2017 AG13

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2017 AG13
Discovery[1]
Discovered byCatalina Sky Survey
Discovery siteMount Lemmon/Catalina Sky Survey (703)
Discovery dateJanuary 7, 2017
Designations
Aten asteroid
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 16 February 2017 (JD 2457800.5)
Uncertainty parameter 6
Observation arc2 days
Aphelion1.37626 AU
Perihelion0.55012 AU
0.96319 AU
Eccentricity0.42886
0.95 years (345.27 days)
330.87°
Inclination16.450°
289.26420°
297.885°
Earth MOID0.0000567 AU
Venus MOID0.0555 AU
Physical characteristics
Dimensions13–41 meters
26.1

2017 AG13 is an Aten asteroid that made a close approach of 0.54 lunar distances from Earth on January 9, 2017.[3] It was the largest asteroid to pass less than 1 lunar distance from Earth since 2016 QA2 on August 28, 2016. The Catalina Sky Survey discovered it on January 7, 2017, only two days before its closest approach. At its brightest, 2017 AG13 reached apparent magnitude 14.8.[2] Shortly after, it moved too close to the Sun to be seen by telescopes.

The asteroid frequently makes close approaches to Earth, possibly passing as close as 127,000 kilometres (79,000 mi) to Earth on January 9, 2069, however it will most likely pass much further away.

2017 AG13 is most likely 13–41 metres (43–135 feet) across, assuming a typical asteroid albedo of between 0.05 and 0.3.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "IAU Minor Planet Center - 2017 AG13". www.minorplanetcenter.net. IAU. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  2. ^ a b "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2017 AG13)".
  3. ^ "Newly discovered asteroid 2017 AG13 to flyby Earth at 0.53 LD". The Watchers - Daily news service. Retrieved 2 February 2017.

External links[edit]