2017 Rugby League World Cup

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2017 (2017) World Cup  ()
2017 Rugby League World Cup logo.svg
Number of teams14
Host countries Australia
 New Zealand
 Papua New Guinea
Winner Australia (11th title)

Matches played28
Attendance382,080 (13,646 per match)
Points scored1264 (45.14 per match)
Tries scored230 (8.21 per match)
Top scorerAustralia Cameron Smith (50)
Top try scorerAustralia Valentine Holmes (12)
 < 2013
2021

The 2017 Rugby League World Cup was the fifteenth staging of the Rugby League World Cup tournament and took place in Australia, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea between 27 October and 2 December 2017.[1] The tournament featured the national teams of 14 Rugby League International Federation member countries who qualified through either standing in the previous tournament or a series of qualification play-off matches. In the final, defending champions Australia, playing in their 14th consecutive final, defeated England at Brisbane's Lang Park.

Host selection[edit]

At the 2010 Rugby League International Federation executive meeting, the New Zealand Rugby League made an early submission to co-host the 2017 tournament with Australia.[2] The Rugby League World Cup was last held in Australia in 2008.[3]

Two formal bids were subsequently received by the RLIF before a November 2012 deadline; the co-host bid from Australia and New Zealand and a bid from South Africa.[4][5][6] On 19 February 2014, it was announced that the joint bid from Australia and New Zealand had won hosting rights.[7]

Michael Brown, the CEO of several big name Australian sporting franchises and the 2015 AFC Asian Cup, was originally appointed CEO of the World Cup in 2015, but resigned less than a year later due to 'workload' and 'homesickness'.[8] He was replaced by Andrew Hill.[9]

Venues[edit]

It was announced in October 2014 that negotiations were being held for Papua New Guinea to host matches.[10] The Papua New Guinea Rugby Football League presented to the RLIF in September 2015, requesting to host three matches.[11] In October 2015 it was confirmed that Papua New Guinea would host three matches in the group stage.[12]

Melbourne Rectangular Stadium in Melbourne hosted the opening game between Australia and England while Brisbane Stadium in Brisbane hosted the World Cup Final.[13]

Australia[edit]

Brisbane Sydney Melbourne Townsville
Brisbane Stadium Sydney Football Stadium Melbourne Rectangular Stadium Townsville Stadium
Capacity: 52,500 Capacity: 45,500 Capacity: 30,050 Capacity: 26,500
Suncorpstadium071006a.JPG Aussie Stadium.jpg AAMI Park, Melbourne Storm v North Queensland Cowboys.jpg 14-05-2005-dairy farmers at dusk.JPG
Canberra Perth Cairns Darwin
Canberra Stadium Perth Rectangular Stadium Barlow Park Darwin Stadium
Capacity: 25,011 Capacity: 20,500 Capacity: 18,000 Capacity: 12,000
BruceStadium19032005.JPG Perth Glory v North Queensland Fury.jpg Marrara Oval grandstand.png

New Zealand[edit]

Wellington Auckland
Wellington Regional Stadium Mount Smart Stadium
Capacity: 34,500 Capacity: 30,000
Wellington regional stadium.jpg EricssonStadium00.jpg
Hamilton Christchurch
Waikato Stadium[14] Christchurch Stadium
Capacity: 25,800 Capacity: 18,000
Hamilton 03.jpg Addington Rugby Stadium.jpg

Papua New Guinea[edit]

Port Moresby
National Football Stadium
Capacity: 14,800

Qualification[edit]

It was announced on 3 August 2014 that 7 of the 8 quarter-finalists from the last World Cup would qualify automatically for the 2017 tournament; hosts Australia and New Zealand, plus England, Fiji, France, Samoa and Scotland. The USA, who were also 2013 quarter-finalists, were denied automatic qualification after a long-running internal governance dispute saw their RLIF membership temporarily suspended in 2014; later, once the matter was resolved, they were accepted into the qualification process. Papua New Guinea were initially set to be involved in the qualifying competition but were later granted automatic qualification, due to becoming co-hosts of the tournament. In addition to the eight automatic qualifiers, the remaining six spots will come from four different qualification zones; three from Europe, one from Asia/Pacific, one from Americas and one from Middle East/Africa.[15]

Tonga were the first team to qualify from the qualification stage after winning the Asian-Pacific play-off. Lebanon were the second team to qualify from the qualification stage, after winning the Middle East-African play-off. The USA were the third team to qualify, winning the Americas qualification group.

Qualifying teams
Team Captain Coach Previous
Apps
Previous best result Qualification
method
World
Ranking
 Australia Cameron Smith Australia Mal Meninga 14 Champions (10 times) Co-hosts 1
 England Sean O'Loughlin Australia Wayne Bennett 5 Runners-up (1975, 1995) Automatic 3
 Fiji Kevin Naiqama Australia Mick Potter 4 Semi-finals (2008, 2013) Automatic 7
 France Théo Fages France Aurélien Cologni 14 Runners-up (1954, 1968) Automatic 6
 Ireland Liam Finn England Mark Aston 3 Quarter-finals (2000, 2008) Europe 2 8
 Italy Mark Minichiello Italy Cameron Ciraldo 1 Group stage (2013) Europe play-off 12
 Lebanon Robbie Farah Australia Brad Fittler 1 Group stage (2000) Middle East-Africa play-off 18
 New Zealand Adam Blair New Zealand David Kidwell 14 Champions (2008) Co-hosts 2
 Papua New Guinea David Mead Papua New Guinea Michael Marum 6 Quarter-finals (2000) Co-hosts 16
 Samoa Frank Pritchard Australia Matt Parish 4 Quarter-finals (2000, 2013) Automatic 5
 Scotland Danny Brough England Steve McCormack 3 Quarter-finals (2013) Automatic 4
 Tonga Sika Manu Australia Kristian Woolf 4 Group stage (1995, 2000, 2008, 2013) Asia-Pacific play-off 11
 United States Mark Offerdahl England Brian McDermott 1 Quarter-finals (2013) Americas play-off 10
 Wales Craig Kopczak England John Kear 4 Semi-finals (1995, 2000) Europe 1 9

Draw[edit]

The draw was undertaken at the launch of the event in Auckland on 19 July 2016[16] and involved the same four group format as the 2013 tournament. The first two groups are made up of four teams whilst the other two groups feature three teams each. The top three teams in the first two groups and the winners of the two smaller groups will qualify for the quarter-finals. Group play will involve a round robin in the larger groups, and a round robin in the smaller groups with an additional inter-group game for each team so all teams will play three group games.[13]

Group A Group B Group C Group D

 Australia
 England
 France
 Lebanon

 New Zealand
 Samoa
 Scotland
 Tonga

 Ireland
 Papua New Guinea
 Wales

 Fiji
 Italy
 United States

Squads[edit]

Each team submitted a squad of twenty-four players for the tournament, the same as the 2013 tournament.

Match officials[edit]

The match officials will be headed by Tony Archer and three coaches: Steve Ganson, Russell Smith and Luke Watts.[17]

Pre-tournament matches[edit]

23 September 2017
Papua New Guinea PM's XIII Papua New Guinea 00 – 48 Australia Australia PM's XIII
8 October 2017
Malta  24 – 24  Italy
13 October 2017
Country U23s 26 – 40  Samoa
McDonalds Park, Wagga Wagga
13 October 2017
France  34 – 20  Jamaica
14 October 2017
Fiji  00 – 10  Papua New Guinea
14 October 2017
Australia  20 – 40  Papua New Guinea
14 October 2017
Fiji  00 – 18  Australia
14 October 2017
Lebanon  32 – 16  Niue
20 October 2017
Country U23s 50 – 14  Scotland
Kingsford Smith Park, Ballina
20 October 2017
Italy  06 – 16  Tonga
Callendar Park, Innisfail
20 October 2017
Combined Affiliated States 12 – 74  England

Group stage[edit]

Key to colours in pool tables
Advances to knockout stage and qualifies for the 2021 Rugby League World Cup

Group A[edit]

Team Pld W D L PF PA PD Pts
 Australia 3 3 0 0 104 10 +94 6
 England 3 2 0 1 69 34 +35 4
 Lebanon 3 1 0 2 39 81 −42 2
 France 3 0 0 3 30 117 −87 0
27 October 2017
20:00 AEDT (UTC+11)
Australia  18 – 4  England
Tries:
Gillett (23') 1
Slater (29') 1
Dugan (79') 1
Goals:
Smith 3/4
(25', 76' pen, 80')
1st: 10 – 4
2nd: 8 – 0
Report[23]
Tries:
1 (5') McGillvary
Goals:
0/1 Widdop
Melbourne Rectangular Stadium, Melbourne
Attendance: 22,724
Referee: Matt Cecchin (Australia)
Man of the Match: Billy Slater (Australia)

29 October 2017
16:00 AEDT (UTC+11)
France  18 – 29  Lebanon
Tries:
Ader (16', 52') 2
Cardace (68') 1
Goals:
Barthau 3/4
(20' pen, 53', 69')
1st: 6 – 12
2nd: 12 – 17
Report[24]
Tries:
2 (40', 80') Robinson
1 (8') Layoun
1 (63') Doueihi
1 (76') Moses
Goals:
4/5 Moses
(9', 40', 64', 77')
Field Goals:
1 (74') Moses
Canberra Stadium, Canberra
Attendance: 5,492
Referee: Gerard Sutton (Australia)
Man of the Match: Mitchell Moses (Lebanon)

3 November 2017
20:00 AEDT (UTC+11)
Australia  52 – 6  France
Tries:
Graham (12', 15', 31', 66') 4
Munster (43', 74') 2
Dugan (33') 1
Frizell (49') 1
Slater (52') 1
Holmes (78') 1
Goals:
Smith 6/8
(16', 32', 44', 51', 53', 67')
Munster 0/2
1st: 20 – 6
2nd: 32 – 0
Report[25]
Tries:
1 (24') Kheirallah
Goals:
1/1 Marginet
(25')
Canberra Stadium, Canberra
Attendance: 12,293
Referee: Robert Hicks (England)
Man of the Match: Wade Graham (Australia)

4 November 2017
20:00 AEDT (UTC+11)
England  29 – 10  Lebanon
Tries:
Watkins (9') 1
McGillvary (25') 1
Hall (28') 1
Currie (32') 1
T. Burgess (56') 1
Goals:
Widdop 4/5
(11', 26', 33', 57')
Field Goals:
Widdop (80') 1
1st: 22 – 6
2nd: 7 – 4
Report[26]
Tries:
1 (18') Kassis
1 (76') Wehbe
Goals:
1/2 Moses
(19')
Sydney Football Stadium, Sydney
Attendance: 10,237
Referee: Ben Thaler (England)
Man of the Match: Josh Hodgson (England)

11 November 2017
20:00 AEDT (UTC+11)
Australia  34 – 0  Lebanon
Tries:
Munster (9', 50') 2
Maloney (25') 1
Cordner (55') 1
Gagai (76') 1
T. Trbojevic (79') 1
Goals:
Maloney 4/4
(52', 56', 78', 80')
Smith 1/2
(26')
1st: 10 – 0
2nd: 24 – 0
Report[27]
Sydney Football Stadium, Sydney
Attendance: 21,127
Referee: James Child (England)
Man of the Match: Reagan Campbell-Gillard (Australia)

12 November 2017
18:00 AWST (UTC+8)
England  36 – 6  France
Tries:
McGillvary (42', 64') 2
Widdop (3') 1
Ratchford (6') 1
Graham (9') 1
Percival (23') 1
Bateman (29') 1
Goals:
Widdop 4/7
(4', 7', 10', 43')
1st: 26 – 6
2nd: 10 – 0
Report[28]
Tries:
1 (34') Garcia
Goals:
1/1 Albert
(35')
Perth Rectangular Stadium, Perth
Attendance: 14,744
Referee: Phil Bentham (England)
Man of the Match: Gareth Widdop (England)

Group B[edit]

Team Pld W D L PF PA PD Pts
 Tonga 3 3 0 0 110 44 +66 6
 New Zealand 3 2 0 1 134 42 +92 4
 Samoa 3 0 1 2 40 84 −44 1
 Scotland 3 0 1 2 24 138 −114 1
28 October 2017
20:10 NZDT (UTC+13)
New Zealand  38 – 8  Samoa
Tries:
Jordan Rapana (4') 1
Shaun Johnson (20') 1
Brad Takairangi (46') 1
Kodi Nikorima (52') 1
Issac Liu (55') 1
Roger Tuivasa-Sheck (68') 1
Nelson Asofa-Solomona (72') 1
Goals:
Shaun Johnson 5/7
(21', 53', 56', 69', 73')
1st: 10 – 4
2nd: 28 – 4
Report[29]
Tries:
1 (37') Ken Maumalo
1 (80') Joseph Paulo
Goals:
0/1 Peter Matautia
0/1 Tim Lafai
Mt Smart Stadium, Auckland
Attendance: 17,857
Referee: James Child (England)
Man of the Match: Joseph Tapine (New Zealand)

29 October 2017
16:15 AEDT (UTC+10)
Scotland  4 – 50  Tonga
Tries:
Danny Addy (62') 1
Goals:
Danny Brough 0/1
1st: 0 – 38
2nd: 4 – 12
Report[30]
Tries:
3 (3', 20', 40') Michael Jennings
2 (26', 73') Daniel Tupou
1 (17') Jason Taumalolo
1 (23') Sika Manu
1 (38') Peni Terepo
1 (76') Ata Hingano
Goals:
6/7 Sio Siua Taukeiaho
(4', 19', 21', 24', 75', 78')
1/2 Ata Hingano
(40')
Barlow Park, Cairns
Attendance: 9,216
Referee: Phil Bentham (England)
Man of the Match: Jason Taumalolo (Tonga)

4 November 2017
17:00 NZDT (UTC+13)
New Zealand  74 – 6  Scotland
Tries:
Te Maire Martin (32', 52', 76') 3
Pita Hiku (39', 58', 69') 3
Jason Nightingale (13', 23') 2
Kenny Bromwich (9') 1
Joseph Tapine (16') 1
Russell Packer (43') 1
Dean Whare (55') 1
Shaun Johnson (61') 1
Elijah Taylor (79') 1
Goals:
Shaun Johnson 9/14
(11', 33', 44', 53', 56', 60', 63', 70', 80')
1st: 28 – 0
2nd: 46 – 6
Report[31]
Tries:
1 (72') Oscar Thomas
Goals:
1/1 Danny Addy
(73')
Christchurch Stadium, Christchurch
Attendance: 12,130
Referee: Henry Perenara (New Zealand)
Man of the Match: Roger Tuivasa-Sheck (New Zealand)

4 November 2017
19:30 NZDT (UTC+13)
Samoa  18 – 32  Tonga
Tries:
Jazz Tevaga (17') 1
Ben Roberts (65') 1
Tim Lafai (73') 1
Goals:
Tim Lafai 3/3
(18', 66', 74')
1st: 6 – 14
2nd: 12 – 18
Report[32]
Tries:
2 (10', 29') Michael Jennings
1 (52') Peni Terepo
1 (60') Ben Murdoch-Masila
1 (77') Manu Ma'u
Goals:
4/4 Sio Siua Taukeiaho
(11', 28' pen, 30', 79')
2/2 Ata Hingano
(53', 61')
Waikato Stadium, Hamilton
Attendance: 18,156
Referee: Ben Cummins (Australia)
Man of the Match: Andrew Fifita (Tonga)

11 November 2017
17:00 NZDT (UTC+13)
New Zealand  22 – 28  Tonga
Tries:
Roger Tuivasa-Sheck (39', 72') 2
Dallin Watene-Zelezniak (21') 1
Jordan Rapana (28') 1
Goals:
Shaun Johnson 3/4
(30', 40', 73')
1st: 16 – 2
2nd: 6 – 26
Report[33]
Tries:
3 (48', 59', 77') David Fusitu'a
1 (62') Tuimoala Lolohea
1 (65') William Hopoate
Goals:
3/4 Sio Siua Taukeiaho
(7' pen, 63'), 66')
1/2 Tuimoala Lolohea
(60')
Waikato Stadium, Hamilton
Attendance: 24,041
Referee: Gerard Sutton (Australia)
Man of the Match: Tuimoala Lolohea (Tonga)

11 November 2017
17:00 AEDT (UTC+10)
Samoa  14 – 14  Scotland
Tries:
Junior Paulo (12') 1
Matthew Wright (49') 1
Young Tonumaipea (66') 1
Goals:
Matthew Wright 1/3
(13')
1st: 6 – 14
2nd: 8 – 0
Report[34]
Tries:
1 (5') Lewis Tierney
1 (28') Frankie Mariano
Goals:
3/4 Danny Addy
(6', 18' pen, 30')
Barlow Park, Cairns
Attendance: 4,309
Referee: Ashley Klein (Australia)
Man of the Match: Danny Addy (Scotland)

Group C[edit]

Team Pld W D L PF PA PD Pts
 Papua New Guinea 3 3 0 0 128 12 +116 6
 Ireland 3 2 0 1 76 32 +44 4
 Wales 3 0 0 3 18 156 −138 0
28 October 2017
15:00 AEDT (UTC+10)
Papua New Guinea  50 – 6  Wales
Tries:
David Mead (5', 10', 60') 3
Rhyse Martin (43', 53') 2
Nene Macdonald (23') 1
Kato Ottio (34') 1
Wellington Albert (38') 1
Justin Olam (56') 1
Paul Aiton (71') 1
Goals:
Rhyse Martin 5/8
(24', 36', 39', 44', 72')
Ase Boas 0/2
1st: 26 – 0
2nd: 24 – 6
Report[35]
Tries:
1 (80') Regan Grace
Goals:
1/1 Courtney Davies
(80')
National Football Stadium, Port Moresby
Attendance: 14,800
Referee: Ben Cummins (Australia)
Man of the Match: David Mead (Papua New Guinea)

5 November 2017
16:00 AEDT (UTC+10)
Papua New Guinea  14 – 6  Ireland
Tries:
Garry Lo (16') 1
Nene Macdonald (26') 1
Watson Boas (78') 1
Goals:
Ase Boas 1/1
(79')
Rhyse Martin 0/2
1st: 8 – 6
2nd: 6 – 0
Report[36]
Tries:
1 (5') Michael McIlorum
Goals:
1/1 Liam Finn
(6')
National Football Stadium, Port Moresby
Attendance: 14,800
Referee: Matt Cecchin (Australia)
Man of the Match: Garry Lo (Papua New Guinea)

12 November 2017
15:30 AWST (UTC+8)
Wales  6 – 34  Ireland
Tries:
Ben Morris (57') 1
Goals:
Courtney Davies 1/1
(59')
1st: 0 – 22
2nd: 6 – 12
Report[37]
Tries:
2 (34', 66') Oliver Roberts
1 (8') Api Pewhairangi
1 (34') Joe Philbin
1 (39') Liam Finn
1 (74') Liam Kay
Goals:
5/6 Liam Finn
(9', 32', 35', 67', 76')
Perth Rectangular Stadium, Perth
Attendance: 14,744
Referee: Ben Thaler (England)
Man of the Match: Oliver Roberts (Ireland)

Group D[edit]

Team Pld W D L PF PA PD Pts
 Fiji 3 3 0 0 168 28 +140 6
 Italy 3 1 0 2 68 74 −6 2
 United States 3 0 0 3 12 168 −156 0
Saturday, 28 October
7:40pm (AEST)
Fiji  58 – 12  United States
Tries:
Taane Milne (3', 11') 2
Kevin Naiqama (7', 30') 2
Suliasi Vunivalu (35', 64') 2
Akuila Uate (14') 1
Kane Evans (17') 1
Jarryd Hayne (46') 1
Viliame Kikau (60') 1
Henry Raiwalui (66') 1
Goals:
Apisai Koroisau 5/8
(8', 13', 18', 31', 47')
Taane Milne 2/3
(61', 68')
1st: 36 – 6
2nd: 22 – 6
Report[38]
Tries:
1 (21') Matt Shipway
1 (72') Junior Vaivai
Goals:
2/2 Bureta Fariamo
(22', 74')
Townsville Stadium, Townsville
Attendance: 5,103
Referee: New Zealand Henry Perenara
Man of the Match: Fiji Kevin Naiqama

Sunday, 5 November
4:00pm (AEST)
Italy  46 – 0  United States
Tries:
Joey Tramontana (8', 37') 2
James Tedesco (14', 43') 2
Josh Mantellato (18') 1
Ryan Ghietti (25') 1
Paul Vaughan (59') 1
Mason Cerruto (73') 1
Goals:
Josh Mantellato 7/8
(9', 16', 26', 38', 45', 60', 74')
1st: 28 – 0
2nd: 18 – 0
Report[39]
Townsville Stadium, Townsville
Attendance: 7,732
Referee: Australia Ashley Klein
Man of the Match: Italy Joey Tramontana

Friday, 10 November
7:40pm (AEDT)
Fiji  38 – 10  Italy
Tries:
Suliasi Vunivalu (60', 63', 68') 3
Kevin Naiqama (28') 1
Henry Raiwalui (40') 1
Brayden Wiliame (54') 1
Marcelo Montoya (75') 1
Goals:
Apisai Koroisau 3/4
(29', 40', 61')
Taane Milne 2/3
(64', 69')
Sin Bins:
Jarryd Hayne (34')
1st: 12 – 4
2nd: 26 – 6
Report[40]
Tries:
1 (20') Josh Mantellato
1 (43') Nathan Milone
Goals:
1/2 Josh Mantellato
(44')
Sin Bins:
(12') Jayden Walker
(34') Joey Tramontana
Canberra Stadium, Canberra
Attendance: 6,733
Referee: England Robert Hicks
Man of the Match: Fiji Apisai Koroisau

Inter-group matches[edit]


29 October 2017
14:00 AEDT (UTC+10)
Ireland  36 – 12  Italy
Tries:
Liam Kay (3', 30') 2
George King (10') 1
Kyle Amor (55') 1
Michael Morgan (60') 1
Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook (79') 1
Goals:
Liam Finn 6/7
(4', 11', 18' pen, 31', 56', 61')
1st: 20 – 6
2nd: 16 – 6
Report[41]
Tries:
1 (38') Justin Castellaro
1 (47') Nathan Milone
Goals:
2/2 Josh Mantellato
(39', 48')
Barlow Park, Cairns
Attendance: 9,216
Referee: Grant Atkins (Australia)
Man of the Match: Liam Finn (Ireland)

5 November 2017
18:30 AEDT (UTC+10)
Fiji  72 – 6  Wales
Tries:
Suliasi Vunivalu (14', 51', 61') 3
Viliame Kikau (22', 40') 2
Taane Milne (31', 56') 2
Eloni Vunakece (6') 1
Henry Raiwalui (16') 1
Salesi Fainga'a (27') 1
Marcelo Montoya (33') 1
Jarryd Hayne (42') 1
Joe Lovodua (65') 1
Ben Nakubuwai (70') 1
Goals:
Apisai Koroisau 4/7
(7', 17', 23', 28')
Taane Milne 3/5
(40', 43', 52')
Suliasi Vunivalu 1/2
(66')
1st: 42 – 6
2nd: 30 – 0
Report[42]
Tries:
1 (11') Morgan Knowles
Goals:
1/1 Courtney Davies
(12')
Townsville Stadium, Townsville
Attendance: 7,732
Referee: Chris Kendall (England)
Man of the Match: Akuila Uate (Fiji)

12 November 2017
15:00 AEDT (UTC+10)
Papua New Guinea  64 – 0  United States
Tries:
Justin Olam (12', 66', 75') 3
Lachlan Lam (8', 16') 2
James Segeyaro (14') 1
Rod Griffin (25') 1
Stargroth Amean (39') 1
David Mead (42') 1
Watson Boas (60') 1
Nene Macdonald (63') 1
Goals:
Rhyse Martin 10/11
(10', 15', 18', 26', 40', 44', 62', 65', 68', 77')
1st: 34 – 0
2nd: 30 – 0
Report[43]
National Football Stadium, Port Moresby
Attendance: 14,800
Referee: Adam Gee (Australia)
Man of the Match: Lachlan Lam (Papua New Guinea)

Knockout stage[edit]

Three teams from each of Groups A and B and one team from each of Groups C and D advanced to the quarter-finals. All quarter-finalists automatically qualified for the 2021 Rugby League World Cup.[44] The quarter-final fixture were finalised at the conclusion of the pool stages, to ensure that Australia played in Darwin on 17 November and New Zealand in Wellington on 18 November.[45]

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
17 November – Darwin
 
 
 Australia46
 
24 November – Brisbane
 
 Samoa0
 
 Australia54
 
18 November – Wellington
 
 Fiji6
 
 New Zealand2
 
2 December – Brisbane
 
 Fiji4
 
 Australia6
 
18 November – Christchurch
 
 England0
 
 Tonga24
 
25 November – Auckland
 
 Lebanon22
 
 Tonga18
 
19 November – Melbourne
 
 England20
 
 England36
 
 
 Papua New Guinea6
 

Quarter-finals[edit]

Australia vs Samoa[edit]

17 November 2017
19:00 ACST (UTC+9:30)
Australia  46 – 0  Samoa
Tries:
Holmes (9', 17', 51', 57', 74') 5
Morgan (31', 36') 2
Slater (24') 1
Goals:
Smith 7/8
(10', 19', 26', 33', 38', 53', 58')
1st: 30 – 0
2nd: 16 – 0
Darwin Stadium, Darwin
Attendance: 13,473
Referee: Phil Bentham (England)
Man of the Match: Valentine Holmes (Australia)

Tonga vs Lebanon[edit]

18 November 2017
17:00 NZDT (UTC+13)
Tonga  24 – 22  Lebanon
Tries:
Fusitu'a (19', 33') 2
Lolohea (4') 1
Hopoate (23') 1
Goals:
Hingano 4/5
(5', 24', 34', 53' pen)
1st: 22 – 16
2nd: 2 – 6
Tries:
2 (40', 69') Miski
1 (9') Doueihi
1 (30') Elias
Goals:
3/4 Moses
(10', 31', 70')
Christchurch Stadium, Christchurch
Attendance: 8,309
Referee: Gerard Sutton (Australia)
Man of the Match: Mitchell Moses (Lebanon)

New Zealand vs Fiji[edit]

18 November 2017
19:30 NZDT (UTC+13)
New Zealand  2 – 4  Fiji
Goals:
Johnson 1/1
(45' pen)
1st: 0 – 2
2nd: 2 – 2
Goals:
1/1 Koroisau
(15' pen)
1/1 Milne
(62' pen)
Wellington Regional Stadium, Wellington
Attendance: 12,713
Referee: Matt Cecchin (Australia)
Man of the Match: Kevin Naiqama (Fiji)

England vs Papua New Guinea[edit]

19 November 2017
16:00 AEDT (UTC+11)
England  36 – 6  Papua New Guinea
Tries:
McGillvary (13', 20') 2
Watkins (68', 72') 2
Walmsley (33') 1
Currie (56') 1
Hall (79') 1
Goals:
Widdop 4/7
(34', 57', 69', 80')
1st: 14 – 0
2nd: 22 – 6
Tries:
1 (60') Lo
Goals:
1/1 Martin
(61')
Melbourne Rectangular Stadium, Melbourne
Attendance: 10,563
Referee: James Child (England)
Man of the Match: Jermaine McGillvary (England)

Semi-finals[edit]

Australia vs Fiji[edit]

24 November 2017
19:00 AEST (UTC+10)
Australia  54 – 6  Fiji
Tries:
Holmes (18', 24', 42', 51', 65', 75') 6
Gagai (31', 69') 2
Slater (14', 48') 2
Goals:
Smith 7/10
(15', 19', 33', 43', 49', 53', 67')
1st: 22 – 2
2nd: 32 – 4
Tries:
1 (59') Vunivalu
Goals:
1/2 Koroisau
(7' pen)
Brisbane Stadium, Brisbane
Attendance: 22,073
Referee: Gerard Sutton (Australia)
Man of the Match: Cameron Smith (Australia)

Tonga vs England[edit]

25 November 2017
18:00 NZDT (UTC+13)
Tonga  18 – 20  England
Tries:
Pangai Junior (73') 1
Havili (76') 1
Lolohea (77') 1
Goals:
Taukeiaho 3/3
(73', 76, 77')
1st: 0 – 12
2nd: 18 – 8
Tries:
1 (11') McGillvary
1 (16') Widdop
1 (68') Bateman
Goals:
4/4 Widdop
(12, 17, 50 pen, 69)
Mt Smart Stadium, Auckland
Attendance: 30,003
Referee: Matt Cecchin (Australia)
Man of the Match: Gareth Widdop (England)

Final: Australia vs England[edit]

2 December 2017
19:00 AEST (UTC+10)
Australia  6 – 0  England
Tries:
Cordner (15')
Goals:
Smith 1/1
(16')
1st: 6 – 0
2nd: 0 – 0
Brisbane Stadium, Brisbane
Attendance: 40,033
Referee: Gerard Sutton (Australia)
Man of the Match: Boyd Cordner (Australia)

Statistics[edit]

Top try scorers[edit]

12 tries
9 tries
7 tries
5 tries
4 tries
3 tries
2 tries
1 try

Top point scorers[edit]

Player Team App. Total Details
T G FG
Cameron Smith  Australia 6 50 0 25 0
Valentine Holmes  Australia 6 48 12 0 0
Shaun Johnson  New Zealand 4 44 2 18 0
Gareth Widdop  England 6 41 2 16 1
Rhyse Martin  Papua New Guinea 4 40 2 16 0
Suliasi Vunivalu  Fiji 5 38 9 1 0
Taane Milne  Fiji 5 32 4 8 0
Sio Siua Taukeiaho  Tonga 4 32 0 16 0
Liam Finn  Ireland 3 28 1 12 0
Apisai Koroisau  Fiji 5 28 0 14 0
Jermaine McGillvary  England 6 28 7 0 0
Josh Mantellato  Italy 3 28 2 10 0

Tournament ranking[edit]

Pos Grp Team Pld W D L PF PA PD Pts Final result
1 A  Australia (H) 6 6 0 0 210 16 +194 12 Champions
2 A  England 6 4 0 2 125 64 +61 8 Runners-up
3 D  Fiji 5 4 0 1 178 84 +94 8 Eliminated in
semi-finals
4 B  Tonga 5 4 0 1 152 86 +66 8
5 C  Papua New Guinea (H) 4 3 0 1 134 48 +86 6 Eliminated in
quarter-finals
6 B  New Zealand (H) 4 2 0 2 136 46 +90 4
7 A  Lebanon 4 1 0 3 61 105 −44 2
8 B  Samoa 4 0 1 3 40 130 −90 1
9 C  Ireland 3 2 0 1 76 32 +44 4 Eliminated in
group stage
10 D  Italy 3 2 0 1 68 74 −6 4
11 B  Scotland 3 0 1 2 24 138 −114 1
12 A  France 3 0 0 3 30 117 −87 0
13 C  Wales 3 0 0 3 18 156 −138 0
14 D  United States 3 0 0 3 12 168 −156 0
Updated to match(es) played on 30 July 2021. Source: World Cup 2017
(H) Host

Attendances[edit]

Date Match Venue Location Attendance
27 October 2017  Australia  England Melbourne Rectangular Stadium Australia Melbourne 22,724
28 October 2017  Papua New Guinea  Wales National Football Stadium Papua New Guinea Port Moresby 14,800
28 October 2017  New Zealand  Samoa Mount Smart Stadium New Zealand Auckland 17,857
28 October 2017  Fiji  United States Townsville Stadium Australia Townsville 5,103
29 October 2017  Ireland  Italy Barlow Park Australia Cairns 9,216
 Scotland  Tonga
29 October 2017  France  Lebanon Canberra Stadium Australia Canberra 5,492
3 November 2017  Australia  France Canberra Stadium Australia Canberra 12,293
4 November 2017  New Zealand  Scotland Christchurch Stadium New Zealand Christchurch 12,130
4 November 2017  Samoa  Tonga Waikato Stadium New Zealand Hamilton 18,156
4 November 2017  England  Lebanon Sydney Football Stadium Australia Sydney 10,237
5 November 2017  Papua New Guinea  Ireland National Football Stadium Papua New Guinea Port Moresby 14,800
5 November 2017  Italy  United States Townsville Stadium Australia Townsville 7,732
 Fiji  Wales
10 November 2017  Fiji  Italy Canberra Stadium Australia Canberra 6,733
11 November 2017  New Zealand  Tonga Waikato Stadium New Zealand Hamilton 24,041
11 November 2017  Samoa  Scotland Barlow Park Australia Cairns 4,309
11 November 2017  Australia  Lebanon Sydney Football Stadium Australia Sydney 21,127
12 November 2017  Papua New Guinea  United States National Football Stadium Papua New Guinea Port Moresby 14,800
12 November 2017  Wales  Ireland Perth Rectangular Stadium Australia Perth 14,744
 England  France
17 November 2017  Australia  Samoa Darwin Stadium Australia Darwin 13,473
18 November 2017  Tonga  Lebanon Christchurch Stadium New Zealand Christchurch 8,309
18 November 2017  New Zealand  Fiji Wellington Regional Stadium New Zealand Wellington 12,713
19 November 2017  England  Papua New Guinea Melbourne Rectangular Stadium Australia Melbourne 10,563
24 November 2017  Australia  Fiji Brisbane Stadium Australia Brisbane 22,073
25 November 2017  Tonga  England Mount Smart Stadium New Zealand Auckland 30,003
2 December 2017  Australia  England Brisbane Stadium Australia Brisbane 40,033

Criticism and controversy[edit]

The lack of games in New South Wales, the heartland of rugby league in Australia, drew some criticism. Only one of the 13 confirmed tournament venues was in New South Wales (Sydney Football Stadium) and it is only hosting two group-stage fixtures, both featuring Lebanon. This was due to the refusal of the New South Wales Government to bid for hosting rights. Despite the so-called 'Sydney Cup snub', the RLWC organisers backed their decision and the venues they were using.[46]

In the buildup to the Samoa vs. Tonga game in Hamilton, controversy occurred after fans from both countries were caught having brawls in South Auckland. At least 6 people were arrested from the brawls resulting in a massive security increase for the game. Both teams, celebrities, and police urged fans to calm down.[47] Following the results of the controversial incident, a Tongan Advisory Council member lashed out at organisers, saying that this tournament is poorly organised compared to the 2011 Rugby World Cup, mentioning that Rugby World Cup organisers engaged with community groups 18 months beforehand, whereas this tournament was "scrambled around".[48]

After Scotland's 68-point thrashing to New Zealand in Christchurch, captain Danny Brough, Sam Brooks, and Jonathan Walker were sent home for violating code of conduct after being all deemed too 'intoxicated' for their team's flight to Cairns for Scotland's next game against Samoa. Italian players James Tedesco and Shannon Wakeman were under investigation by the World Cup integrity unit for a brawl at a Cairns nightclub.[49]

There was criticism on how Samoa and Lebanon qualified for the Quarter-Finals of the World Cup, while Ireland missed out. Samoa played in Pool B where three sides qualify for the finals and only one misses out. Samoa lost to both New Zealand and Tonga, and drew with Scotland. Lebanon was in Pool A which had the same format as Pool B. Lebanon lost to both Australia and England and beat France. Ireland played in Pool C where there are only three teams and the winner is the only team that goes to the finals. Ireland beat both Italy and Wales and only just lost to Papua New Guinea and didn't qualify for the finals. Irish captain Liam Finn, said "I don't know if it's unfair, it probably makes sense, but to me: try and explain that to someone who's not rugby league," , "That's how we judge it. I tell someone 'we didn't go through, we won two games; someone got through by drawing one," and "That's where we should be focused: how do we attract new fans when that's how you're explaining the game to them?" in the press conference after his team's victory over Wales.[50]

Broadcasting[edit]

Seven Network was the Australian and worldwide host broadcaster, winning the rights for the event in July 2016, beating the likes of Foxtel and Optus.[51]

Country or region Broadcaster Broadcasting Ref.
 Australia Seven Network All 28 matches live (via Channel 7, 7mate, or streamed from the 7Live app) [52]
 Austria
 Germany
  Switzerland
ProSieben Maxx
ran.de
6 matches live (ProSieben Maxx)
All 28 matches live streamed (ran.de)
[53]
 Germany Sportdeutschland.TV All 28 matches live streamed [53]
 Fiji Fiji One All 28 matches live [54]
 France beIN Sports All 28 matches live [55]
Hong Kong Hong Kong PCCW All 28 matches live [56]
 Ireland eir Sports All 28 matches live [57]
 Japan DAZN All 28 matches live [56]
Malaysia Malaysia Astro All 28 matches live [56]
Middle East OSN Sports All 28 matches live [56]
 New Zealand Sky Sport All 28 matches live [58]
 Papua New Guinea EM TV All 28 matches live [59]
 United Kingdom BBC Sport All England matches live; Ireland, Wales and Scotland matches delayed; highlights from all 28 matches [60]
Premier Sports 27 matches Live (Delayed coverage of NZ vs Tonga due to football match) [61]
 United States Fox Sports All USA matches and knockout matches live [56]

References[edit]

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  3. ^ "Australia, NZ to host 2017 World Cup". nrl.com. Retrieved 27 September 2015.
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  5. ^ Australia-NZ Rugby League World Cup bid progresses Archived 20 October 2013 at the Wayback Machine 3News, 21 October 2013
  6. ^ "South Africa's shock bid to host World Cup". dailytelegraph.com.au. 22 October 2013. Retrieved 6 July 2015.
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  8. ^ "Michael Brown resignation". NRL. 22 July 2016. Retrieved 24 July 2016.
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  28. ^ "Rugby League World Cup 2021".
  29. ^ Rosser, Corey (28 October 2017). "Kiwis beat Samoa with second-half blitz". NRL.com.
  30. ^ Webeck, Tony (29 October 2017). "Taumalolo runs riot in big Tonga win". NRL.com.
  31. ^ Richards, Eden (4 November 2017). "Martin stars as Kiwis smash Scotland". NRL.com.
  32. ^ Rosser, Corey (4 November 2017). "Tonga book maiden World Cup finals spot". NRL.com.
  33. ^ "Rugby League World Cup 2021".
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  35. ^ Newton, Alicia (28 October 2017). "Mead stars as PNG thrash Wales". NRL.com.
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  38. ^ Morris, Dylan (28 October 2017). "Fiji thrash USA in Townsville". NRL.com.
  39. ^ Morris, Dylan (5 November 2017). "Italy shuts out USA in Townsville". NRL.com.
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  44. ^ "Statement from the RLIF Board meeting – March 28th 2017". Rlif.com. 8 November 2017. Retrieved 17 November 2017.
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  53. ^ a b "ran Rugby". 10 October 2017.
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External links[edit]