2017–18 UCI Cyclo-cross World Cup

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2017–18 UCI Cyclo-cross World Cup
Details
Location
  • United States
  • Belgium
  • Denmark
  • Germany
  • France
  • Netherlands
Rounds 9
Champions
Male individual champion  Mathieu van der Poel (NED) (Beobank–Corendon & Corendon–Circus[a])
Female individual champion  Sanne Cant (BEL) (IKO–Beobank)

The 2017–18 Telenet UCI Cyclo-cross World Cup was a season long cyclo-cross competition, organised by the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI). The UCI Cyclo-cross World Cup took place between 17 September 2017 and 28 January 2018, over a total of nine events. The defending champions were Wout van Aert in the men's competition and Sophie de Boer in the women's competition.

Both elite titles were won at the penultimate round of the season at Nommay. Despite finishing twelfth in the race, Sanne Cant won the women's title after her closest rival Kaitlin Keough finished the Nommay race in second behind compatriot Katie Compton.[1] Cant was the only female rider to win more than once, winning five times during the season. Other races were won by Kateřina Nash, Maud Kaptheijns and Evie Richards, who became the first under-23 woman to win an elite race, when she won at Namur.

In the men's competition, Mathieu van der Poel won each of the first four races to build up a lead on van Aert and the rest. Van Aert won the next two races in Germany and at Namur, but with wins at Heusden-Zolder and Nommay,[2] van der Poel gathered an unassailable lead going into the final round at Hoogerheide; he won that race as well, garnering podium finishes at all nine events during the campaign.

The men's under-23 title was won by Tom Pidcock, having won four World Cup races in as many starts, giving him an unassailable lead after the Grand Prix Erik De Vlaeminck at Circuit Zolder,[3] as a rider's best four scores (from seven races) counted towards the classification.[4] The women's under-23 title was won by Fleur Nagengast, while the junior men's title went to Tomáš Kopecký.

Points distribution[edit]

Points were awarded to all eligible riders each race. The top ten finishers received points according to the following table:

Points awarded
Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Elite riders[5][b] 80 70 65 60 55 50 48 46 44 42
U23/Junior riders[5] 60 50 45 40 35 30 28 26 24 22
  • Elite riders finishing in positions 11 to 50 also received points, going down from 40 points for 11th place by one point per place to 1 point for 50th place.[5]
  • For the age group riders (excluding under-23 women), those finishing in positions 11 to 30 also received points, going down from 20 points for 11th place by one point per place to 1 point for 30th place.[5] As well as this, only the top four scores for each rider count towards the World Cup standings.[4]

Events[edit]

In comparison to last season, the races in Las Vegas, Rome (Fiuggi) and Valkenburg were replaced by Bogense, Nommay and Waterloo. The race in Bogense marked the first ever Cyclo-cross World Cup in Denmark, as a precursor to the 2019 UCI Cyclo-cross World Championships being held there.[8]

Date Race Location Winners
Elite men Elite women Under-23 men Junior men
17 September Jingle Cross United States Iowa City, United States  Mathieu van der Poel (NED)  Kateřina Nash (CZE) No under-23 or junior race
24 September World Cup Waterloo United States Waterloo, United States  Mathieu van der Poel (NED)  Sanne Cant (BEL)
2 October Duinencross Koksijde Belgium Koksijde, Belgium  Mathieu van der Poel (NED)  Maud Kaptheijns (NED)  Tom Pidcock (GBR)  Pim Ronhaar (NED)
19 November CrossDenmark Denmark Bogense, Denmark  Mathieu van der Poel (NED)  Sanne Cant (BEL)  Tom Pidcock (GBR)  Tomáš Kopecký (CZE)
25 November Poldercross Zeven Germany Zeven, Germany  Wout van Aert (BEL)  Sanne Cant (BEL)  Eli Iserbyt (BEL)  Pim Ronhaar (NED)
17 December Citadelcross Belgium Namur, Belgium  Wout van Aert (BEL)  Evie Richards (GBR)  Tom Pidcock (GBR)  Loris Rouiller (SUI)
26 December Grand Prix Erik De Vlaeminck Belgium Heusden-Zolder, Belgium  Mathieu van der Poel (NED)  Sanne Cant (BEL)  Tom Pidcock (GBR)  Tomáš Kopecký (CZE)
21 January Grand Prix Nommay France Nommay, France  Mathieu van der Poel (NED)  Katie Compton (USA)  Thijs Aerts (BEL)  Mees Hendrikx (NED)
28 January Grand Prix Adri van der Poel Netherlands Hoogerheide, Netherlands  Mathieu van der Poel (NED)  Sanne Cant (BEL)  Eli Iserbyt (BEL)  Niels Vandeputte (BEL)

Final points standings[edit]

Elite men[edit]

Pos. Rider JIN
United States
WAT
United States
KOK
Belgium
BOG
Denmark
ZEV
Germany
NAM
Belgium
ZOL
Belgium
NOM
France
HOO
Netherlands
Points
1  Mathieu van der Poel (NED) 1 1 1 1 2 3 1 1 1 695
2  Wout van Aert (BEL) 14 7 3 2 1 1 3 2 2 585
3  Toon Aerts (BEL) 7 8 11 3 3 2 8 3 7 493
4  Michael Vanthourenhout (BEL) 6 4 8 9 5 5 9 5 3 474
5  Laurens Sweeck (BEL) 2 21 4 7 19 8 2 6 4 466
6  Kevin Pauwels (BEL) 4 6 12 10 6 4 12 10 5 437
7  Corné van Kessel (NED) 12 2 14 6 4 6 6 18 12 428
8  Tim Merlier (BEL) 17 5 22 5 13 12 7 4 6 408
9  Lars van der Haar (NED) 5 17 2 4 11 19 4 Ret 9 395
10  Daan Soete (BEL) 11 3 6 20 17 9 5 13 13 395
120 riders scored points[9]

Elite women[edit]

Pos. Rider JIN
United States
WAT
United States
KOK
Belgium
BOG
Denmark
ZEV
Germany
NAM
Belgium
ZOL
Belgium
NOM
France
HOO
Netherlands
Points
1  Sanne Cant (BEL) 3 1 3 1 1 12 1 12 1 608
2  Kaitlin Keough (USA) 2 2 8 3 11 6 16 2 5 501
3  Eva Lechner (ITA) 10 13 11 4 7 3 3 7 2 476
4  Nikki Brammeier (GBR) 9 19 9 10 8 2 11 14 8 401
5  Katie Compton (USA) 19 42 5 DNS 3 4 2 1 22 400
6  Kateřina Nash (CZE) 1 6 6 4 7 14 11 20 396
7  Helen Wyman (GBR) 16 25 7 2 2 15 27 4 27 393
8  Ellen Van Loy (BEL) 12 7 12 5 23 11 8 9 15 375
9  Maud Kaptheijns (NED) 5 10 1 28 18 9 19 10 351
10  Sophie de Boer (NED) 4 4 2 11 5 13 37 337
123 total riders[c] scored points[10]

Under-23 men[edit]

Pos. Rider KOK
Belgium
BOG
Denmark
ZEV
Germany
NAM
Belgium
ZOL
Belgium
NOM
France
HOO
Netherlands
Points
1  Tom Pidcock (GBR) 1 1 1 1 (2) 240
2  Eli Iserbyt (BEL) (3) (2) 1 2 2 1 220
3  Thijs Aerts (BEL) 4 (8) 2 (10) 5 1 (7) 185
4  Adam Ťoupalík (CZE) 2 5 8 (9) 4 (21) 151
5  Yannick Peeters (BEL) (7) 7 4 (28) (18) 4 5 143
6  Sieben Wouters (NED) 8 3 (Ret) 4 6 (16) (11) 141
7  Toon Vandebosch (BEL) 6 4 6 (19) (11) (14) 4 140
8  Joris Nieuwenhuis (NED) 11 (16) (Ret) (Ret) 3 7 3 138
9  Joshua Dubau (FRA) (28) (10) 5 6 9 3 (18) 134
10  Jakob Dorigoni (ITA) (22) (Ret) 5 7 12 8 108
72 riders scored points[11]

Under-23 women[edit]

Pos. Rider JIN
United States
WAT
United States
KOK
Belgium
BOG
Denmark
ZEV
Germany
NAM
Belgium
ZOL
Belgium
NOM
France
HOO
Netherlands
Points
1  Fleur Nagengast (NED) 24 18 18 16 20 28 23 16 28 268
2  Ceylin del Carmen Alvarado (NED) 20 14 14 27 15 17 9 243
3  Laura Verdonschot (BEL) 15 9 10 7 Ret 170
4  Emma White (USA) 11 8 21 18 31 169
5  Inge van der Heijden (NED) 34 30 Ret 23 22 26 12 159
6  Evie Richards (GBR) 1 3 145
7  Nadja Heigl (AUT) 36 32 37 20 30 31 40 131
8  Marion Norbert-Riberolle (FRA) 33 24 34 36 41 20 46 123
9  Nikola Nosková (CZE) 22 22 21 38 101
10  Manon Bakker (NED) 41 32 45 21 29 87
43 riders scored points[10]

Junior men[edit]

Pos. Rider KOK
Belgium
BOG
Denmark
ZEV
Germany
NAM
Belgium
ZOL
Belgium
NOM
France
HOO
Netherlands
Points
1  Tomáš Kopecký (CZE) (3) 1 2 (7) 1 3 (4) 215
2  Pim Ronhaar (NED) 1 3 1 (8) (7) 5 200
3  Mees Hendrikx (NED) (6) 2 3 (6) (8) 1 3 200
4  Loris Rouiller (SUI) (7) (6) 4 1 5 4 (12) 175
5  Jarno Bellens (BEL) 4 (5) 5 (12) 2 (9) 2 175
6  Niels Vandeputte (BEL) (10) 8 (25) (10) 3 6 1 161
7  Ryan Kamp (NED) 2 (7) (14) 2 (9) 7 7 156
8  Ryan Cortjens (BEL) (12) 7 4 (22) 2 10 140
9  Ben Tulett (GBR) 16 16 3 4 (Ret) 115
10  Luke Verburg (NED) (17) 4 6 (37) 11 (22) 16 105
74 riders scored points[12]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ In the 2017 races, van der Poel rode for Beobank–Corendon, and for Corendon–Circus in the 2018 races.
  2. ^ Women's under-23 riders were awarded points on the elite scale, as all women competed within the same race.[6] Two jerseys were awarded; one for the leading elite woman and one for the leading under-23 woman.[7]
  3. ^ This tally included 43 under-23 riders, which the UCI awarded a separate jersey for.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Decaluwé, Brecht (21 January 2018). "Compton dominates in Nommay World Cup". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Retrieved 28 January 2018. In the World Cup standings, Cant clinched the overall win as she enjoys a bonus of more than 80 points on Keough, with only 80 points at stake for the winner at the final round in Hoogerheide next week.
  2. ^ Decaluwé, Brecht (21 January 2018). "Van der Poel reigns yet again in the mud". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Retrieved 28 January 2018. Thanks to his sixth World Cup win of he season, Van der Poel also racked up the overall victory in the World Cup.
  3. ^ "Pidcock guarantees 2017/18 Telenet UCI Cyclo-Cross World Cup U23 crown with Belgium victory". British Cycling. British Cycling Federation. Sportsbeat. 26 December 2017. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  4. ^ a b Rules, p. 21.
  5. ^ a b c d Rules, p. 20.
  6. ^ Rules, p. 2.
  7. ^ a b Rules, p. 22.
  8. ^ "2017-2018 Telenet UCI Cyclo-cross World Cup: All you need to know". UCI.ch. Union Cycliste Internationale. 13 September 2017. Retrieved 27 December 2017. Almost one year before hosting the 2019 UCI Cyclo-cross World Championships, Bogense will be hosting its first ever UCI World Cup round.
  9. ^ "Men Elite: Individual Standings" (PDF). Chronorace.be. ChronoRace - Electronic Timing SPRL. 28 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  10. ^ a b "Women Elite: Individual Standings" (PDF). Chronorace.be. ChronoRace - Electronic Timing SPRL. 28 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  11. ^ "Men Under 23: Individual Standings" (PDF). Chronorace.be. ChronoRace - Electronic Timing SPRL. 28 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  12. ^ "Men Junior: Individual Standings" (PDF). Chronorace.be. ChronoRace - Electronic Timing SPRL. 28 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]