Crato Member of the Early Cretaceous Santana Formation (Brazil) are described by Prado et al. (2016), who attribute them to coelurosaurian theropods of uncertain phylogenetic placement.[82]
  • Feathered tail of a theropod dinosaur, probably of a juvenile non-avian coelurosaur, preserved in Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Burmese amber is described by Xing et al. (2016)[83]
  • A study of the effectiveness of proposed pathways for the evolution of the flight stroke in non-avian coelurosaurian theropods and early birds using biomechanical mathematical models is published by Dececchi, Larsson & Habib (2016).[84]
  • A detailed description of the morphology of the mandible and teeth of Segnosaurus galbinensis is published by Zanno et al. (2016).[85]
  • The first known oviraptorosaur (Avimimus) bone bed is described from the Nemegt Formation (Mongolia) by Funston et al. (2016).[86]
  • New specimens of Elmisaurus rarus are described from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia by Currie, Funston & Osmólska (2016).[87]
  • New specimens of Leptorhynchos elegans and Leptorhynchos sp. are described from the Late Cretaceous of Canada by Funston, Currie & Burns (2016).[88]
  • A study on the micro- and ultrastructure of the fossil claw sheath of a specimen of Citipati osmolskae, indicating the preservation of original keratinous claw material, is published by Moyer, Zheng & Schweitzer (2016).[89]
  • A study of the morphological disparity of teeth of maniraptoran theropods living during the last 18 million years of the Cretaceous is published by Larson, Brown and Evans (2016).[90]
  • A robust ilium of a basal sauropodomorph dinosaur is described from the Elliot Formation (South Africa) by McPhee & Choiniere (2016).[91]
  • A new complete femur assigned to Pampadromaeus barberenai is described by Müller et al. (2016).[92]
  • A study on the jaw adductor musculature and bite forces in Plateosaurus and Camarasaurus is published by Button, Barrett & Rayfield (2016).[93]
  • A study of the evolution of whole-body shape and body segment properties of sauropod dinosaurs is published by Bates et al. (2016).[94]
  • A study on the intervertebral joints in the necks and tails of sauropod dinosaurs, characterized by having the convex articular face directed away from the body and the concave articular face directed toward the body, is published by Fronimos, Wilson & Baumiller (2016), who argue that these joints evolved to prevent possible joint failure caused by rotation, providing stability with greater mobility and facilitating the evolution of elongated necks and tails in sauropods.[95]
  • A restudy of Sanpasaurus yaoi, originally classified as an ornithopod dinosaur, is published by McPhee et al. (2016), who consider this species to be an early sauropod instead.[96]
  • Description of several sauropod vertebrae collected from the Early Cretaceous Kirkwood Formation (South Africa) and a study on the diversity of the sauropods known from the Kirkwood Formation is published by McPhee et al. (2016).[97]
  • Gallina (2016) argues that Amargatitanis macni, initially considered to be a titanosaur, is actually a dicraeosaurid.[98]
  • A reassessment of the systematics, paleoenvironment, life history and geologic age of Sonorasaurus thompsoni is published by D’Emic, Foreman & Jud (2016).[99]
  • A study on divergence dates and ancestral ranges of Titanosauria is published by Gorscak & O‘Connor (2016).[100]
  • Osteoma and hemangioma are documented for the first time in a vertebra of a titanosaur sauropod from the Late Cretaceous of Brazil by de Souza Barbosa et al. (2016).[101]
  • Sauropod fossils, including a caudal vertebra attributed to a large-bodied lithostrotian titanosaur, are reported from the Cretaceous Kem Kem Beds (Morocco) by Ibrahim et al. (2016).[102]
  • A study on the anatomy of the appendicular skeleton of Dreadnoughtus schrani is published by Ullmann & Lacovara (2016).[103]
  • A study of the skull anatomy and phylogenetic relationships of Tapuiasaurus macedoi is published by Wilson et al. (2016).[104]
  • A juvenile specimen of Rapetosaurus krausei is described by Curry Rogers et al. (2016).[105]
  • Well-vascularised endosteally formed bone tissue is reported in the saltasaurine titanosaurs by Chinsamy, Cerda & Powell (2016), who argue that additional evidence is required to determine whether vascularised endosteal bone tissues reported in extinct archosaurs are medullary bone or just a pathological bone.[106]
  • A study on the effect of jaw shape and jaw adductor musculature on the relative bite force in members of 52 ornithischian genera is published by Nabavizadeh (2016).[107]
  • A study on the anatomical diversity of the predentary in ornithischian dinosaurs is published by Nabavizadeh & Weishampel (2016).[108]
  • Heterodontosaurid metatarsi, phalanges and tail vertebrae are described from the Early Jurassic (late Toarcian) Cañadon Asfalto Formation (Argentina) by Becerra et al. (2016), who note the similarities in anatomy of the digits of this heterodontosaurid and the digits of arboreal birds and argue that the heterodontosaurid might have had grasping feet with long digits.[109]
  • New specimens of Lesothosaurus diagnosticus are described by Barrett et al. (2016).[110]
  • A description of the braincase anatomy of Pawpawsaurus campbelli based on CT scans is published by Paulina-Carabajal, Lee & Jacobs (2016).[111]
  • A new specimen of Haya griva is described from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia by Norell & Barta (2016).[112]
  • A reassessment of the holotype locality of Leaellynasaura amicagraphica is published by Herne, Tait & Salisbury (2016), who argue that several fossils traditionally referred to L. amicagraphica cannot be confidently attributed to this species.[113]
  • A study on the evolution of the teeth morphologies of the ornithopod dinosaurs is published by Strickson et al. (2016), who argue that major increases of rates of dental character evolution among ornithopods did not correspond to times of plant diversification, including the radiation of the flowering plants.[114]
  • Fossils of a diminutive ornithopod dinosaur, probably a member of Rhabdodontidae, are described from the upper Barremian-lower Aptian Castrillo de la Reina Formation (Cameros Basin, Spain) by Dieudonné et al. (2016).[115]
  • A new specimen of Valdosaurus canaliculatus, the most complete yet found, is described by Barrett (2016).[116]
  • Tibia and tail vertebrae of iguanodontian dinosaurs are described from the Cleaver Bank (North Sea) by Mulder & Fraaije (2016).[117]
  • Isolated teeth of large-bodied iguanodontians are described from the Early Cretaceous (Albian) of Tunisia by Fanti et al. (2016).[118]
  • Parallel trackways of medium-sized and robust ornithopods similar to Draconyx or Cumnoria, providing evidence of gregarious behavior, are described from the Late Jurassic of Spain by Piñuela et al. (2016).[119]
  • A mandible of Telmatosaurus transsylvanicus exhibiting ameloblastoma is described from the Late Cretaceous Sînpetru Formation (Hațeg Basin, Romania) by Dumbravă et al. (2016).[120]
  • A revision of the original diagnosis of Willinakaqe salitralensis and of fossil material attributed to this species is published by Cruzado Caballero and Coria (2016), who argue that the fossils attributed to Willinakaqe salitralensis might represent more than a single taxon of hadrosaurid and that all characters of the original diagnosis are invalid.[121]
  • Large ornithopod (probably hadrosaurid) tracks, assigned to the ichnogenus Hadrosauropodus, are described from the Maastrichtian-Danian Yacoraite Formation of Argentina by Díaz-Martínez, de Valais & Cónsole-Gonella (2016).[122]
  • A hadrosaurid radius and ulna affected by a severe septic arthritis are described from the Late Cretaceous Navesink Formation (New Jersey, USA) by Anné, Hedrick & Schein (2016).[123]
  • A study on the development of the dental battery of the hadrosaurid dinosaurs through their ontogeny and on the evolution of the hadrosaurid dental battery is published by LeBlanc et al. (2016).[124]
  • Chondroid bone (a tissue intermediate between bone and cartilage) is reported in embryos and nestlings of Hypacrosaurus by Bailleul et al. (2016).[125]
  • Restudies of the fossil material attributed to Stegoceras novomexicanum are published by Williamson & Brusatte (2016)[126] and Jasinski & Sullivan (2016).[127]
  • A study on the skull anatomy of Yinlong downsi is published by Han et al. (2016).[128]
  • A study of the bristle-like appendages on the tail of Psittacosaurus is published by Mayr et al. (2016).[129]
  • A study on the color patterns of a well-preserved specimen of Psittacosaurus sp. as indicated by the distribution of organic residues is published by Vinther et al. (2016).[130]
  • A study on the dental microwear in Leptoceratops gracilis is published by Varriale (2016).[131]
  • A study of the frill bones of Protoceratops andrewsi, indicating that its frill increased in length and width during the ontogeny of the animal and that the growth of the frill was greater than the overall growth of the animal, is published by Hone, Wood & Knell (2016), who interpret these findings as indicating that Protoceratops most likely used its frill for sexual and social dominance signaling.[132]
  • Partial skull of a ceratopsid related to Nasutoceratops titusi is described from the Late Cretaceous Oldman Formation (Alberta, Canada) by Ryan et al. (2016), who also name new ceratopsid tribes Centrosaurini and Nasutoceratopsini.[133]
  • A revision of the species assigned to the genus Chasmosaurus is published by Campbell et al. (2016).[134]
  • Forelimb studies show Oryctodromeus was extremely adapted for an underground lifestyle (2016).[135]
  • A group of paleontologists discovered the remains of the smallest specimen of Pachycephalosaurus to date. The specimen also casts doubt on the validity of Dracorex and Stygimoloch (2016).[136][137]
  • A study was done on the skulls of Majungasaurus and revealed changes throughout the life cycle of this dinosaur (2016).[138]
  • A study was conducted on the skeleton of Nasutoceratops, revealing that it and Avaceratops belonged to a completely new group of centrosaurines (2016).[139]

New taxa[edit]

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Agujaceratops mavericus[140]

Sp. nov

Valid[141]

Lehman, Wick & Barnes

Late Cretaceous

Aguja Formation

 United States
( Texas)

A chasmosaurine ceratopsian.

Alcovasaurus[142]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid

Galton & Carpenter

Late Jurassic

Morrison Formation

 United States
( Wyoming)

A stegosaur; a new genus for "Stegosaurus" longispinus Gilmore (1914). This species was previously made the type species of the new genus Natronasaurus by Ulansky (2014); however, Galton & Carpenter (2016) claim it did not meet the requirements of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature.[142]

Aoniraptor[143]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Motta et al.

Late Cretaceous (middle Cenomanian-early Turonian)

Huincul Formation

 Argentina

A theropod dinosaur of uncertain phylogenetic placement, a possible relative of Deltadromeus. The type species is A. libertatem.

Apatoraptor[144]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Funston & Currie

Late Cretaceous

Horseshoe Canyon Formation

 Canada
( Alberta)

A caenagnathid theropod. The type species is Apatoraptor pennatus.

Austroposeidon[145]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Bandeira et al.

Late Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian)

Presidente Prudente Formation

 Brazil

A titanosaur sauropod. The type species is A. magnificus.

Beipiaognathus[146]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Hu, Wang & Huang

Early Cretaceous

Yixian Formation

 China

A compsognathid theropod. The type species is B. jii.

Buriolestes[58]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Cabreira et al.

Late Triassic (Carnian)

Santa Maria Formation

 Brazil

A basal member of Sauropodomorpha. The type species is B. schultzi.

Datonglong[147]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Xu et al.

Late Cretaceous

Huiquanpu Formation

 China

A non-hadrosaurid hadrosauroid ornithopod. The type species is Datonglong tianzhenensis.

Dracoraptor[148]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Martill et al.

Early Jurassic (Hettangian)

Blue Lias Formation

 United Kingdom

A basal member of Neotheropoda. The type species is Dracoraptor hanigani.

Eotrachodon[149][150]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Prieto-Marquez, Erickson & Ebersole

Late Cretaceous (latest Santonian)

Mooreville Chalk

 United States
( Alabama)

A hadrosaurid ornithopod. The type species is Eotrachodon orientalis.

Foraminacephale[151]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid

Schott & Evans

Late Cretaceous (Campanian)

 Canada
( Alberta)

A new genus for "Stegoceras" brevis Lambe (1918).

Fukuivenator[152]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Azuma et al.

Early Cretaceous (Barremian or Aptian)

Kitadani Formation

 Japan

A member of Maniraptora of uncertain phylogenetic placement. The type species is Fukuivenator paradoxus.

Gastonia lorriemcwhinneyae[153]

Sp. nov

Valid

Kinneer, Carpenter & Shaw

Early Cretaceous

Cedar Mountain Formation

 United States
( Utah)

?Gryposaurus alsatei[154]

Sp. nov

Valid

Lehman, Wick & Wagner

Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian)

Javelina Formation

 United States
( Texas)

A hadrosaurid, possibly a species of Gryposaurus.

Gualicho[155]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Apesteguía et al.

Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian to Turonian)

Huincul Formation

 Argentina

A theropod dinosaur of uncertain phylogenetic placement, a possible relative of Deltadromeus. The taxon informally referred to as "Nototyrannus" before its formal description. The type species is G. shinyae.

Lohuecotitan[156]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Díaz et al.

Late Cretaceous (late Campanian-early Maastrichtian)

 Spain

A titanosaur sauropod. The type species is L. pandafilandi.

Machairoceratops[157]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Lund et al.

Late Cretaceous (Campanian)

Wahweap Formation

 United States
( Utah)

A centrosaurine ceratopsian. The type species is Machairoceratops cronusi.

Magnamanus[158]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Fuentes Vidarte et al.

Early Cretaceous (late Hauterivian or early Barremian)

Golmayo Formation

 Spain

A basal member of Styracosterna. The type species is M. soriaensis.

Meroktenos[159]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid

Peyre de Fabrègues & Allain

Late Triassic

Lower Elliot Formation

 Lesotho

A non-sauropod sauropodomorph. The type species is "Melanorosaurus" thabanensis Gauffre (1993).

Morrosaurus[160]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Rozadilla et al.

Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian)

López de Bertodano Formation

 Antarctica

An iguanodontian ornithopod. The type species is Morrosaurus antarcticus.

Murusraptor[161]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Coria & Currie

Late Cretaceous (Coniacian)

Sierra Barrosa Formation

 Argentina

A theropod belonging to the group Megaraptora. The type species is M. barrosaensis.

Notocolossus[162]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

González Riga et al.

Late Cretaceous (late Coniacian–early Santonian)

Plottier Formation

 Argentina

A titanosaur sauropod. The type species is Notocolossus gonzalezparejasi.

Rativates[163]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

McFeeters et al.

Late Cretaceous (late Campanian)

Dinosaur Park Formation

 Canada
( Alberta)

An ornithomimid theropod. The type species is R. evadens.

Sarmientosaurus[164]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Martínez et al.

Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian-Turonian)

Bajo Barreal Formation

 Argentina

A titanosaur sauropod, a basal member of Lithostrotia. The type species is Sarmientosaurus musacchioi.

Savannasaurus[165]

Gen. et sp. nov

Poropat et al.

Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian-early Turonian)

Winton Formation

 Australia

A titanosaur sauropod. The type species is S. elliottorum.

Spiclypeus[166]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Mallon et al.

Late Cretaceous (late Campanian)

Judith River Formation

 United States
( Montana)

A chasmosaurine ceratopsian. The type species is Spiclypeus shipporum.

Taurovenator[143]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Motta et al.

Late Cretaceous (middle Cenomanian-early Turonian)

Huincul Formation

 Argentina

A carcharodontosaurid theropod. The type species is T. violantei.

Timurlengia[167]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Brusatte et al.

Late Cretaceous (Turonian)

Bissekty Formation

 Uzbekistan

A non-tyrannosaurid tyrannosauroid. The type species is Timurlengia euotica.

Tongtianlong[168]

Gen. et sp. nov

et al.

Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian)

Nanxiong Formation

 China

An oviraptorid theropod. The type species is T. limosus.

Tototlmimus[169]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Serrano-Brañas et al.

Late Cretaceous

Packard Shale Formation

 Mexico

An ornithomimid theropod. The type species is Tototlmimus packardensis.

Viavenator[170]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Filippi et al.

Late Cretaceous (Santonian)

Bajo de la Carpa Formation

 Argentina

A brachyrostran abelisaurid theropod. The type species is Viavenator exxoni.

Wiehenvenator [171]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

Rauhut, Hübner & Lanser

Middle Jurassic (Callovian)

Ornatenton Formation

 Germany

A megalosaurid theropod. The type species is W. albati.

Birds[edit]

Research[edit]

  • A study on the rates of morphological evolution in Early Cretaceous birds is published by Wang and Lloyd (2016).[172]
  • A study on the microbodies associated with feathers of a new specimen of Eoconfuciusornis from the Early Cretaceous Huajiying Formation (China) and on the matrix in which the microbodies were embedded is published by Pan et al. (2016), who interpret the microbodies as melanosomes.[173]
  • Remains of non-plumage soft tissues, including scales, toe pads, skin and muscle, are identified in two specimens of Confuciusornis by Falk et al. (2016).[174]
  • A skeleton of an enantiornithine bird preserving a gastric pellet that includes fish bones is described from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota of China by Wang, Zhou & Sullivan (2016).[175]
  • Two partial wings with vestiges of soft tissues, probably belonging to precocial hatchlings of enantiornithine birds, are described from the Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Burmese amber by Xing et al. (2016).[176]
  • A revised diagnosis of Cerebavis cenomanica, a study on the braincase anatomy of the species and a study on its phylogenetic relationships is published by Walsh, Milner & Bourdon (2016).[177]
  • A study on the shape, growth, attachment, implantation, replacement, and tissue microstructures of the teeth of Hesperornis and Ichthyornis is published by Dumont et al. (2016).[178]
  • A phylogenetic analysis of Hesperornithiformes is published by Bell & Chiappe (2016).[179]
  • A specimen of Hesperornis with a healed wound is described from the Late Cretaceous Pierre Shale (South Dakota, United States) by Martin, Rothschild & Burnham (2016), who interpret the wound as caused by an unsuccessful attack of a polycotylid plesiosaur.[180]
  • Pelvic elements of Gargantuavis philoinos, providing new information about the pelvic morphology of the species, are described from the Late Cretaceous (late Campanian/early Maastrichtian) of southern France by Buffetaut & Angst (2016).[181]
  • A specimen of Vegavis iaai with a fossilized syrinx is described from the Late Cretaceous of Antarctica by Clarke et al. (2016).[182]
  • A study on the feeding mechanics and behaviour of five moa species is published by Attard et al. (2016).[183]
  • Mariana B.J. Picasso & María Clelia Mosto, 2016: Hinasuri nehuensis Tambussi was a robust, extinct rheid bird from the early Pliocene of Buenos Aires province, Argentina. This paper revisits the femoral morphology of H. nehuensis and provides an updated osteological description together with new insights into its palaeobiology.[184]
  • Restudies of the Pleistocene species Rhea pampeana and Rhea anchorenensis are published by Picasso (2016) and Picasso and Mosto (2016), respectively, who consider these species to be junior synonyms of the extant greater rhea (Rhea americana).[185][186]
  • Worthy et al. (2016) argue that Sylviornis neocaledoniae is a stem-galliform related to Megavitiornis altirostris and both are placed in the Sylviornithidae Mourer-Chauviré et Balouet, 2005.[187]
  • A revision of the systematics of the early Eocene North American members of Geranoididae is published by Mayr (2016), who argues that geranoidids might be stem group representatives of the Gruoidea (the clade including trumpeters, cranes and related birds).[188]
  • Zelenkov, Boev & Lazaridis (2016) reinterpret Otis hellenica from the Miocene of Greece, originally thought to be a bustard, as a member of Gruiformes belonging to the family Eogruidae and the subfamily Ergilornithinae; the authors classify it as a possible member of the genus Amphipelargus of uncertain specific assignment ("?Amphipelargus sp.").[189]
  • A restudy of the holotype specimen of Bathornis grallator and a study on the taxonomic composition and phylogenetic affinities of bathornithids is published by Mayr (2016).[190]
  • Zelenkov, Volkova and Gorobets (2016) describe buttonquail fossils from the late Miocene of Hungary, southern Ukraine and northern Kazakhstan, and transfer the species Calidris janossyi Kessler (2009) to the genus Ortyxelos.[191]
  • Gerald Mayr and Zbigniew M. Bochenski,(2016) describe a disarticulated postcranial skeleton of a Ralloidea from the Early Oligocene (Rupelian) Jamna Dolna Site 2 in Poland as Gen. et Sp. indet.[192]
  • Agnolin, Tomassini and Contreras (2016) describe a distal end of tarsometatarsus from the late Miocene levels of the Loma de Las Tapias Formation (San Juan Province, Argentina), identified as the oldest seedsnipe fossil discovered so far.[193]
  • Body mass estimates for 25 extinct pan-alcids and a study of body mass evolution in Pan-Alcidae are published by Smith (2016).[194]
  • The earliest known cranial endocast of a stem-penguin (a member of the genus Waimanu) is described from the Paleocene Waipara Greensand (New Zealand) by Proffitt, Clarke & Scofield (2016).[195]
  • Thomas & Ksepka (2016) classify a Whaingaroan penguin from the Glen Massey Formation (North Island, New Zealand), first described in 1973, as a member of the genus Kairuku of uncertain specific assignment, extending the geographic range of the genus.[196]
  • Park et al., 2016 The description of recently collected penguin fossils from the re-dated upper Miocene Port Campbell Limestone of Portland (Victoria), in addition to reanalysis of previously described material, has allowed the Cenozoic history of penguins in Australia to be placed into a global context for the first time. Australian pre-Quaternary fossil penguins represent stem taxa phylogenetically disparate from each other and Eudyptula minor, implying multiple dispersals and extinctions.[197]
  • Carolina Acosta Hospitaleche, Leandro M. Pérez, Sergio Marenssi, Marcelo Reguero (2016). The purpose of this paper is to provide a taphonomic analysis of the holotype of Crossvallia unienwillia, in order to improve the knowledge of the vertebrate record of the Cross Valley Formation, a unit exposed in the central area of Marambio (Seymour) Island, Antarctic Peninsula.[198]
  • A new skeleton of the Eocene penguin Palaeeudyptes klekowskii is described from the Submeseta Formation (Seymour Island, Antarctica) by Acosta Hospitaleche (2016).[199]
  • Carolina Acosta Hospitaleche & Eduardo Olivero, 2016: Eocene penguins are known mostly from Antarctic specimens. A previously documented partial skeleton consisting of a pelvis, femur, tibiotarsus and fibula, from the middle Eocene Leticia Formation, Tierra del Fuego Province, Argentina, has been prepared and re-described. Re-analysis favours assignment to Palaeeudyptes gunnari, a species widely recorded in the Eocene of Antarctica.[200]
  • Fossils of a stork and a heron belonging or related to the tribe Nycticoracini are described from the Pliocene of Myanmar by Stidham et al. (2016).[201]
  • A restudy of the fossils attributed to the species Liornis floweri and Callornis giganteus from the Miocene Santa Cruz Formation (Patagonia, Argentina) is published by Buffetaut (2016), who considers L. floweri to be a junior synonym of Brontornis burmeisteri and considers C. giganteus to be a chimera based on a phorusrhacid tarsometatarsus and a brontornithid tibiotarsus.[202]
  • A study of eggshell fragments from the Pleistocene of Australia putatively referred to Genyornis newtoni is published by Grellet-Tinner, Spooner & Worthy (2016), who argue that these fossils are more likely to be remains of eggs laid by megapodes. Based on the similarities in the structure of eggshells of megapodes and dromornithids, the authors also hypothezise that dromornithids might be a sister group to galliforms rather than to or within anseriforms.[203]
  • A study of burnt putative Genyornis eggshell fragments from the Pleistocene of Australia is published by Miller et al. (2016), who interpret them as confirming that eggs of Genyornis newtoni were harvested by humans.[204]
  • A study on the possible presence, form, and extent of sexual dimorphism in Dromornis stirtoni is published by Handley et al. (2016).[205]
  • Gastornithid and presbyornithid fossils are described from the early Eocene of Ellesmere Island (Canada) by Stidham & Eberle (2016).[206]
  • The genus Wilaru, initially considered to be of a stone-curlew, is reinterpreted as a member of Presbyornithidae by De Pietri et al. (2016); the authors also reassess the Cretaceous species Teviornis gobiensis and confirm it as a member of Presbyornithidae.[207]
  • A revision of anseriform birds known from the late Miocene localities in central Hungary is published by Zelenkov (2016), who transfers the species Anas denesi Kessler (2013) to the genus Aythya and classifies the species Anas albae Janossy (1979) as a member of tribe Mergini of uncertain generic assignment.[208]
  • A revision of galliform birds known from the late Miocene localities in central Hungary is published by Zelenkov (2016), who transfers the subspecies Pavo aesculapi phasianoides Janossy (1991) to the genus Syrmaticus and raises it to the rank of a separate species Syrmaticus phasianoides.[209]
  • New fossil remains of the Eocene cuckoo Chambicuculus pusillus are described from Tunisia by Mourer-Chauviré et al. (2016).[210]
  • Virtual cranial endocast of the dodo is described by Gold, Bourdon & Norell (2016).[211]
  • An ungual phalanx of a large member of Accipitridae belonging to an unknown genus and species is described from the Miocene of Panama by Steadman & MacFadden (2016).[212]
  • Partial tarsometatarsus of a small parrot is described from the Early Miocene Khalagay Formation (Baikal region, Russia) by Zelenkov (2016).[213]
  • A study on the phylogenetic relationships of extant and extinct New Zealand wrens, as indicated by data from novel mitochondrial genome sequences, is published by Mitchell et al. (2016).[214]
  • Fossil avian feet from the Early Eocene of Messel, Germany are described by Gerald Mayr [215]
  • A new tracksite with bird footprints (attributed to the ichnospecies Uvaichnites riojana), preserved in the early Miocene Lerín Formation (Bardenas Reales de Navarra Natural Park, Navarre, Spain), is described by Díaz-Martínez et al. (2016).[216]
  • A new ichnospecies, Koreananornis lii, from the Lower Cretaceous avian track locality in the Guanshan area, Yongjing County, Gansu Province, northwest China, is described by Xing, Buckley, Lockley, Zhang, Marty, Wang, Li, McCrea et Peng, 2016. (2016).[217]
  • An avian egg from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian) Liangtoutang Formation is described by Lawver et al. (2016) and named Pachycorioolithus jinyunensis oogen. et oosp. nov. within Pachycorioolithidae oofam. nov.[218]
  • Three pellets with bird remains are described from the Eocene Messel pit (Germany) by Mayr & Schaal (2016), who interpret two of the pellets as probably produced by snakes or other squamates, and one as probable owl pellet (which, if confirmed, would make it the oldest owl pellet identified so far), possibly produced by the owl Palaeoglaux artophoron.[219]

New taxa[edit]

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Antarctoboenus [220]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

Cenizo, Noriega & Reguero

Early Eocene

La Meseta Formation

 Antarctica

(Seymour Island)

A stem-falconid. The type species is A. carlinii.

Bellulornis [221][222]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

Wang, Zhou & Zhou

Early Cretaceous

Jiufotang Formation

 China

A basal member of Ornithuromorpha. The type species is B. rectusunguis. The original generic name was Bellulia, which turned out to be preoccupied by Bellulia Fibiger (2008).

Calciavis [223]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

Nesbitt & Clarke

Early Eocene

Green River Formation

 United States
( Wyoming)

A member of Lithornithidae. The type species is C. grandei.

Centropus bairdi [224]

Sp. nov.

Valid

Shute, Prideaux & Worthy

Pleistocene

 Australia

A member of the Cuculidae.

Centropus maximus [224]

Sp. nov.

Valid

Shute, Prideaux & Worthy

Pleistocene

 Australia

A member of the Cuculidae.

Changzuiornis [225]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

Huang et al.

Early Cretaceous (Aptian)

Jiufotang Formation

 China

An early member of Euornithes. The type species is C. ahgmi.

Chiappeavis [226]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

O’Connor et al.

Early Cretaceous

Jiufotang Formation

 China

A member of Enantiornithes, probably belonging to the family Pengornithidae. The type species is C. magnapremaxillo.

Chionoides [227]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

De Pietri et al.

Late Oligocene

 Australia

A member of Chionoidea of uncertain phylogenetic placement, showing the mosaic of characters shared with both sheathbills and the Magellanic plover. The type species is C. australiensis.

Chongmingia [228]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

Wang et al.

Early Cretaceous (Aptian)

Jiufotang Formation

 China

A member of Avialae of uncertain phylogenetic placement. The type species is C. zhengi.

Cypseloramphus [229]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

Mayr

Early Eocene

Messel pit

 Germany

Possibly a basal member of Apodiformes. The type species is C. dimidius.

Daphoenositta trevorworthyi [230]

Sp. nov.

Valid

Nguyen

Miocene

Riversleigh World Heritage Area

 Australia

A sittella

Dingavis [231]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid [232]

O'Connor, Wang & Hu

Early Cretaceous

Yixian Formation

 China

A basal member of Ornithuromorpha. The type species is D. longimaxilla.

Dromornis murrayi [233]

Sp. nov.

Valid

Worthy et al.

Late Oligocene–Early Miocene

Riversleigh

 Australia

A member of Dromornithidae

Eostrix gulottai [234]

Sp. nov.

Valid

Mayr

Early Eocene

Nanjemoy Formation

 United States
( Virginia)

An early owl of the family Protostrigidae.

Eurobambusicola [209]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

Zelenkov

Late Miocene

 Hungary

A member of the family Phasianidae. The type species is E. turolicus.

Galligeranoides [235]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

Bourdon, Mourer-Chauviré, & Laurent

middle Ypresian

 France

A bird of uncertain phylogenetic placement, might be a member of the family Geranoididae[235] or a member of Palaeognathae related to Palaeotis.[236] The type species is G. boriensis.

Gallinago kakuki [237]

Sp. nov.

Valid

Steadman & Takano

Late Quaternary

 The Bahamas
 Cayman Islands
 Cuba

A member of Scolopacidae, a species of Gallinago.

Hesperornis lumgairi [238]

Sp. nov.

Valid

Aotsuka & Sato

Campanian

Pierre Shale

 Canada

A species of Hesperornis.

Klallamornis abyssa [239]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

Mayr & Goedert

Latest Eocene or Early Oligocene

 United States
( Washington)

A member of Plotopteridae. This is the type species of the new genus.

?Klallamornis clarki [239]

Sp. nov.

Valid

Mayr & Goedert

Latest Eocene or Early Oligocene

 United States
( Washington)

A member of Plotopteridae. possibly a species of Klallamornis.

Lapillavis [229]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

Mayr

Early Eocene

Messel pit

 Germany

A bird of uncertain phylogenetic placement, showing similarities to Foshanornis songi. The type species is L. incubarens.

Linyiornis [240]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

Wang et al.

Early Cretaceous

Jiufotang Formation

 China

A member of Enantiornithes. The type species is L. amoena.

Mioneophron [241]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

Li et al.

Late Miocene

Liushu Formation

 China

A member of Gypaetinae Vieillot (1816). The type species is M. longirostris.

Mioryaba [209]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

Zelenkov

Late Miocene

 Hungary

A member of the family Phasianidae. The type species is M. magyarica.

Monoenantiornis [242]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid[243]

Hu & O’Connor

Early Cretaceous

Yixian Formation

 China

A member of Enantiornithes. The type species is M. sihedangia.

Neilus [227]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

De Pietri et al.

Early Miocene

 New Zealand

A member of Chionoidea of uncertain phylogenetic placement, showing the mosaic of characters shared with both sheathbills and the Magellanic plover. The type species is N. sansomae.

Notoleptos [244]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Acosta Hospitaleche & Gelfo

Late Eocene

 Antarctica

(Seymour Island)

A probable relative of albatrosses. The type species is N. giglii.

Olympidytes [239]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

Mayr & Goedert

Latest Eocene or Early Oligocene

 United States
( Washington)

A member of Plotopteridae. The type species is O. thieli.

Phalcoboenus napieri [245]

Sp. nov.

Valid

Adams & Woods

Holocene

 Falkland Islands

A member of Phalcoboenus.

Primozygodactylus longibrachium [246]

Sp. nov.

Valid

Mayr

Early Eocene

Messel pit

 Germany

A member of Zygodactylidae.

Primozygodactylus quintus [246]

Sp. nov.

Valid

Mayr

Early Eocene

Messel pit

 Germany

A member of Zygodactylidae.

Protomelanitta bakeri [247]

Sp. nov.

Valid

Stidham & Zelenkov

Miocene

Esmeralda Formation

 United States
( Nevada)

A primitive diving duck.

Pseudoseisuropsis wintu [248]

Sp. nov.

Valid

Stefanini, Gómez & Tambussi

Early Pleistocene

Miramar Formation

 Argentina

An ovenbird

Rallus nanus [249]

Nom. nov.

Valid

Alcover et al.

Holocene

 Azores

A member of Rallidae, a species of Rallus; a replacement name for Rallus minutus Alcover et al. (2015) (preoccupied).

Septencoracias [250]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Valid

Bourdon, Kristoffersen & Bonde

Eocene (Ypresian)

Fur Formation

 Denmark

A member of Coracii belonging to the family Primobucconidae. The type species is S. morsensis.

Tingmiatornis [251]

Gen. et sp. nov.

Wang et al.

Late Cretaceous (Turonian)

 Canada
( Nunavut)

A member of Ornithurae of uncertain phylogenetic placement. The type species is T. arctica.

Uria onoi [252]

Sp. nov.

Valid

Watanabe et al.

Late Pleistocene

 Japan

A member of Alcidae

Wilaru prideauxi [207]

Sp. nov.

Valid

De Pietri et al.

Early Miocene

Etadunna Formation
Wipajiri Formation

 Australia

A species of Wilaru.

Pterosaurs[edit]

Research[edit]

New taxa[edit]

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Allkaruen[257]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Codorniú et al.

Early-Middle Jurassic

Cañadón Asfalto Formation

 Argentina

A non-pterodactyloid member of Breviquartossa. The type species is A. koi.

Aymberedactylus[258]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Pêgas, Leal & Kellner

Early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian)

Crato Formation

 Brazil

A member of Tapejarinae. The type species is A. cearensis.

Forfexopterus[259]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Jiang et al.

Early Cretaceous

Jiufotang Formation

 China

A member of Archaeopterodactyloidea. The type species is F. jeholensis.

Huaxiapterus atavismus[260]

Sp. nov

Valid

et al.

Early Cretaceous

Jiufotang Formation

 China

Pangupterus[261]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

et al.

Early Cretaceous

Jiufotang Formation

 China

A toothed member of Pterodactyloidea. The type species is P. liui.

Sinopterus lingyuanensis[260]

Sp. nov

Valid

et al.

Early Cretaceous

Jiufotang Formation

 China

References[edit]

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