2017 Australian Open

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2017 Australian Open
Australian Open Logo 2017.png
Date 16–29 January
Edition 105th
Category Grand Slam
Draw 128S / 64D /
Prize money A$ 50,000,000
Surface Hard (Plexicushion)
Location Melbourne, Australia
Venue Melbourne Park
Attendance 728,763
Champions
Men's Singles
Switzerland Roger Federer
Women's Singles
United States Serena Williams
Men's Doubles
Finland Henri Kontinen / Australia John Peers
Women's Doubles
United States Bethanie Mattek-Sands / Czech Republic Lucie Šafářová
Mixed Doubles
United States Abigail Spears / Colombia Juan Sebastián Cabal
Boys' Singles
Hungary Zsombor Piros
Girls' Singles
Ukraine Marta Kostyuk
Boys' Doubles
Chinese Taipei Hsu Yu-hsiou / China Zhao Lingxi
Girls' Doubles
Canada Bianca Andreescu / United States Carson Branstine
Wheelchair Men's Singles
Argentina Gustavo Fernández
Wheelchair Women's Singles
Japan Yui Kamiji
Wheelchair Quad Singles
Australia Dylan Alcott
Wheelchair Men's Doubles
Belgium Joachim Gérard / United Kingdom Gordon Reid
Wheelchair Women's Doubles
Netherlands Jiske Griffioen / Netherlands Aniek van Koot
Wheelchair Quad Doubles
United Kingdom Andrew Lapthorne / United States David Wagner
← 2016 · Australian Open · 2018 →

The 2017 Australian Open was a tennis tournament that took place at Melbourne Park between 16–29 January 2017. It was the 105th edition of the Australian Open, and the first Grand Slam tournament of the year. The tournament consisted of events for professional players in singles, doubles and mixed doubles play. Junior and wheelchair players competed in singles and doubles tournaments. As in previous years, the tournament's title sponsor was Kia.

Novak Djokovic and Angelique Kerber were the defending champions and both were unsuccessful in their title defence; they lost to Denis Istomin and Coco Vandeweghe in the second and fourth rounds, respectively. For the first time since the 2004 French Open, both No. 1 seeds lost before the quarterfinals, with both Andy Murray and Kerber defeated in the fourth round.

Roger Federer won his eighteenth men's singles Grand Slam title by defeating Rafael Nadal in a five-set final. It was his first major title since 2012 Wimbledon and a rematch of the 2009 Australian Open final, which Nadal won in five sets. Serena Williams overcame her sister Venus in the women's singles final, surpassing Steffi Graf to become the player with the most major wins in the women's game in the Open Era.

Tournament[edit]

Rod Laver Arena where the Finals of the Australian Open took place

The 2017 Australian Open was the 105th edition of the tournament and was held at Melbourne Park in Melbourne, Australia.

The tournament was run by the International Tennis Federation (ITF) and is part of the 2017 ATP World Tour and the 2017 WTA Tour calendars under the Grand Slam category. The tournament consisted of both men's and women's singles and doubles draws as well as a mixed doubles event. There were singles and doubles events for both boys and girls (players under 18), which are part of the Grade A category of tournaments, and also singles, doubles and quad events for men's and women's wheelchair tennis players as part of the NEC tour under the Grand Slam category.

The tournament was played on hard courts and took place over a series of 25 courts, including the three main show courts: Rod Laver Arena, Hisense Arena and Margaret Court Arena.[1]

Broadcast[edit]

In Australia, selected key matches were broadcast live by the Seven Network. The majority of matches was shown on the network's primary channel Channel Seven; however, during news programming nationwide and most night matches in Perth, coverage shifted to either 7Two or 7mate. Additionally, every match was also available to be streamed live through a free 7Tennis mobile app.[2]

Internationally, Eurosport held the rights for Europe, broadcasting matches on Eurosport 1, Eurosport 2 and the Eurosport Player.

Point and prize money distribution[edit]

Point distribution[edit]

Below is a series of tables for each of the competitions showing the ranking points offered for each event.

Senior points[edit]

Event W F SF QF Round of 16 Round of 32 Round of 64 Round of 128 Q Q3 Q2 Q1
Men's Singles 2000 1200 720 360 180 90 45 10 25 16 8 0
Men's Doubles 0 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Women's Singles 1300 780 430 240 130 70 10 40 30 20 2
Women's Doubles 10 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Prize money[edit]

The Australian Open total prize money for 2017 was increased by 14% to a tournament record A$50,000,000.

Event W F SF QF Round of 16 Round of 32 Round of 64 Round of 1281 Q3 Q2 Q1
Singles A$3,700,000 A$1,900,000 A$900,000 A$440,000 A$220,000 A$130,000 A$80,000 A$50,000 A$25,000 A$12,500 A$6,250
Doubles * A$650,000 A$325,000 A$160,500 A$80,000 A$40,000 A$23,000 A$14,800 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Mixed Doubles * A$150,500 A$75,500 A$37,500 A$18,750 A$9,000 A$4,500 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

1Qualifiers prize money was also the Round of 128 prize money.
*per team

Singles players[edit]

2017 Australian Open – Men's Singles
2017 Australian Open – Women's Singles

Day-by-day summaries[edit]

Day 2[edit]

  • Ivo Karlović came from two sets to love down to defeat Horacio Zeballos 6–7, 3–6, 7–5, 6–2, 22–20. The 84 games which were played is the longest Australian Open match (by number of games played) since the introduction of tiebreaks in 1971. Time-wise, the match was the second-longest in Australian Open history, only behind the five-hour and 53-minute 2012 final between Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal. Karlovic also set a new Australian Open record, hitting 75 aces in the match.[3]

Day 4[edit]

Day 6[edit]

Day 7[edit]

  • 50th ranked Mischa Zverev defeated men's No. 1 seed Andy Murray in four sets. The last time Murray fell to an opponent ranked outside the top 50 at a Grand Slam was to 51st-ranked Juan Ignacio Chela at the 2006 Australian Open. Murray is the first top seed to exit the Australian Open this early in the competition since Lleyton Hewitt lost at the same stage in 2003.[8] It marks the first time since 2002 that neither the Men's No. 1 nor the No. 2 seed has reached the Australian Open quarterfinals.[9]
  • Coco Vandeweghe defeated defending champion and women's No. 1 seed Angelique Kerber. The loss marked the first time in the Open era that both men's and women's No. 1 seeds have been knocked out of the Australian Open before the quarterfinals.[10]

Day 8[edit]

Day 9[edit]

Day 10[edit]

Day 11[edit]

Day 12[edit]

  • Rafael Nadal also made the final, making it the ninth time he would meet Roger Federer in a grand slam final.
  • For the first time in the Open era, all four singles finalists were older than 30.[16]
  • All four singles finalists were former world No.1 and multiple Grand Slam champions.

Day 13[edit]

  • After Serena Williams defeated her sister Venus Williams in straight sets, she set a new record by winning the tournament for the 7th time. Serena also reclaimed the No. 1 ranking and claimed her 23rd Grand Slam, surpassing Steffi Graf's Open Era record of 22 Grand Slams.[17]

Day 14[edit]

  • Roger Federer defeated Rafael Nadal in a five-set match, 6–4, 3–6, 6–1, 3–6, 6–3 extending his record for the most Grand Slams won in men's singles to 18 and becoming the first man ever to win at least 5 times in 3 different Grand Slam tournaments each. Nadal was leading the fifth set after breaking Federer's service in the first game, but Federer mounted a comeback, breaking back and then going up another service break. The Swiss held on to win the set and match for his first Major victory over Nadal since the 2007 Wimbledon Championships. Federer, brought to tears when Nadal's challenge to a forehand winner on championship point was ruled unsuccessful, admitted after the match that he would have been "happy to lose" and said, "Tennis is a tough sport, there are no draws but if there was going to be one I would have been very happy to accept a draw tonight and share it with Rafa."[18] The 2017 Australian Open men singles final between Federer and Nadal was the most highly anticipated tennis match in not only the tournament's history but also all of Grand Slam and tennis history.[19][20]

Champions[edit]

Seniors[edit]

Men's Singles[edit]

This was a rematch of the 2009 Australian Open final, which Rafael Nadal won to become the first (and to date, only) Spaniard to win the Australian Open title; as of 2018 it remains his only title at the tournament. The final saw the two holding service for six games of the first set, whilst during the seventh game was the pivotal break of serve giving Federer the opening set. Nadal quickly broke Federer's serve in the second set racing out to a lead that Federer could not overcome, giving him the second set and levelling the match at one set apiece. The third set was a rather lopsided affair seeing Nadal secure his service game only in the fourth game of the set. The fourth set started off competitively with the two holding serve, until Nadal broke in the fourth game of the set, a lead he would never surrender, evening the match at two sets apiece. The decisive fifth set commenced with a break of Federer's serve by Nadal, giving him a lead in the early going; however, Nadal's serve got broken during the sixth game of the set, levelling the match at two sets and three games apiece. Federer won the next three games breaking Nadal's service in the eighth game of the set to allow him to successfully serve out the match in the final ninth game. This was Roger Federer's 18th Grand Slam singles title, the most ever by a man in the history of tennis, and it was his fifth Australian Open title, just one shy of the record co-held by Novak Djokovic and Roy Emerson. [21]Federer would go on to equal this record by defending his title successfully the next year.

Women's Singles[edit]

This was a rematch of the 2003 Australian Open final, where Serena Williams completed the first "Serena Slam" and her career Grand Slam, whilst Serena won five more Australian Open titles in the interim and her sister Venus had no other final appearances at the event. They each broke the others' serve twice to start the match with Venus finally holding serve in the fifth service game and her sister Serena holding her own serve in the subsequent game. The seventh game was the pivotal break of service that Serena Williams got on her sister Venus' serve, costing her the set just a mere three games later. During the second set, the two traded held service games for the first six games to start the set, whilst Venus started serving first. She would get broken again during the seventh game of the set, which eventually surrendered the match to sister Serena. This was Serena Williams' 23 Grand Slam singles title and seventh Australian Open title for her career, both being Open era records, whilst being one shy of Margaret Court's record of 24 in the history of tennis.[22]

Men's Doubles[edit]

Women's Doubles[edit]

Mixed Doubles[edit]

Juniors[edit]

Boys' Singles[edit]

Girls' Singles[edit]

Boys' Doubles[edit]

Girls' Doubles[edit]

Wheelchair events[edit]

Wheelchair Men's Singles[edit]

Wheelchair Women's Singles[edit]

Wheelchair Quad Singles[edit]

Wheelchair Men's Doubles[edit]

Wheelchair Women's Doubles[edit]

Wheelchair Quad Doubles[edit]

Singles seeds[edit]

The following are the seeded players and notable players who withdrew from the event. Seeding are arranged according to ATP and WTA rankings on 9 January 2017,[23][24] while ranking and points before are as of 16 January 2017.[25][26] The rankings afterwards comes from 30 January 2017.[27][28]

Men's singles[edit]

Seed Rank Player Points before Points defending Points won Points after Status
1 1 United Kingdom Andy Murray 12,560 1,200 180 11,540 Fourth round lost to Germany Mischa Zverev
2 2 Serbia Novak Djokovic 11,780 2,000 45 9,825 Second round lost to Uzbekistan Denis Istomin [WC]
3 3 Canada Milos Raonic 5,290 720 360 4,930 Quarter-finals lost to Spain Rafael Nadal [9]
4 4 Switzerland Stan Wawrinka 5,155 180 720 5,695 Semi-finals lost to Switzerland Roger Federer [17]
5 5 Japan Kei Nishikori 5,010 360 180 4,830 Fourth round lost to Switzerland Roger Federer [17]
6 6 France Gaël Monfils 3,625 360 180 3,445 Fourth round lost to Spain Rafael Nadal [9]
7 7 Croatia Marin Čilić 3,605 90 45 3,560 Second round lost to United Kingdom Daniel Evans
8 8 Austria Dominic Thiem 3,415 90 180 3,505 Fourth round lost to Belgium David Goffin [11]
9 9 Spain Rafael Nadal 3,195 10 1,200 4,385 Runner-up lost to Switzerland Roger Federer [17]
10 10 Czech Republic Tomáš Berdych 3,060 360 90 2,790 Third round lost to Switzerland Roger Federer [17]
11 11 Belgium David Goffin 2,750 180 360 2,930 Quarter-finals lost to Bulgaria Grigor Dimitrov [15]
12 12 France Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 2,505 180 360 2,685 Quarter-finals lost to Switzerland Stan Wawrinka [4]
13 14 Spain Roberto Bautista Agut 2,350 180 180 2,350 Fourth round lost to Canada Milos Raonic [3]
14 13 Australia Nick Kyrgios 2,460 90 45 2,415 Second round lost to Italy Andreas Seppi
15 15 Bulgaria Grigor Dimitrov 2,135 90 720 2,765 Semi-finals lost to Spain Rafael Nadal [9]
16 16 France Lucas Pouille 2,131 10 10 2,131 First round lost to Kazakhstan Alexander Bublik [Q]
17 17 Switzerland Roger Federer 1,980 720 2,000 3,260 Champion won against Spain Rafael Nadal [9]
18 18 France Richard Gasquet 1,885 0 90 1,975 Third round lost to Bulgaria Grigor Dimitrov [15]
19 19 United States John Isner 1,850 180 45 1,715 Second round lost to Germany Mischa Zverev
20 21 Croatia Ivo Karlović 1,795 10 90 1,875 Third round lost to Belgium David Goffin [11]
21 23 Spain David Ferrer 1,740 360 90 1,470 Third round lost to Spain Roberto Bautista Agut [13]
22 22 Uruguay Pablo Cuevas 1,780 45 10 1,745 First round lost to Argentina Diego Schwartzman
23 20 United States Jack Sock 1,810 45 90 1,855 Third round lost to France Jo-Wilfried Tsonga [12]
24 24 Germany Alexander Zverev 1,655 10 90 1,735 Third round lost to Spain Rafael Nadal [9]
25 25 France Gilles Simon 1,585 180 90 1,495 Third round lost to Canada Milos Raonic [3]
26 26 Spain Albert Ramos Viñolas 1,435 45 10 1,400 First round lost to Slovakia Lukáš Lacko [Q]
27 27 Australia Bernard Tomic 1,420 180 90 1,330 Third round lost to United Kingdom Daniel Evans
28 29 Spain Feliciano López 1,410 90 10 1,330 First round lost to Italy Fabio Fognini
29 35 Serbia Viktor Troicki 1,225 90 90 1,225 Third round lost to Switzerland Stan Wawrinka [4]
30 31 Spain Pablo Carreño Busta 1,370 10 90 1,450 Third round lost to Uzbekistan Denis Istomin [WC]
31 32 United States Sam Querrey 1,355 10 90 1,435 Third round lost to United Kingdom Andy Murray [1]
32 33 Germany Philipp Kohlschreiber 1,325 10 90 1,405 Third round lost to France Gaël Monfils [6]

Women's singles[edit]

Seed Rank Player Points before Points defending Points won Points after Status
1 1 Germany Angelique Kerber 8,875 2,000 240 7,115 Fourth round lost to United States Coco Vandeweghe
2 2 United States Serena Williams 7,080 1,300 2,000 7,780 Champion won against United States Venus Williams [13]
3 3 Poland Agnieszka Radwańska 5,625 780 70 4,915 Second round lost to Croatia Mirjana Lučić-Baroni
4 4 Romania Simona Halep 5,073 10 10 5,073 First round lost to United States Shelby Rogers
5 5 Czech Republic Karolína Plíšková 4,970 130 430 5,270 Quarter-finals lost to Croatia Mirjana Lučić-Baroni
6 6 Slovakia Dominika Cibulková 4,865 10 130 4,985 Third round lost to Russia Ekaterina Makarova [30]
7 7 Spain Garbiñe Muguruza 4,420 130 430 4,720 Quarter-finals lost to United States Coco Vandeweghe
8 10 Russia Svetlana Kuznetsova 3,745 70 240 3,915 Fourth round lost to Russia Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova [24]
9 9 United Kingdom Johanna Konta 4,055 780 430 3,705 Quarter-finals lost to United States Serena Williams [2]
10 12 Spain Carla Suárez Navarro 2,985 430 70 2,625 Second round lost to Romania Sorana Cîrstea
11 13 Ukraine Elina Svitolina 2,895 70 130 2,955 Third round lost to Russia Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova [24]
12 15 Switzerland Timea Bacsinszky 2,347 70 130 2,407 Third round lost to Australia Daria Gavrilova [22]
13 17 United States Venus Williams 2,240 10 1,300 3,530 Runner-up lost to United States Serena Williams [2]
14 18 Russia Elena Vesnina 2,229 2[29] 130 2,357 Third round lost to United States Jennifer Brady [Q]
15 19 Italy Roberta Vinci 2,210 130 10 2,090 First round lost to United States Coco Vandeweghe
16 16 Czech Republic Barbora Strýcová 2,295 240 240 2,295 Fourth round lost to United States Serena Williams [2]
17 20 Denmark Caroline Wozniacki 2,175 10 130 2,295 Third round lost to United Kingdom Johanna Konta [9]
18 21 Australia Samantha Stosur 2,016 10 10 2,016 First round lost to United Kingdom Heather Watson
19 22 Netherlands Kiki Bertens 1,956 10 10 1,956 First round lost to United States Varvara Lepchenko
20 23 China Zhang Shuai 1,885 470 70 1,485 Second round lost to United States Alison Riske
21 24 France Caroline Garcia 1,765 10 130 1,885 Third round lost to Czech Republic Barbora Strýcová [16]
22 26 Australia Daria Gavrilova 1,665 240 240 1,665 Fourth round lost to Czech Republic Karolína Plíšková [5]
23 25 Russia Daria Kasatkina 1,700 130 10 1,580 First round lost to China Peng Shuai
24 27 Russia Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova 1,620 10 430 2,040 Quarter-finals lost to United States Venus Williams [13]
25 28 Hungary Tímea Babos 1,545 70 10 1,485 First round lost to United States Nicole Gibbs
26 30 Germany Laura Siegemund 1,502 130 10 1,382 First round lost to Serbia Jelena Janković
27 29 Romania Irina-Camelia Begu 1,502 10 70 1,562 Second round lost to Czech Republic Kristýna Plíšková
28 43 France Alizé Cornet 1,242 70 70 1,242 Second round lost to Greece Maria Sakkari
29 46 Puerto Rico Monica Puig 1,215 130 70 1,155 Second round lost to Germany Mona Barthel [Q]
30 34 Russia Ekaterina Makarova 1,377 240 240 1,377 Fourth round lost to United Kingdom Johanna Konta [9]
31 31 Kazakhstan Yulia Putintseva 1,450 130 70 1,390 Second round lost to Latvia Jeļena Ostapenko
32 33 Latvia Anastasija Sevastova 1,425 110 130 1,445 Third round lost to Spain Garbiñe Muguruza [7]

Withdrawn players[edit]

Rank Player Points Before Points defending Points won Points After Withdrawal reason
8 United States Madison Keys 4,137 240 0 3,897 Wrist injury[30]
11 Czech Republic Petra Kvitová 3,485 70 0 3,415 Off-court injury[31]
14 Belarus Victoria Azarenka 2,591 430 0 2,161 Maternity[32]

Doubles seeds[edit]

Mixed doubles[edit]

Team Rank1 Seed
United States Bethanie Mattek-Sands United States Mike Bryan 6 1
India Sania Mirza Croatia Ivan Dodig 16 2
Czech Republic Andrea Hlaváčková France Édouard Roger-Vasselin 26 3
Chinese Taipei Chan Hao-ching Belarus Max Mirnyi 33 4
Chinese Taipei Chan Yung-jan Poland Łukasz Kubot 35 5
Czech Republic Kateřina Siniaková Brazil Bruno Soares 36 6
Czech Republic Lucie Hradecká Czech Republic Radek Štěpánek 46 7
Czech Republic Barbora Krejčíková United States Rajeev Ram 49 8
  • 1 Rankings are as of 9 January 2017.

Main draw wildcard entries[edit]

Main draw qualifier entries[edit]

The qualifying competition took place in Melbourne Park on 11 – 14 January 2017.

Protected ranking[edit]

The following players were accepted directly into the main draw using a protected ranking:

Withdrawals[edit]

The following players were accepted directly into the main tournament, but withdrew with injuries and other reasons.

Before the tournament

Retirements[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "First Glimpse of new-look Margaret Court Arena". Tennis.com.au. Retrieved 6 January 2014. 
  2. ^ Knox, David (17 December 2015). "Seven Tennis 2016: summer guide". TV Tonight. Retrieved 9 January 2016. 
  3. ^ "Karlovic prevails in record Australian Open marathon match". Yahoo. 17 January 2017. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 
  4. ^ "Australian Open: Novak Djokovic upset by Denis Istomin in the second round". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 19 January 2017. Retrieved 20 January 2017. 
  5. ^ "LUCIC-BARONI WINS FIRST MATCH IN OZ SINCE '98 WITH UPSET OF NO. 3 AGA". Tennis. Associated Press. 19 January 2017. Retrieved 21 January 2017. 
  6. ^ "Australian Open 2017: Start time record broken as Grigor Dimitrov defeats Richard Gasquet". The Age. 22 January 2017. Retrieved 22 January 2017. 
  7. ^ Roopanarine, Les (21 January 2017). "Australian Open day six: Gavrilova beats Bacsinszky, Dimitrov v Gasquet and more – live!". The Guardian. Retrieved 21 January 2017. 
  8. ^ "Andy Murray vs Mischa Zverev: World No.1 crashes out of Australian Open in shock four sets defeat". The Daily Telegraph. 22 January 2017. Retrieved 22 January 2017. 
  9. ^ "World No.1 Andy Murray knocked out of the Australian Open". The West. 22 January 2017. Retrieved 22 January 2017. 
  10. ^ "Coco Vandeweghe ousts top seed Angelique Kerber". ESPN. 22 January 2017. Retrieved 23 January 2017. 
  11. ^ a b "David Goffin downs Dominic Thiem as Mirjana Lucic-Baroni reaches first Slam QF in 18 years". Metro. 23 January 2017. Retrieved 23 January 2017. 
  12. ^ "Australian Open: Venus Williams advances to semi-finals with win over Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 24 January 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017. 
  13. ^ "Tennis: Rafael Nadal storms into Australian Open semifinals". The New Zealand Herald. 25 January 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017. 
  14. ^ "Venus Williams Reaches Australian Open Final, Defeating CoCo Vandeweghe". The New York Times. 26 January 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2016. 
  15. ^ "Australian Open 2017: Venus & Serena Williams to meet in final". BBC Sport. 26 January 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2017. 
  16. ^ "Nadal prevails, will meet Federer in Australian Open final". Detroit News. 27 January 2017. Retrieved 28 January 2017. 
  17. ^ "Serena Williams breaks Grand Slam record with Australian Open title". WTA. 28 January 2017. Retrieved 28 January 2017. 
  18. ^ "Emotional Federer savours long-awaited 18th slam win". The Star. 29 January 2017. Retrieved 29 January 2017. 
  19. ^ "The match that transcends tennis". Australian Open. Retrieved 31 January 2017. 
  20. ^ "Fedal XXXV: What the world is saying". Australian Open. Retrieved 31 January 2017. 
  21. ^ Steinberg, Jacob (29 January 2017). "Roger Federer beats Rafael Nadal to win Australian Open men's final – as it happened". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 February 2017. 
  22. ^ Graham, Bryan Armen (28 January 2017). "Serena Williams beats Venus Williams to win the Australian Open – as it happened". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 February 2017. 
  23. ^ ATP World Tour (9 January 2017). "Men's Singles Seeds". Tennis Explorer. Retrieved 2 February 2017. 
  24. ^ WTA Tour (9 January 2017). "Women's Singles Seeds". Tennis Explorer. Retrieved 2 February 2017. 
  25. ^ ATP World Tour (16 January 2017). "Men's Singles Points". Tennis Explorer. Retrieved 2 February 2017. 
  26. ^ WTA Tour (16 January 2017). "Women's Singles Points". Tennis Explorer. Retrieved 2 February 2017. 
  27. ^ ATP World Tour (30 January 2017). "Men's Singles Rankings". Tennis Explorer. Retrieved 2 February 2017. 
  28. ^ WTA Tour (30 January 2017). "Women's Singles Rankings". Tennis Explorer. Retrieved 2 February 2017. 
  29. ^ "Elena Vesnina profile". wtatennis.com. Retrieved 24 January 2017. 
  30. ^ "Madison Keys ruled out of Australian Open". Special Broadcasting Service. 24 December 2016. Retrieved 24 December 2016. 
  31. ^ "Petra Kvitova out for three months after hand surgery following knife attack". BBC. 21 December 2016. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  32. ^ "Victoria Azarenka announces pregnancy". Women's Tennis Association. 15 July 2016. Retrieved 15 July 2016. 
  33. ^ "Lizette Cabrera has been handed a wildcard into the Australian Open". Courier Mail. 29 November 2016. Retrieved 30 November 2016. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
2016 US Open
Grand Slams Succeeded by
2017 French Open