2018–19 Six Day Series

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

2018–2019 Six Day Series
Third edition of the Six Day Series
Details
Dates23 October 2018 – 14 April 2019
LocationLondon
Berlin
Copenhagen
Melbourne
Hong Kong
Manchester
Brisbane
Rounds7
← 2017–18

The 2018–19 Six Day Series (also known as the Six Day Cycling Series is a multi six-day track cycling race tournament over a season. It is the 3rd series organised by the Madison Sports Group (MSG). This season consists of 7 events across 5 countries.

It will be the first edition of the World Cup to feature countries in Asia-Pacific. Two events will be held in Melbourne and Brisbane as the final in Australia.[1] In January 2019, Hong Kong was announced as a new stage to introduce 6-day racing in Asia as the latest frontier.[2] Those three stages will race during 3-day weekends instead of the standard 6-day format.

Series[edit]

In August 2018 the MSG revealed the location and dates of the Six Day Series meetings for the season. Six rounds were scheduled in London, United Kingdom; Berlin, Germany; Copenhagen, Denmark; Melbourne, Australia; Manchester and Brisbane.[3] In January, a round in Hong Kong was added into the schedule.

London, United Kingdom[edit]

Round 1 was held at the Lee Valley VeloPark, on October 23-28 October 2018. Completed in 2011, the velodrome was the site of the 2012 Olympic Games and 2012 Paralympic Games track events. It has hosted the UCI Track Cycling World Cup (2011-12, 2014-15), and the 2016 UCI Track Cycling World Championships. The 6750-capacity velodrome has also been used for the British Revolution track series, British National Track Championships and was the site of Sir Bradley Wiggins' successful Hour Record ride in 2015.[4]

Berlin, Germany[edit]

Round 2, to be held in Velodrom from January 24-29 January 2019. The velodrome was designed by internationally-renowned French architect Dominique Perrault for Berlin's 2000 Olympic Games bid. It was built in 1997 on the site of the former Werner-Seelenbinder-Halle. Since opening, it has played host to the 2017 European Track Championships, the 1998 UCI Track Cycling World Cup Classics and the 1999 UCI Track Cycling World Championships. Since 1997, the traditional Six Days of Berlin has also taken place here. In preparation for the 2017 European Track Championships, the track was rebuilt.[5]

Copenhagen, Denmark[edit]

Denmark's Ballerup Super Arena is situated in the capital. It will host the third round, on January 31-February 5. The velodrome was completed in 2001 and hosted the 2002 UCI Track Cycling World Championships and 2010 UCI Track Cycling World Championships. It can hold 6,500 spectators.

Melbourne, Australia[edit]

The fourth round will be hosted on between 7-9 February at the Melbourne Arena. It hosted the UCI Track Cycling World Championships (2004, 2012), in addition to the 2006 Commonwealth Games track events and numerous rounds of the UCI Track World Cup.[6]

Hong Kong[edit]

The fifth round of this Six Day Series will be hosted in Hong Kong between 8-10 March at the Hong Kong Velodrome. Opened in 2013, the velodrome hosted the final round of the UCI Track Cycling World Cup (2015-16, 2018-19), as well as the 2017 UCI Track Cycling World Championships, which is the first one in Asia in the 21st Century. It has permanent seating for 2,000 spectators, expandable to 3,000 for events such as the World Cup.[7]

Manchester, United Kingdom[edit]

The sxith round was hosted in Manchester, which is a big northwestern city of United Kingdom. This round will be held between 22-24 March. The Manchester Velodrome was completed in 1994 and is the home of British Cycling's National Cycling Centre.[8] The Manchester Velodrome already hosted the 2002 Commonwealth Games, UCI Track Cycling World Championships (1996, 2000, 2008), British National Track Championships and Revolution Cycling series.

Brisbane, Australia[edit]

The final would be held in Brisbane, Eastern city in Queensland during 12-14 April. Anna Meares Velodrome was completed in 2016 and named after Olympic gold medallist Anna Meares. It hosted the track cycling events at the 2018 Commonwealth Games.[9] Offices of Cycling Queensland are incorporated in the velodrome.

Format[edit]

The men compete in teams of two across the six days and women’s event across three days for the first three rounds.Sprinters will also compete for 6 days. There are certain differences in the races between 6 Day Series and UCI Track Cycling World Cup and UCI Track Cycling World Championships

The following events will be raced in the series:[3]

  • Derny, men
  • Team elimination, men and women
  • Sprint finals, men and women
  • Keirin, men and women
  • 200m flying time trial, men and women
  • Omnium, women
  • The Longest lap, men
  • Lap Record, men and women
  • Madison, men and women
  • 2 Lap madison time trial, men
  • 10 km scratch race, women

Results[edit]

Men[edit]

Germany Berlin | January 24-29 January 2019[10]
Rank Riders Day 1 Pts Day 2 Pts Day 3 Pts Day 4 Pts Day 5 Pts Day 6 Pts
1st, gold medalist(s) Germany Roger Kluge/Theo Reinhardt 90 158
(-1 lap)
246 289 358
(-1 lap)
470
2nd, silver medalist(s) Denmark Marc Hester/Jesper Morkov 83 161 237 299 357
(-1 lap)
482
(-1 lap)
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Austria Andreas Graf/Andreas Muller 53 130 206 273 324
(-1 lap)
414
(-1 lap)
4 BelgiumNetherlands Robbe Ghys/Wim Stroetinga 66 153
(-1 lap)
234 289 372 463
(-2 laps)
5 Poland Wojciech Pszczolarski/Daniel Staniszewski 68 125
(-1 lap)
220 290 355
(-1 lap)
437
(-2 laps)
6 Germany Henning Bommel/Kersten Thiele 71 137
(-1 lap)
215
(-2 laps)
296
(-2 laps)
340
(-4 laps)
406
(-6 laps)
7 BelgiumNetherlands Jules Hesters/Melvin Van Zijl 66 129
(-1 lap)
171
(-3 laps)
244
(-2 laps)
305
(-4 laps)
331
(-7 laps)
8 Germany Moritz Augenstein/Sebastian Schmiedel 70
(-1 lap)
134
(-4 laps)
181
(-6 laps)
237
(-6 laps)
271
(-10 laps)
323
(-13 laps)
9 Germany Maximilian Beyer/Achim Burkart 49
(-1 lap)
107
(-4 laps)
142
(-6 laps)
192
(-7 laps)
211
(-10 laps)
269
(-15 laps)
10 United Kingdom Chris Latham/Andrew Tennant
Australia Stephen Hall/Joshua Harrison
40
44
(-1 lap)
91
(-5 laps)
76
(-6 laps)
150
(-6 laps)
102
(-9 laps)
197
(-7 laps)
142
(-11 laps)
201
(-12 laps)
249
(-15 laps)
11 Netherlands Nick Stöpler/Maikel Zijlaard 34
(-1 lap)
70
(-6 laps)
122
(-7 laps)
170
(-8 laps)
212
(-12 laps)
237
(-15 laps)
12 Denmark Sebastian Lander/Matias Malmberg 37
(-1 laps)
62
(-7 laps)
95
(-11 laps)
130
(-11 laps)
162
(-17 laps)
196
(-21 laps)
13 Russia Denis Nekrasov/Sergey Rostovtsev 28
(-2 laps)
62
(-9 laps)
74
(-14 laps)
113
(-16 laps)
133
(-22 laps)
158
(-26 laps)
14 Germany Calvin Dik/Nils Weispfennig 30
(-4 laps)
57
(-12 laps)
130
(-15 laps)
76
(-17 laps)
135
(-23 laps)
147
(-28 laps)
15 Czech Republic Daniel Babor/Luděk Lichnovský 4
(-5 laps)
12
(-15 laps)
30
(-19 laps)
51
(-22 laps)
72
(-28 laps)
100
(-34 laps)

Women[edit]

Germany Berlin | January 24-29 January 2019[10]
Rank Riders Day 1 Pts Day 2 Pts Day 3 Pts
1st, gold medalist(s) Denmark Trine Schmidt 90 190 290
2nd, silver medalist(s) Denmark Julie Leth 82 182 264
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Russia Tamara Dronova 66 144 228
4 France Pascale Jeuland 74 150 228
5 Italy Elena Cecchini 60 138 206

Sprinters[edit]

Germany Berlin | January 24-29 January 2019[10]
Rank Riders Day 1 Pts Day 2 Pts Day 3 Pts Day 4 Pts Day 5 Pts Day 6 Pts
1st, gold medalist(s) Germany Maximilian Levy 50 98 148 198 223 273
2nd, silver medalist(s) Russia Denis Dmitriev 41 77 113 191 357
(-1 lap)
233
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Russia Shane Perkins 26 65 102 137 169 211
4 Russia Nikita Shurshin 42 66 96 116 143 173
5 Germany Anton Höhne 30 70 98 124 140 169
6 France Francois Pervis 24 50 82 116 128 148

Series Standings[edit]

At the end of each Six Day event the Series Standings are updated. Riders are aiming to secure enough points throughout the Series to reach the Six Day Final in Brisbane and a chance to be crowned 2018/19 Series Champions.[11]

Legend
Top riders qualify to 2019 Six Day Brisbane Final

Men[edit]

Rank Riders Points[11]
1 Netherlands Yoeri Havik/Wim Stroetinga 100
2 Australia Leigh Howard/Kelland O'Brien 80
3 Germany Roger Kluge/Theo Reinhardt 65
4 United Kingdom Chris Latham/Andy Tennant 50
5 Poland Wojciech Pszczolarski/Daniel Staniszewski 40
6 Denmark Marc Hester/Jesper Morkov 30
7 Belgium Jules Hesters/Otto Vergaerde 25
8 Austria Andreas Graf/Andreas Muller 20
9 Netherlands Nick Stöpler/Melvin Van Zijl 16
10 New Zealand Shane Archbold/Aaron Gate 12
11 Germany Henning Bommel/Kersten Thiele 10
12 Czech Republic Daniel Babor/Luděk Lichnovský 8

Women[edit]

Rank Riders Points[11]
1 Australia Georgia Baker 100
2 Australia Ashlee Ankudinoff 80
3 Australia Kristina Clonan 65
4 United Kingdom Emily Nelson 50
5 Netherlands Kirsten Wild 40
6 New Zealand Racquel Sheath 30
7 Australia Amy Pauwels 25
8 Poland Daria Pikulik 20
9 New Zealand Michaela Drummond 16
10 Russia Evgeniya Augustinas 12
11 Poland Wiktoria Pikulik 10
12 United Kingdom Elinor Barker 8

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Track Cycling: Brisbane Secures Six Day Track Series World Final". Bicycling Australia. Retrieved 2019-01-21.
  2. ^ "Nieuw evenement: 'Six Day Hong Kong". Baanwacht. Retrieved 21 January 2019.
  3. ^ a b "What is Six Day?". Six Day Series. Retrieved 2019-01-21.
  4. ^ "Sir Bradley Wiggins believes his hour record will be beaten next year". Berlin.de. 2018-07-19. Retrieved 2019-01-21.
  5. ^ "Six Day Berlin 2019". Berlin.de. 2018-07-19. Retrieved 2019-01-21.
  6. ^ "Six Day racing comes to Melbourne: What you need to know". Cycling Tips. 6 February 2019. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  7. ^ "UCI Track Cycling World Cup - Hong Kong - Information Bulletin" (pdf). UCI. Retrieved 17 August 2015.
  8. ^ "Manchester Velodrome 'track of champions' for sale". BBC News. 15 April 2018. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  9. ^ "Anna Meares Velodrome: World's newest indoor cycling venue unveiled". SMH. 12 November 2016. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  10. ^ a b c "2019 Six Day Berlin Results". Six Day Series. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  11. ^ a b c "2018/19 Series Standings". Six Day Series. Retrieved 7 February 2019.

External links[edit]