2017 Women's Cricket World Cup

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2017 Women's Cricket World Cup
2017 Women's Cricket World Cup logo.png
ICC Women's World Cup 2017, England & Wales
Dates 24 June–23 July
Administrator(s) International Cricket Council
Cricket format One-Day International
Tournament format(s) Round-robin and Knockout
Host(s) England England
Wales Wales[nb 1]
Champions  England (4th title)
Runners-up  India
Participants 8
Matches played 31
Player of the series England Tammy Beaumont
Most runs England Tammy Beaumont (410)
Most wickets South Africa Dane van Niekerk (15)
Official website Official site
2013
2021

The 2017 Women's Cricket World Cup was an international women's cricket tournament that took place in England from 24 June to 23 July 2017.[1] It was the eleventh edition of the Women's Cricket World Cup, and the third to be held in England (after the 1973 and 1993 tournaments). The 2017 World Cup was the first in which all participating players were fully professional.[2] Eight teams qualified to participate in the tournament. England won the final against India at Lord's on 23 July by 9 runs.[3]

Qualification[edit]

The 2014–16 ICC Women's Championship, featuring the top eight ranked teams in women's cricket, was the first phase of qualifying for the World Cup, with the top four teams qualifying automatically. The remaining four places were decided at the 2017 World Cup Qualifier, a ten-team event that was held in Sri Lanka in February 2017. This featured the bottom four teams from the ICC Women's Championship and six other teams.[4]

Team Mode of qualification
 Australia Women's Championship
 England Women's Championship
 New Zealand Women's Championship
 West Indies Women's Championship
 India World Cup Qualifier
 South Africa World Cup Qualifier
 Sri Lanka World Cup Qualifier
 Pakistan World Cup Qualifier

Venues[edit]

On 8 February 2016, the International Cricket Council (ICC) announced the five venues for the 2017 Women's World Cup. Lord's hosted the final, and other matches were played at the home grounds of Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Somerset and Gloucestershire.[5][6]

London Derby Bristol Leicester Taunton
Lord's County Ground Bristol County Ground Grace Road County Ground
Capacity: 28,000 Capacity: 9,500 Capacity: 17,500 Capacity: 12,000 Capacity: 12,500
Nat West media centre cropped.jpg Photo from Racecourse end.JPG Bristol County Ground.jpg Grace Road Cricket Ground - 1 - geograph-387387jpg.jpg County ground taunton churches.jpg

Squads[edit]

The captains of each team were announced on 21 April 2017, with the full squads named shortly after.[7]

Match officials[edit]

The ICC announced a panel of thirteen umpires and three match referees to officiate the tournament, including four female umpires, the highest number yet for an ICC global event.[8] The four female umpires were drawn from the ICC's International Umpires Development Panel and their male colleagues from the International Umpires Panel. Richie Richardson is a member of the Elite Match Referees Panel while Steve Bernard and David Jukes are on the Regional Match Referees Panel. Sue Redfern became the first woman to have played in a Women's Cricket World Cup and then stand in a tournament as an umpire.[9]

Group stage[edit]

On 8 February 2016, it was announced that in the Group Stage, eight sides will participate in a single-league format with each side playing the other once. This format was last used in the 2005 tournament. The top four sides following the conclusion of the league matches will progress to the semi-finals with the winners meeting at Lord's on 23 July. Therefore, a total of 31 matches will be played during the 28-day tournament.[10] The full fixtures for the tournament were announced by the ICC on 8 March 2017, to coincide with International Women's Day.[11] Ahead of the group stage fixtures there were eight practice matches, played between 19 and 22 June 2017.[12]

Teams tied on equal points in the group stage of the tournament were decided by number of wins, followed by net run rate.[13] If both of those were still the same, then the head-to-head match between the two sides was used to determine who progresses to the semi-finals.[13]


Team
Pld W L NR Pts NRR
 England 7 6 1 0 12 +1.295
 Australia 7 6 1 0 12 +1.004
 India 7 5 2 0 10 +0.669
 South Africa 7 4 2 1 9 +1.183
 New Zealand 7 3 3 1 7 +0.309
 West Indies 7 2 5 0 4 –1.522
 Sri Lanka 7 1 6 0 2 –1.099
 Pakistan 7 0 7 0 0 –1.930
Last updated: 15 July 2017

     Qualified to Semi-finals

Round 1[edit]

24 June 2017
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
188/9 (50 overs)
v
 New Zealand
189/1 (37.4 overs)
Chamari Atapattu 53 (66)
Holly Huddleston 5/34 (10 overs)
Suzie Bates 106* (109)
Chandima Gunaratne 1/20 (5 overs)
New Zealand Women won by 9 wickets
Bristol County Ground, Bristol
Umpires: Anil Chaudhary (Ind) and Claire Polosak (Aus)
Player of the match: Holly Huddleston (NZ)
  • New Zealand Women won the toss and elected to field.
  • Points: New Zealand Women 2, Sri Lanka Women 0.

24 June 2017
Scorecard
India 
281/3 (50 overs)
v
 England
246 (47.3 overs)
Smriti Mandhana 90 (72)
Heather Knight 2/41 (7 overs)
Fran Wilson 81 (75)
Deepti Sharma 3/47 (8.3 overs)
India Women won by 35 runs
County Ground, Derby
Umpires: Ahsan Raza (Pak) and Gregory Brathwaite (WI)
Player of the match: Smriti Mandhana (Ind)
  • England Women won the toss and elected to field.
  • Mithali Raj (Ind) became the first woman to score seven successive half-centuries in WODIs.[14]
  • Points: India Women 2, England Women 0.

25 June 2017
Scorecard
Pakistan 
206/8 (50 overs)
v
 South Africa
207/7 (49 overs)
Nahida Khan 79 (101)
Moseline Daniels 2/21 (10 overs)
Lizelle Lee 60 (79)
Sadia Yousuf 2/30 (10 overs)
South Africa Women won by 3 wickets
Grace Road, Leicester
Umpires: Langton Rusere (Zim) and Sharfuddoula (Ban)
Player of the match: Shabnim Ismail (SA)
  • South Africa Women won the toss and elected to field.
  • Mignon du Preez became the first woman for South Africa to play in 100 WODIs.[15]
  • Points: South Africa Women 2, Pakistan Women 0.

26 June 2017
Scorecard
West Indies 
204 (47.5 overs)
v
 Australia
205/2 (38.1 overs)
Hayley Matthews 46 (63)
Ellyse Perry 3/47 (9 overs)
Nicole Bolton 107* (116)
Stafanie Taylor 2/33 (8.1 overs)
Australia Women won by 8 wickets
County Ground, Taunton
Umpires: Kathy Cross (NZ) and Adrian Holdstock (SA)
Player of the match: Nicole Bolton (Aus)

Round 2[edit]

27 June 2017
Scorecard
England 
377/7 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
107/3 (29.2 overs)
Natalie Sciver 137 (92)
Asmavia Iqbal 3/62 (10 overs)
Ayesha Zafar 56* (77)
Katherine Brunt 2/21 (6 overs)
England Women won by 107 runs (D/L method)
Grace Road, Leicester
Umpires: Chris Brown (NZ) and Jacqueline Williams (WI)
Player of the match: Natalie Sciver (Eng)
  • Pakistan Women won the toss and elected to field.
  • Rain during Pakistan Women's innings prevented any further play.
  • Natalie Sciver and Heather Knight (Eng) both scored their maiden centuries in a WODI.[17]
  • This was England Women's highest total in a World Cup match and their second-highest total in all WODIs.[17]
  • Points: England Women 2, Pakistan Women 0.

28 June 2017
Scorecard
v
Match abandoned
County Ground, Derby
Umpires: Langton Rusere (Zim) and Paul Wilson (Aus)
  • No toss.
  • No play was possible due to rain.
  • Points: New Zealand Women 1, South Africa Women 1.

29 June 2017
Scorecard
West Indies 
183/8 (50 overs)
v
 India
186/3 (42.3 overs)
Hayley Matthews 43 (57)
Poonam Yadav 2/19 (10 overs)
Smriti Mandhana 106* (108)
Shamilia Connell 1/23 (4 overs)
India Women won by 7 wickets
County Ground, Taunton
Umpires: Shaun George (SA) and Claire Polosak (Aus)
Player of the match: Smriti Mandhana (Ind)
  • India Women won the toss and elected to field.
  • Deandra Dottin and Stafanie Taylor (WI) both played in their 100th WODI.[18]
  • Points: India Women 2, West Indies Women 0.

29 June 2017
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
257/9 (50 overs)
v
 Australia
262/2 (43.5 overs)
Chamari Atapattu 178* (143)
Nicole Bolton 2/18 (3 overs)
Meg Lanning 152* (135)
Sripali Weerakkody 1/39 (8 overs)
Australia Women won by 8 wickets
Bristol County Ground, Bristol
Umpires: Anil Chaudhary (Ind) and Sue Redfern (Eng)
Player of the match: Chamari Atapattu (SL)
  • Australia Women won the toss and elected to field.
  • Belinda Vakarewa (Aus) made her WODI debut.
  • Chamari Atapattu (SL) scored the third-highest total in a WODI and the second-highest total in a Women's World Cup match.[19]
  • Chamari Atapattu also scored the highest percentage of runs in a completed innings in a WODI (69.26%) and the most runs in boundaries in a WODI (124).[19]
  • Points: Australia Women 2, Sri Lanka Women 0.

Round 3[edit]

2 July 2017
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
204/8 (50 overs)
v
 England
206/3 (30.2 overs)
Hasini Perera 46 (63)
Laura Marsh 4/45 (10 overs)
Heather Knight 82 (76)
Ama Kanchana 2/38 (6 overs)
England Women won by 7 wickets
County Ground, Taunton
Umpires: Kathy Cross (NZ) and Adrian Holdstock (SA)
Player of the match: Laura Marsh (Eng)
  • Sri Lanka Women won the toss and elected to bat.
  • Points: England Women 2, Sri Lanka Women 0.

2 July 2017
Scorecard
New Zealand 
219/9 (50 overs)
v
 Australia
220/5 (48.4 overs)
Katie Perkins 52 (59)
Jess Jonassen 3/33 (10 overs)
Ellyse Perry 71 (91)
Anna Peterson 2/27 (6.4 overs)
Australia Women won by 5 wickets
Bristol County Ground, Bristol
Umpires: Ahsan Raza (Pak) and Jacqueline Williams (WI)
Player of the match: Ellyse Perry (Aus)
  • New Zealand Women won the toss and elected to bat.
  • Suzie Bates (NZ) played her 100th WODI.[20]
  • Points: Australia Women 2, New Zealand Women 0.

2 July 2017
Scorecard
India 
169/9 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
74 (38.1 overs)
Poonam Raut 47 (72)
Nashra Sandhu 4/26 (10 overs)
Sana Mir 29 (73)
Ekta Bisht 5/18 (10 overs)
India Women won by 95 runs
County Ground, Derby
Umpires: Gregory Brathwaite (WI) and Shaun George (SA)
Player of the match: Ekta Bisht (Ind)
  • India Women won the toss and elected to bat.
  • Points: India Women 2, Pakistan Women 0.

2 July 2017
Scorecard
West Indies 
48 (25.2 overs)
v
 South Africa
51/0 (6.2 overs)
Chedean Nation 26 (53)
Dane van Niekerk 4/0 (3.2 overs)
Lizelle Lee 29* (16)
South Africa Women won by 10 wickets
Grace Road, Leicester
Umpires: Sue Redfern (Eng) and Sharfuddoula (Ban)
Player of the match: Marizanne Kapp (SA)
  • South Africa Women won the toss and elected to field.
  • Reniece Boyce and Qiana Joseph (WI) both made their WODI debuts.
  • This was the second-lowest total by the West Indies in a WODI.[21]
  • Dane van Niekerk (SA) became the first bowler in international cricket to take four wickets without conceding a run.[21]
  • Points: South Africa Women 2, West Indies Women 0.

Round 4[edit]

5 July 2017
Scorecard
England 
373/5 (50 overs)
v
 South Africa
305/9 (50 overs)
Tammy Beaumont 148 (145)
Marizanne Kapp 3/77 (10 overs)
Lizelle Lee 72 (77)
Danielle Hazell 3/70 (10 overs)
England Women won by 68 runs
Bristol County Ground, Bristol
Umpires: Kathy Cross (NZ) and Paul Wilson (Aus)
Player of the match: Sarah Taylor (Eng)
  • England Women won the toss and elected to bat.
  • Tammy Beaumont and Sarah Taylor (Eng) made the highest partnership for any wicket in a Women's Cricket World Cup match (275).[22]
  • South Africa Women became the first side to make more than 300 runs batting second in a WODI.[23]
  • Points: England Women 2, South Africa Women 0.

5 July 2017
Scorecard
India 
232/8 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
216/7 (50 overs)
Deepti Sharma 78 (110)
Sripali Weerakkody 3/28 (9 overs)
Dilani Manodara 61 (75)
Poonam Yadav 2/23 (10 overs)
India Women won by 16 runs
County Ground, Derby
Umpires: Chris Brown (NZ) and Langton Rusere (Zim)
Player of the match: Deepti Sharma (Ind)
  • India Women won the toss and elected to bat.
  • Points: India Women 2, Sri Lanka Women 0.

5 July 2017
Scorecard
Australia 
290/8 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
131 (50 overs)
Ellyse Perry 66 (97)
Sana Mir 3/49 (10 overs)
Sana Mir 45 (85)
Kristen Beams 3/23 (9 overs)
Australia Women won by 159 runs
Grace Road, Leicester
Umpires: Anil Chaudhary (Ind) and Sue Redfern (Eng)
Player of the match: Elyse Villani (Aus)

6 July 2017
Scorecard
West Indies 
150 (43 overs)
v
 New Zealand
151/2 (18.2 overs)
Kyshona Knight 41 (60)
Leigh Kasperek 3/17 (10 overs)
Rachel Priest 90 (55)
Anisa Mohammed 1/26 (3 overs)
New Zealand Women won by 8 wickets
County Ground, Taunton
Umpires: Ahsan Raza (Pak) and Adrian Holdstock (SA)
Player of the match: Leigh Kasperek (NZ)
  • New Zealand Women won the toss and elected to field.
  • Akeira Peters (West Indies Women) made her WODI debut.
  • Points: New Zealand Women 2, West Indies Women 0.

Round 5[edit]

8 July 2017
Scorecard
Pakistan 
144 (46.5 overs)
v
 New Zealand
147/2 (15 overs)
Sana Mir 50 (86)
Hannah Rowe 3/22 (9 overs)
Sophie Devine 93 (41)
Diana Baig 1/28 (4 overs)
New Zealand Women won by 8 wickets
County Ground, Taunton
Umpires: Gregory Brathwaite (WI) and Sharfuddoula (Ban)
Player of the match: Hannah Rowe (NZ)
  • Pakistan Women won the toss and elected to bat.
  • Sana Mir (Pak) played her 100th WODI[25] and Lea Tahuhu (NZ) played her 50th WODI.[26]
  • Sophie Devine (NZ) hit nine sixes in her innings of 93, the most by a woman in a WODI.[27]
  • Points: New Zealand Women 2, Pakistan Women 0.
  • Pakistan Women were eliminated as a result of this match.[28]

8 July 2017
Scorecard
South Africa 
273/9 (50 overs)
v
 India
158 (46 overs)
Lizelle Lee 92 (65)
Shikha Pandey 3/40 (9 overs)
Deepti Sharma 60 (111)
Dane van Niekerk 4/22 (10 overs)
South Africa Women won by 115 runs
Grace Road, Leicester
Umpires: Jacqueline Williams (WI) and Paul Wilson (Aus)
Player of the match: Dane van Niekerk (SA)
  • India Women won the toss and elected to field.
  • Points: South Africa Women 2, India Women 0.
  • Sri Lanka Women and West Indies Women were eliminated as a result of this match.

9 July 2017
Scorecard
England 
259/8 (50 overs)
v
 Australia
256/8 (50 overs)
Tammy Beaumont 49 (88)
Elyse Villani 3/42 (5 overs)
Ellyse Perry 70 (86)
Alex Hartley 2/31 (10 overs)
England Women won by 3 runs
Bristol County Ground, Bristol
Umpires: Chris Brown (NZ) and Adrian Holdstock (SA)
Player of the match: Katherine Brunt (Eng)
  • England Women won the toss and elected to bat.
  • Points: England Women 2, Australia Women 0.
  • This was England Women's first win against Australia Women in a World Cup since 1993.[29]

9 July 2017
Scorecard
West Indies 
229/9 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
182 (48 overs)
Merissa Aguilleira 46* (59)
Sripali Weerakkody 3/38 (10 overs)
Shashikala Siriwardene 33 (67)
Anisa Mohammed 3/39 (10 overs)
West Indies Women won by 47 runs
County Ground, Derby
Umpires: Shaun George (SA) and Claire Polosak (Aus)
Player of the match: Anisa Mohammed (WI)
  • Sri Lanka Women won the toss and elected to field.
  • Points: West Indies Women 2, Sri Lanka Women 0.

Round 6[edit]

11 July 2017
Scorecard
West Indies 
285/4 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
117/3 (24 overs)
Deandra Dottin 104* (76)
Asmavia Iqbal 2/76 (10 overs)
Javeria Khan 58* (72)
Anisa Mohammed 2/21 (4 overs)
West Indies Women won by 19 runs (D/L method)
Grace Road, Leicester
Umpires: Sue Redfern (Eng) and Langton Rusere (Zim)
Player of the match: Deandra Dottin (WI)
  • Pakistan Women won the toss and elected to field.
  • Rain during Pakistan Women's innings set them a revised target of 137 runs from 24 overs.
  • Deandra Dottin scored her first century in a WODI,[30] and the fastest by a West Indies woman (71 balls).[31]
  • Points: West Indies Women 2, Pakistan Women 0.

12 July 2017
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
101 (40.3 overs)
v
 South Africa
104/2 (23.1 overs)
Dilani Manodara 25 (49)
Dane van Niekerk 4/24 (8 overs)
Laura Wolvaardt 48* (66)
Inoka Ranaweera 1/20 (6 overs)
South Africa Women won by 8 wickets
County Ground, Taunton
Umpires: Gregory Brathwaite (WI) and Kathy Cross (NZ)
Player of the match: Dane van Niekerk (SA)
  • Sri Lanka Women won the toss and elected to bat.
  • Points: South Africa Women 2, Sri Lanka Women 0.

12 July 2017
Scorecard
India 
226/7 (50 overs)
v
 Australia
227/2 (45.1 overs)
Poonam Raut 106 (136)
Ellyse Perry 2/37 (10 overs)
Meg Lanning 76 (88)
Poonam Yadav 1/46 (8 overs)
Australia Women won by 8 wickets
Bristol County Ground, Bristol
Umpires: Adrian Holdstock (SA) and Sharfuddoula (Ban)
Player of the match: Meg Lanning (Aus)
  • Australia Women won the toss and elected to field.
  • Mithali Raj (Ind) became the leading run-scorer in WODIs, passing the previous record of 5,992 runs set by Charlotte Edwards (Eng), and became the first woman to pass 6,000 runs in WODIs.[32][33]
  • Points: Australia Women 2, India Women 0.
  • Australia Women qualified for the semi-finals as a result of this match.[34]

12 July 2017
Scorecard
England 
284/9 (50 overs)
v
 New Zealand
209 (46.4 overs)
Natalie Sciver 129 (111)
Amelia Kerr 4/51 (9 overs)
Suzie Bates 44 (68)
Alex Hartley 3/44 (9.4 overs)
England Women won by 75 runs
County Ground, Derby
Umpires: Ahsan Raza (Pak) and Jacqueline Williams (WI)
Player of the match: Natalie Sciver (Eng)
  • England Women won the toss and elected to bat.
  • Katherine Brunt (Eng) and Amy Satterthwaite (NZ) both played in their 100th WODI.[35][36]
  • Points: England Women 2, New Zealand Women 0.
  • England Women and South Africa Women qualified for the semi-finals as a result of this match.[37][38]

Round 7[edit]

15 July 2017
Scorecard
Australia 
269 (48.3 overs)
v
 South Africa
210 (50 overs)
Nicole Bolton 79 (87)
Suné Luus 5/67 (10 overs)
Laura Wolvaardt 71 (94)
Rachael Haynes 2/12 (2 overs)
Australia Women won by 59 runs
County Ground, Taunton
Umpires: Chris Brown (NZ) and Langton Rusere (Zim)
Player of the match: Ellyse Perry (Aus)
  • Australia Women won the toss and elected to bat.
  • Points: Australia Women 2, South Africa Women 0.

15 July 2017
Scorecard
England 
220/7 (50 overs)
v
 West Indies
128/9 (50 overs)
Heather Knight 67 (88)
Afy Fletcher 3/33 (10 overs)
Hayley Matthews 29 (64)
Natalie Sciver 3/3 (4 overs)
England Women won by 92 runs
Bristol County Ground, Bristol
Umpires: Anil Chaudhary (Ind) and Paul Wilson (Aus)
Player of the match: Heather Knight (Eng)
  • West Indies Women won the toss and elected to field.
  • Points: England Women 2, West Indies Women 0.

15 July 2017
Scorecard
India 
265/7 (50 overs)
v
 New Zealand
79 (25.3 overs)
Mithali Raj 109 (123)
Leigh Kasperek 3/45 (10 overs)
Amy Satterthwaite 26 (47)
Rajeshwari Gayakwad 5/15 (7.3 overs)
India Women won by 186 runs
County Ground, Derby
Umpires: Shaun George (SA) and Claire Polosak (Aus)
Player of the match: Mithali Raj (Ind)
  • New Zealand Women won the toss and elected to field.
  • This was India Women's biggest win, in terms of runs, in a Women's World Cup.[39]
  • Rajeshwari Gayakwad (Ind) recorded the best bowling figures for a bowler for India Women in Women's World Cups.[39]
  • This was the lowest all-out total made by New Zealand Women in Women's World Cups.[39]
  • Points: India Women 2, New Zealand Women 0.
  • India Women qualified for the semi-finals as a result of this match.[40]

15 July 2017
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
221/7 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
206 (46.4 overs)
Dilani Manodara 84 (111)
Diana Baig 3/41 (10 overs)
Nain Abidi 57 (68)
Chandima Gunaratne 4/41 (10 overs)
Sri Lanka Women won by 15 runs
Grace Road, Leicester
Umpires: Kathy Cross (NZ) and Sue Redfern (Eng)
Player of the match: Chandima Gunaratne (SL)
  • Sri Lanka Women won the toss and elected to bat.
  • Shashikala Siriwardene (SL) played in her 100th WODI.
  • Points: Sri Lanka Women 2, Pakistan Women 0.

Knockout stage[edit]

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
18 July – County Ground, Bristol
 
 
 South Africa 218/6
 
23 July – Lord's, London
 
 England 221/8
 
 England 228/7
 
20 July – County Ground, Derby
 
 India 219
 
 India 281/4
 
 
 Australia 245
 

Semi-finals[edit]

Semi Final 1
18 July 2017
Scorecard
South Africa 
218/6 (50 overs)
v
 England
221/8 (49.4 overs)
Mignon du Preez 76* (95)
Heather Knight 1/8 (2 overs)
Sarah Taylor 54 (76)
Suné Luus 2/24 (5 overs)
England Women won by 2 wickets
Bristol County Ground, Bristol
Umpires: Gregory Brathwaite (WI) and Paul Wilson (Aus)
Player of the match: Sarah Taylor (Eng)
  • South Africa Women won the toss and elected to bat.

Semi Final 2
20 July 2017
Scorecard
India 
281/4 (42 overs)
v
 Australia
245 (40.1 overs)
Harmanpreet Kaur 171* (115)
Elyse Villani 1/19 (1 over)
Alex Blackwell 90 (56)
Deepti Sharma 3/59 (7.1 overs)
India Women won by 36 runs
County Ground, Derby
Umpires: Ahsan Raza (Pak) and Shaun George (SA)
Player of the match: Harmanpreet Kaur (Ind)
  • India Women won the toss and elected to bat.
  • Rain reduced the match to 42 overs per side.
  • Harmanpreet Kaur (Ind) made the highest score by a woman in the knockout stages of World Cups and the highest individual score for India in a Women's World Cup.[41]

Final[edit]

It was announced on 8 February 2016 that Lord's would host the Final on 23 July 2017.[42]

Final
23 July 2017
Scorecard
England 
228/7 (50 overs)
v
 India
219 (48.4 overs)
Natalie Sciver 51 (68)
Jhulan Goswami 3/23 (10 overs)
Poonam Raut 85 (115)
Anya Shrubsole 6/46 (9.4 overs)
England Women won by 9 runs
Lord's, London
Umpires: Gregory Brathwaite (WI) and Shaun George (SA)
Player of the match: Anya Shrubsole (Eng)
  • England Women won the toss and elected to bat.

Broadcast[edit]

In May 2017, the ICC announced that 10 games will be shown live on television, while the remaining 21 matches will be streamed live via the ICC website.[43] The 10 televised matches featured DRS for the first time in women's cricket.[44]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Officially, the tournament was hosted by England and Wales, as the England and Wales Cricket Board governs the sport in both countries; however, all matches took place in England.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Match dates revealed for ICC Women's World Cup 2017". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 5 February 2017. 
  2. ^ "Women's Cricket, Long Sidelined, Moves Into Spotlight". The New York Times. Retrieved 22 July 2017. 
  3. ^ "Women's World Cup: England beat India by nine runs in thrilling final at Lord's". BBC Sport. Retrieved 23 July 2017. 
  4. ^ "World Cup 2017: Women's Championship will form qualifying". BBC Sport. 4 July 2014. Retrieved 12 February 2016. 
  5. ^ "Women's World Cup: Five venues named for 2017 tournament". BBC Sport. Retrieved 8 February 2016. 
  6. ^ "Lord's to host 2017 Women's World Cup final". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 8 February 2016. 
  7. ^ "Practice match schedule announced for ICC Women's World Cup 2017". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 22 April 2017. 
  8. ^ "Match officials announced for ICC Women's World Cup 2017". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 18 June 2017. 
  9. ^ "Sue Redfern set to make history". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 23 June 2017. 
  10. ^ "ICC Women's World Cup 2017 venues announced". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 26 October 2016. 
  11. ^ "ICC Women's World Cup schedule announced on International Women's Day". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  12. ^ "Practice match schedule announced for ICC Women's World Cup 2017". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 21 April 2017. 
  13. ^ a b "Qualification scenarios - What the top five have to do". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 15 July 2017. 
  14. ^ "Stats: Women's World Cup 2017 – a batters' game". Wisden. 30 June 2017. Retrieved 6 July 2017. 
  15. ^ "Ismail, Luus lift South Africa to thrilling win". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 25 June 2017. 
  16. ^ "Ashleigh Gardner stands on the cusp of history". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 26 June 2017. 
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External links[edit]