2018–19 Formula E season

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2018–19 Formula E season
Drivers' Champion: Jean-Éric Vergne
Teams' Champion: DS Techeetah
Previous: 2017–18 Next: 2019–20
Support series:
Jaguar I-Pace eTrophy
Jean-Éric Vergne won his second Drivers' Championship, becoming the first Formula E Driver in history to win multiple Driver Championships
Techeetah won the Teams' Champions

The 2018–19 FIA Formula E season was the fifth season of the FIA Formula E championship, a motor racing championship for electrically-powered vehicles recognised by motorsport's governing body, the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA), as the highest class of competition for electric open-wheel racing cars.

The 2018–19 season saw the introduction of the all-new Gen2, second generation Formula E car, which boasted significant technological advances over the previous Spark-Renault SRT 01E chassis – its power output rose from 200 kW to 250 kW and top speeds rose to around 280 km/h (174 mph). The arrival of the Gen2 car also saw an end to the series’ mid-race car-swaps.[1]

Frenchman Jean-Éric Vergne entered as the defending Drivers’ Champion after securing his first title at the New York City ePrix,[2] while Audi Sport Abt Schaeffler returned as defending Teams’ Champions – having beaten Vergne's Techeetah team by a narrow two point margin.[3]

The 2019 Hong Kong ePrix was the 50th race of Formula E since its inception in 2014. Formula E has raced in 22 cities in 17 countries across five continents and has seen 13 global manufactures compete in the series. Four drivers have started every Formula E race; they are Lucas di Grassi, Sam Bird, Daniel Abt and Jérôme d'Ambrosio.[4]

The 2018–19 season was the first to have an official support category since Greenpower ran the Schools Series during Formula E's debut 2014-15 season.[5] The Jaguar I-Pace eTrophy will feature at 10 of the 13 Rounds of this year's calendar.[6]

After the first race in New York City, Jean-Eric Vergne secured enough points to become the Drivers' Champion, winning his second Formula E championship.[7] Techeetah won their first constructor's championship.[8]

Teams and drivers[edit]

Team Manufacturer Powertrain No. Drivers Rounds
United Kingdom Envision Virgin Racing Spark-Audi[9] Audi e-tron FE05 2 United Kingdom Sam Bird[10] All
4 Netherlands Robin Frijns[11] All
United Kingdom Panasonic Jaguar Racing Spark-Jaguar Jaguar I-Type 3 3 Brazil Nelson Piquet Jr.[12] 1–6
United Kingdom Alex Lynn[13] 7–13
20 New Zealand Mitch Evans[12] All
Germany HWA Racelab[14] SparkVenturi Venturi VFE05 5 Belgium Stoffel Vandoorne[15] All
17 United Kingdom Gary Paffett[16] All
United States GEOX Dragon[17] SparkPenske[18] Penske EV-3 6 Germany Maximilian Günther[19] 1–3, 7–13
Brazil Felipe Nasr[20] 4–6
7 Argentina José María López[21] All
United Kingdom NIO Formula E Team SparkNIO[18] NIO Sport 004 8 France Tom Dillmann[22] All
16 United Kingdom Oliver Turvey[22] All
Germany Audi Sport ABT Schaeffler SparkAudi Audi e-tron FE05 11 Brazil Lucas di Grassi[23] All
66 Germany Daniel Abt[24] All
Monaco Venturi Formula E Team SparkVenturi Venturi VFE05 19 Brazil Felipe Massa[25] All
48 Switzerland Edoardo Mortara[26] All
France Nissan e.dams[27][28] SparkNissan Nissan IM01 22 United Kingdom Oliver Rowland[29] All
23 Switzerland Sébastien Buemi[30] All
China DS Techeetah SparkDS Automobiles[31] DS E-Tense FE 19 25 France Jean-Éric Vergne[32] All
36 Germany André Lotterer[33] All
United States BMW i Andretti Motorsport[27][N 1] SparkBMW[35] BMW IFE.18 27 United Kingdom Alexander Sims[36] All
28 Portugal António Félix da Costa[36] All
India Mahindra Racing SparkMahindra[37] Mahindra M5Electro 64 Belgium Jérôme d'Ambrosio[38] All
94 Sweden Felix Rosenqvist[39] 1
Germany Pascal Wehrlein[38] 2–13

Team changes[edit]

Driver changes[edit]

Mid-season changes[edit]

Calendar[edit]

The 2018-2019 championship was contested over thirteen rounds in Europe, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, North America and South America.

Round ePrix Country Circuit Date
1 Ad Diriyah ePrix[51]  Saudi Arabia Riyadh Street Circuit[52] 15 December 2018
2 Marrakesh ePrix  Morocco Circuit International Automobile Moulay El Hassan 12 January 2019
3 Santiago ePrix  Chile Parque O'Higgins Circuit[53] 26 January 2019
4 Mexico City ePrix  Mexico Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez 16 February 2019
5 Hong Kong ePrix  Hong Kong Hong Kong Central Harbourfront Circuit 10 March 2019
6 Sanya ePrix  China Haitang Bay Circuit[54] 23 March 2019
7 Rome ePrix  Italy Circuito Cittadino dell'EUR 13 April 2019
8 Paris ePrix  France Circuit des Invalides 27 April 2019
9 Monaco ePrix  Monaco Circuit de Monaco 11 May 2019
10 Berlin ePrix  Germany Tempelhof Airport Street Circuit 25 May 2019
11 Swiss ePrix[55][56]   Switzerland Bern Street Circuit 22 June 2019
12 New York City ePrix Race 1  United States Brooklyn Street Circuit 13 July 2019
13 New York City ePrix Race 2 14 July 2019
Source:[57][58]

Calendar changes[edit]

  • The series returned to Monaco as the Monaco ePrix is run as a biennial event that alternates with the Historic Grand Prix of Monaco.[59]
  • Formula E made its début in Saudi Arabia with the race to take place on a street circuit in the Ad Diriyah district of Riyadh.[52][60] The event replaced the Hong Kong ePrix as the opening round of the championship.
  • The championship was due to race in São Paulo for the first time. The race had originally been included on the 2017–18 Formula E season calendar before being delayed for one year and replaced with the Punta del Este ePrix.[61] However, the São Paulo race was not included on the provisional calendar published in June 2018 and the Punta del Este race was removed from the schedule.[57]
  • A new ePrix in Mainland China was added to the calendar with the Hainan resort city of Sanya named as the venue.[62] The series had previously raced in Beijing.[57]
  • The Santiago ePrix changed its location from Parque Forestal to a bespoke circuit in O'Higgins Park. The move was made following complaints by the residents of Barrio Lastarria, who argued against the original track layout.[53]
  • The Swiss ePrix was moved from Zürich to Bern after the former's city officials expressed concerns about the ability of the city's infrastructure to handle a series of large-scale events in quick succession. Organisers have the option to return to Zürich in future seasons.[63]

European Races[edit]

As Jean-Éric Vergne had scored the most podiums during the European leg of the season, he was awarded a trophy by the title sponsor voestalpine, thus becoming the first ever recipient of the trophy.

A separate competition within the overall Formula E Championship structure which includes all European cities that are part of the calendar has been included.[64] The driver who achieves the best podium finishes of all five races will be awarded a trophy produced by voestalpine.[65][N 2]

Changes[edit]

Technical regulations[edit]

Gen2 car of Edoardo Mortara at the 2019 Hong Kong ePrix showing the Halo LEDs light.
  • The Spark-Renault SRT 01E, which was used by the championship since its inaugural season, was replaced by a brand-new chassis.[67] The new chassis, which was also developed by Spark Racing Technology, is known as the SRT05e and eschews the conventional design of having a rear wing in favour of incorporating aerodynamic elements into the chassis and floor.[68]
  • The category used a new standardised battery produced by McLaren Applied Technologies and Atieva.[69][70] Each driver is only allowed to use one car per race, thus the battery life now lasts the whole race instead of half distance.[71]
  • The series introduced new brakes, as Spark Racing Technology chose Brembo as the sole supplier of the entire braking system for all the single-seaters: discs, calipers, pads, bells and tandem pump.[72][73]
  • The maximum power output of the cars increased to 250 kW.[74] Cars have a series of pre-set power modes which were introduced to encourage strategic racing without allowing a team to gain a competitive advantage through powertrain development.[75]
  • The series also introduced a system officially called "attack mode" or dubbed "Mario Kart mode" in which drivers receive an additional 25 kW of power by driving through a designated area of the circuit off the racing line. The duration of the boost mode and the number of boosts available was meant to only decided shortly ahead of each race by the FIA to stop teams from anticipating its use and incorporating it into race strategy.[76][77] However, this largely did not happen, with all events except the second race in New York having two attack mode activations of 4 minutes each, with the final race having 3 activations, also of 4 minutes each.
  • The "halo" cockpit protection device was introduced on the chassis to meet the FIA rules that the halo should be involved in all single seater series by 2020.[78][79]

Sporting regulations[edit]

  • Races were no longer run to a set number of laps. Rather, they ran for forty-five minutes and complete an additional lap once the time limit has expired.[77]

Results and standings[edit]

ePrix[edit]

Round Race Pole position Fastest lap Winning driver Winning team Report
1 Saudi Arabia Ad Diriyah Portugal António Félix da Costa Germany André Lotterer Portugal António Félix da Costa United Kingdom BMW i Andretti Motorsport[N 1] Report
2 Morocco Marrakesh United Kingdom Sam Bird Brazil Lucas di Grassi Belgium Jérôme d'Ambrosio India Mahindra Racing Report
3 Chile Santiago Switzerland Sébastien Buemi[N 3] Germany Daniel Abt United Kingdom Sam Bird United Kingdom Envision Virgin Racing Report
4 Mexico Mexico City Germany Pascal Wehrlein Germany Pascal Wehrlein Brazil Lucas di Grassi Germany Audi Sport Abt Schaeffler Report
5 Hong Kong Hong Kong Belgium Stoffel Vandoorne Germany André Lotterer[N 4] Switzerland Edoardo Mortara[N 5] Monaco Venturi Formula E Team Report
6 China Sanya United Kingdom Oliver Rowland France Jean-Éric Vergne France Jean-Éric Vergne China DS Techeetah Report
7 Italy Rome Germany André Lotterer France Jean-Éric Vergne[N 6] New Zealand Mitch Evans United Kingdom Panasonic Jaguar Racing Report
8 France Paris United Kingdom Oliver Rowland[N 7] France Tom Dillmann[N 8] Netherlands Robin Frijns United Kingdom Envision Virgin Racing Report
9 Monaco Monaco United Kingdom Oliver Rowland[N 9] Germany Pascal Wehrlein France Jean-Éric Vergne China DS Techeetah Report
10 Germany Berlin Switzerland Sébastien Buemi Brazil Lucas di Grassi Brazil Lucas di Grassi Germany Audi Sport Abt Schaeffler Report
11 Switzerland Bern France Jean-Éric Vergne Portugal António Félix da Costa[N 10] France Jean-Éric Vergne China DS Techeetah Report
12 United States New York City Switzerland Sébastien Buemi France Jean-Éric Vergne[N 11] Switzerland Sébastien Buemi France Nissan e.dams Report
13 United Kingdom Alexander Sims Germany Daniel Abt Netherlands Robin Frijns United Kingdom Envision Virgin Racing

Drivers' Championship standings[edit]

Points were awarded to the top ten classified finishers in every race, the pole position starter, and the driver who set the fastest lap, using the following structure:

Position  1st   2nd   3rd   4th   5th   6th   7th   8th   9th   10th   Pole   FL 
Points 25 18 15 12 10 8 6 4 2 1 3 1
Pos. Driver ADR
Saudi Arabia
MRK
Morocco
SCL
Chile
MEX
Mexico
HKG
Hong Kong
SYX
China
RME
Italy
PAR
France
MCO
Monaco
BER
Germany
BRN
Switzerland
NYC
United States
Pts
1 France Jean-Éric Vergne 2 5 Ret 13 13 1 14 6 1 3 1 15 7 136
2 Switzerland Sébastien Buemi 6 8* Ret* 21†* Ret* 8* 5* 15* 5* 2* 3* 1* 3* 119
3 Brazil Lucas di Grassi 9* 7 12 1* 2 15†* 7* 4 Ret 1 9* 5* 18†* 108
4 Netherlands Robin Frijns 12 2 5 11 3 14† 4 1 17† 13 Ret Ret 1 106
5 New Zealand Mitch Evans 4 9 6 7 7 9 1 16 6 12 2 2 17 105
6 Portugal António Félix da Costa 1* Ret* Ret* 2* 10* 3* 9* 7* DSQ* 4* 12* 3* 9* 99
7 Germany Daniel Abt 8* 10 3* 10* 4* 5* 18†* 3* 15* 6* 6* 6* 5* 95
8 Germany André Lotterer 5 6 13 5 14 4 2 2 7 Ret 14 17 Ret 86
9 United Kingdom Sam Bird 11 3 1 9 6 Ret 11 11 16† 9 4 8 4 85
10 United Kingdom Oliver Rowland 7 15 Ret 20† Ret 2 6 12 2 8 Ret 14 6 71
11 Belgium Jérôme d'Ambrosio 3 1 10* 4 Ret 6 8 17† 11 17 13 9 11 67
12 Germany Pascal Wehrlein Ret* 2 6 Ret* 7 10 10 4 10 Ret 7 12 58
13 United Kingdom Alexander Sims 18 4 7 14 Ret Ret 17 Ret 13 7 11 4 2 57
14 Switzerland Edoardo Mortara 19 13 4 3 1 13 Ret Ret Ret 11 Ret Ret Ret 52
15 Brazil Felipe Massa 17* 18* Ret 8 5 10 Ret 9* 3 15* 8 16† 15 36
16 Belgium Stoffel Vandoorne 16* Ret* Ret* 18* Ret* Ret* 3* Ret* 9* 5* 10* 13* 8* 35
17 Germany Maximilian Günther 15 12 Ret 19† 5 Ret 14 5 Ret 19† 20
18 United Kingdom Alex Lynn 12 Ret 8 Ret 7 Ret 16 10
19 United Kingdom Gary Paffett Ret Ret 14 16 8 Ret Ret 8 12 16 17 11 10 9
20 United Kingdom Oliver Turvey 13 16 8 12 9 11 13 14 Ret 18 16 10 13 7
21 Argentina José María López Ret 11 9 17 11 Ret 16 13 10* 20 DSQ 12 Ret 3
22 Brazil Nelson Piquet, Jr. 10 14 11 Ret Ret Ret 1
23 France Tom Dillmann 14 17 Ret 15 12 12 15 Ret 14 19 15 Ret 14 0
24 Brazil Felipe Nasr 19 Ret Ret 0
25 Sweden Felix Rosenqvist Ret 0
Pos. Driver ADR
Saudi Arabia
MRK
Morocco
SCL
Chile
MEX
Mexico
HKG
Hong Kong
SYX
China
RME
Italy
PAR
France
MCO
Monaco
BER
Germany
BRN
Switzerland
NYC
United States
Pts
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Retired (Ret)
Red Did not qualify (DNQ)
Did not pre-qualify (DNPQ)
Black Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Withdrew (WD)
Race cancelled (C)
Blank Did not participate (DNP)
Excluded (EX)

Bold – Pole
Italics – Fastest Lap
* – FanBoost

† – Drivers did not finish the race, but were classified as they completed more than 90% of the race distance.

Teams' Championship standings[edit]

Pos. Team No. ADR
Saudi Arabia
MRK
Morocco
SCL
Chile
MEX
Mexico
HKG
Hong Kong
SYX
China
RME
Italy
PAR
France
MCO
Monaco
BER
Germany
BRN
Switzerland
NYC
United States
Pts
1 China DS Techeetah 25 2 5 Ret 13 13 1 14 6 1 3 1 15 7 222
36 5 6 13 5 14 4 2 2 7 Ret 14 17 Ret
2 Germany Audi Sport ABT Schaeffler Formula E Team 11 9 7 12 1 2 15† 7 4 Ret 1 9 5 18† 203
66 8 10 3 10 4 5 18† 3 15 6 6 6 5
3 United Kingdom Envision Virgin Racing 2 11 3 1 9 6 Ret 11 11 16† 9 4 8 4 191
4 12 2 5 11 3 14† 4 1 17† 13 Ret Ret 1
4 France Nissan e.dams 22 7 15 Ret 20† Ret 2 6 12 2 8 Ret 14 6 190
23 6 8 Ret 21† Ret 8 5 15 5 2 3 1 3
5 United States BMW i Andretti Motorsport 27 18 4 7 14 Ret Ret 17 Ret 13 7 11 4 2 156
28 1 Ret Ret 2 10 3 9 7 DSQ 4 12 3 9
6 India Mahindra Racing 64 3 1 10 4 Ret 6 8 17† 11 17 13 9 11 125
94 Ret Ret 2 6 Ret 7 10 10 4 10 Ret 7 12
7 United Kingdom Panasonic Jaguar Racing 3 10 14 11 Ret Ret Ret 12 Ret 8 Ret 7 Ret 16 116
20 4 9 6 7 7 9 1 16 6 12 2 2 17
8 Monaco Venturi Formula E Team 19 17 18 Ret 8 5 10 Ret 9 3 15 8 16† 15 88
48 19 13 4 3 1 13 Ret Ret Ret 11 Ret Ret Ret
9 Germany HWA Racelab 5 16 Ret Ret 18 Ret Ret 3 Ret 9 5 10 13 8 44
17 Ret Ret 14 16 8 Ret Ret 8 12 16 17 11 10
10 United States GEOX Dragon 6 15 12 Ret 19 Ret Ret 19† 5 Ret 14 5 Ret 19† 23
7 Ret 11 9 17 11 Ret 16 13 10 20 DSQ 12 Ret
11 United Kingdom NIO Formula E Team 8 14 17 Ret 15 12 12 15 Ret 14 19 15 Ret 14 7
16 13 16 8 12 9 11 13 14 Ret 18 16 10 13
Pos. Team No. ADR
Saudi Arabia
MRK
Morocco
SCL
Chile
MEX
Mexico
HKG
Hong Kong
SYX
China
RME
Italy
PAR
France
MCO
Monaco
BER
Germany
BRN
Switzerland
NYC
United States
Pts

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b BMW i Andretti Motorsport raced in Riyadh under a British license.[34]
  2. ^ The original plan was to award the driver who has collected the most points in all the European races.[64][66]
  3. ^ Lucas di Grassi set the fastest time but was excluded for driving infringement.
  4. ^ Point for Fastest Lap awarded to Sam Bird as Lotterer did not finish inside the top 10.
  5. ^ Sam Bird and Envision Virgin Racing were initial winners but was given 5-second time penalty for causing a collision.
  6. ^ Point for Fastest Lap awarded to Sebastien Buemi as Vergne did not finish inside the top 10.
  7. ^ Pascal Wehrlein set the fastest time but was excluded for a technical infringement.
  8. ^ Point for Fastest Lap awarded to Robin Frijns as Dillmann did not finish inside the top 10.
  9. ^ Oliver Rowland set the fastest time and received three points for pole position and the award but had a three-place grid penalty for colliding with Alexander Sims in the Paris E-Prix. Therefore, he started in fourth place while Jean-Éric Vergne started in pole position.
  10. ^ Point for Fastest Lap awarded to Sam Bird as da Costa did not finish inside the top 10.
  11. ^ Point for Fastest Lap awarded to Daniel Abt as Vergne did not finish inside the top 10.

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