2018 African Nations Championship

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2018 African Nations Championship
2018 CHAN
2018 African Nations Championship.png
Tournament details
Host country Morocco
Dates 13 January – 4 February 2018
Teams 16 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s) 4 (in 4 host cities)
Final positions
Champions  Morocco (1st title)
Runners-up  Nigeria
Third place  Sudan
Fourth place  Libya
Tournament statistics
Matches played 32
Goals scored 58 (1.81 per match)
Top scorer(s) Morocco Ayoub El Kaabi (9 goals)
Best player Morocco Ayoub El Kaabi
Fair play award  Morocco
2016
2020

The 2018 African Nations Championship, known as the Total African Nations Championship (also referred to as CHAN 2018) was the 5th edition of the African Nations Championship, a biennial football tournament organized by the Confederation of African Football (CAF) exclusively featuring players from the respective national championships. It took place between 12 January and 4 February 2018. In February 2016, Kenya was announced as the host nation but in September 2017, CAF decided to change the host nation due to a lack of progress with preparations.[1][2] Morocco was announced as the host nation in October 2017.[3]

Unlike the African Cup of Nations, the competing national teams must be composed of players playing in their domestic league. For example, a Moroccan player is only eligible to play for the Morocco national team if he is playing for a Moroccan club.[4]

Hosts Morocco defeated Nigeria in the final to win their first title. DR Congo were the defending champions but failed to qualify for the first time ever after losing to Congo on away goals rule.

Host selection[edit]

Initially, Kenya was announced as the host nation in February 2016. But in September 2017, CAF decided to change the host nation due to a lack of progress with preparations.[5]

The CAF received three bids by the deadline of 30 September 2017 to replace Kenya as new hosts:[6]

The Ethiopian Football Federation did not provide the government's letter of guarantee, and were not considered. The CAF Emergency Committee decided to choose Morocco over Equatorial Guinea in October 2017.[7]

Qualification[edit]

The qualifying rounds took place from April to August 2017.[8]

Since Morocco had already qualified in the North Zone before being named as replacement hosts, their spot in the final tournament was re-allocated to Egypt, which lost to Morocco in the North Zone final qualifying round.[9] However, Egypt declined to participate citing a "congested domestic calendar".[10] As a result, the spot was reverted to Central-East Zone (as originally three teams would participate including Kenya as original hosts), and would go to the winner of a play-off in November 2017 between Ethiopia and Rwanda, the two teams which lost in the Central-East Zone final qualifying round.[11]

Qualified teams[edit]

The following 16 teams qualified for the final tournament.

Team Zone Appearance Previous best performance FIFA ranking
at start of event
 Cameroon Central Zone 3rd Quarter-finals (2011, 2016) 45
 Congo 2nd Group stage (2014) 96
 Equatorial Guinea 1st Debut 146
 Rwanda Central-East Zone 3rd Quarter-finals (2016) 113
 Sudan 2nd Third place (2011) 136
 Uganda 4th Group stage (2011, 2014, 2016) 75
 Libya North Zone 3rd Champions (2014) 88
 Morocco (hosts) 3rd Quarter-finals (2014) 40
 Angola South Zone 3rd Runners-up (2011) 141
 Namibia 1st Debut 118
 Zambia 3rd Third place (2009) 74
 Guinea West A Zone 2nd Fourth place (2016) 65
 Mauritania 2nd Group stage (2014) 99
 Burkina Faso West B Zone 2nd Group stage (2014) 44
 Ivory Coast 4th Third place (2016) 61
 Nigeria 3rd Third place (2014) 51

Venues[edit]

Matches were held in Casablanca, Marrakech, Agadir and Tangier.

Casablanca Marrakesh
Stade Mohamed V Stade de Marrakech
Capacity: 45,600 Capacity: 45,240
Stade de marrakech.jpg
Tangier Agadir
Stade Ibn Batouta Stade Adrar
Capacity: 45,000 Capacity: 45,480

Before their hosting rights were withdrawn, Football Kenya Federation planned to use four stadiums as competition venues.[12] However, only Nyayo National Stadium in Nairobi and Kasarani Stadium in Kasarani were considered to meet hosting requirements after CAF inspection, while Mombasa Municipal Stadium in Mombasa and Kinoru Stadium in Meru did not.[13]

Squads[edit]

Each squad can contain a maximum of 23 players (Regulations Article 72).[14] The finalized squads were announced by the CAF on 10 January 2018.[15][16] Players must play for clubs in their home country.

Match officials[edit]

A total of 32 match officials (16 referees and 16 assistant referees) were selected for the tournament. In addition, seven match official were selected to operate the video assistant referee (VAR) system starting from the quarter-finals, a first in African competitions.[17][18][19]

Draw[edit]

The draw of the final tournament was held on 17 November 2017, 19:30 WET (UTC±0), at Sofitel Rabat in Rabat, Morocco.[20]

The 16 teams were drawn into four groups of four teams.[21] The hosts Morocco were seeded in Group A. The remaining teams were seeded based on their results in the four most recent final tournaments: 2009 (multiplied by 1), 2011 (multiplied by 2), 2014 (multiplied by 3), 2016 (multiplied by 4):[22][23][24]

  • 7 points for winner
  • 5 points for runner-up
  • 3 points for semi-finalists
  • 2 points for quarter-finalists
  • 1 point for group stage

Based on the formula above, the four pots were allocated as follows:

Pot 1 Pot 2 Pot 3 Pot 4
  1.  Morocco (hosts) (10 pts)
  2.  Libya (22 pts)
  3.  Ivory Coast (15 pts)
  4.  Angola (14 pts)
  1.  Nigeria (13 pts)
  2.  Guinea (12 pts)
  3.  Cameroon (12 pts)
  4.  Zambia (11 pts)
  1.  Rwanda (10 pts)
  2.  Uganda (9 pts)
  3.  Sudan (6 pts)
  4.  Congo (3 pts)
  1.  Burkina Faso (3 pts)
  2.  Mauritania (3 pts)
  3.  Namibia (0 pts)
  4.  Equatorial Guinea (0 pts)

Group stage[edit]

The top two teams of each group advance to the quarter-finals.

Tiebreakers

Teams are ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss), and if tied on points, the following tiebreaking criteria are applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings (Regulations Article 74):[14]

  1. Points in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  2. Goal difference in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  3. Goals scored in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  4. If more than two teams are tied, and after applying all head-to-head criteria above, a subset of teams are still tied, all head-to-head criteria above are reapplied exclusively to this subset of teams;
  5. Goal difference in all group matches;
  6. Goals scored in all group matches;
  7. Drawing of lots.

All times are local, WET (UTC±0).[25]

Group A[edit]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Morocco (H) 3 2 1 0 7 1 +6 7 Knockout stage
2  Sudan 3 2 1 0 3 1 +2 7
3  Guinea 3 1 0 2 3 5 −2 3
4  Mauritania 3 0 0 3 0 6 −6 0
Source: CAF
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
(H) Host.
Morocco 4–0 Mauritania
Report
Guinea 1–2 Sudan
Report

Morocco 3–1 Guinea
Report
Sudan 1–0 Mauritania
Report

Sudan 0–0 Morocco
Report
Mauritania 0–1 Guinea
Report

Group B[edit]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Zambia 3 2 1 0 6 2 +4 7 Knockout stage
2  Namibia 3 2 1 0 3 1 +2 7
3  Uganda 3 0 1 2 1 4 −3 1
4  Ivory Coast 3 0 1 2 0 3 −3 1
Source: CAF
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Ivory Coast 0–1 Namibia
Report
Zambia 3–1 Uganda
Report

Ivory Coast 0–2 Zambia
Report
Uganda 0–1 Namibia
Report

Uganda 0–0 Ivory Coast
Report
Namibia 1–1 Zambia
Report

Group C[edit]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Nigeria 3 2 1 0 4 1 +3 7 Knockout stage
2  Libya 3 2 0 1 4 1 +3 6
3  Rwanda 3 1 1 1 1 1 0 4
4  Equatorial Guinea 3 0 0 3 1 7 −6 0
Source: CAF
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Libya 3–0 Equatorial Guinea
Report
Nigeria 0–0 Rwanda
Report

Libya 0–1 Nigeria
Report
Rwanda 1–0 Equatorial Guinea
Report

Rwanda 0–1 Libya
Report
Equatorial Guinea 1–3 Nigeria
Report

Group D[edit]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Congo 3 2 1 0 3 0 +3 7 Knockout stage
2  Angola 3 1 2 0 1 0 +1 5
3  Burkina Faso 3 0 2 1 1 3 −2 2
4  Cameroon 3 0 1 2 1 3 −2 1
Source: CAF
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Angola 0–0 Burkina Faso
Report
Cameroon 0–1 Congo
Report

Angola 1–0 Cameroon
Report
Congo 2–0 Burkina Faso
Report

Congo 0–0 Angola
Report
Burkina Faso 1–1 Cameroon
Report

Knockout stage[edit]

In the knockout stage, extra time and penalty shoot-out are used to decide the winner if necessary, except for the third place match where penalty shoot-out (no extra time) is used to decide the winner if necessary (Regulations Article 75).[14]

Bracket[edit]

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
27 January – Casablanca
 
 
 Morocco2
 
31 January – Casablanca
 
 Namibia0
 
 Morocco (a.e.t.)3
 
28 January – Agadir
 
 Libya1
 
 Congo1 (3)
 
4 February – Casablanca
 
 Libya (p)1 (5)
 
 Morocco4
 
27 January – Marrakech
 
 Nigeria0
 
 Zambia0
 
31 January – Marrakech
 
 Sudan1
 
 Sudan0
 
28 January – Tangier
 
 Nigeria1 Third place
 
 Nigeria (a.e.t.)2
 
3 February – Marrakech
 
 Angola1
 
 Libya1 (2)
 
 
 Sudan (p)1 (4)
 

Quarter-finals[edit]

Morocco 2–0 Namibia
Report

Zambia 0–1 Sudan
Report

Nigeria 2–1 (a.e.t.) Angola
Report

Congo 1–1 (a.e.t.) Libya
Report
Penalties
3–5

Semi-finals[edit]

Morocco 3–1 (a.e.t.) Libya
Report

Sudan 0–1 Nigeria
Report

Third place match[edit]

Libya 1–1 Sudan
Report
Penalties
2–4

Final[edit]

Morocco 4–0 Nigeria
Report
Attendance: 45,000+

Goalscorers[edit]

9 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal

Awards[edit]

The following awards were given at the conclusion of the tournament:[26]

  • Total Man of the Tournament: Ayoub El Kaabi (Morocco)
  • Top scorer: Ayoub El Kaabi (Morocco) – 9 goals
  • Fair Play: Morocco
  • Team of the tournament:
    • Goalkeeper: Akram El Hadi (Sudan)
    • Defenders: Omer Suliman (Sudan), Stephen Eze (Nigeria), Badr Benoun (Morocco)
    • Midfielders: Solomon Ojo (Nigeria), Walid El Karti (Morocco), Salaheddine Saidi (Morocco), Zakaria Hadraf (Morocco), Abdulrahman Ramadhan (Libya)
    • Forwards: Ayoub El Kaabi (Morocco), Saleh Taher (Libya)
    • Substitutes: Anas Zniti (Morocco), Sand Masaud (Libya), Vladimir Antonio (Angola), Bader Hasan (Libya), Augustine Mulenga (Zambia), Saifeldin Bakhit (Sudan), Ismail El Haddad (Morocco)

Man of the match[edit]

Stage Team 1 Result Team 2 Man of the Match
First round of group stage matches
Group A Morocco  4–0  Mauritania Morocco Abdelilah Hafidi
Guinea  1–2  Sudan Sudan Saifeldin Malik Bakhit
Group B Ivory Coast  0–1  Namibia Namibia Vetunuavi Hambira
Zambia  3–1  Uganda Zambia Lazarous Kambole
Group C Libya  3–0  Equatorial Guinea Libya Saleh Al Taher
Nigeria  0–0  Rwanda Rwanda Djihad Bizimana
Group D Angola  0–0  Burkina Faso Angola
Cameroon  0–1  Congo Republic of the Congo Prestige Mboungou
Group A Morocco  3–1  Guinea Morocco Ayoub El Kaabi
Sudan  1–0  Mauritania Sudan Omer Suleiman Koko
Group B Ivory Coast  0–2  Zambia Zambia Augustine Mulenga
Uganda  0–1  Namibia Namibia Lloyd Kazapua
Group C Libya  0–1  Nigeria Nigeria Stephen Eze
Rwanda  1–0  Equatorial Guinea Rwanda Thierry Manzi
Group D Angola  1–0  Cameroon Angola
Congo  2–0  Burkina Faso Republic of the Congo Junior Makiesse
Group A Sudan  0–0  Morocco Sudan Akram El Hadi Salim
Mauritania  0–1  Guinea Guinea Ibrahima Sory Sankhon
Group B Uganda  0–0  Ivory Coast Ivory Coast Kouamé N'Guessan
Namibia  1–1  Zambia Namibia Teberius Lombard
Group C Rwanda  0–1  Libya Libya Elmutasem Abushnaf
Equatorial Guinea  1–3  Nigeria Nigeria Dayo Ojo
Group D Congo  0–0  Angola Republic of the Congo Francoeur Baron Kibamba
Burkina Faso  1–1  Cameroon Burkina Faso Wend-Panga Bambara
Knockout stage matches
Quarter-finals Morocco  2–0  Namibia Morocco Salaheddine Saidi
Zambia  0–1  Sudan Sudan Mohamed Hashim
Nigeria  2–1 (a.e.t.)  Angola Nigeria Ikechukwu Ezenwa
Congo  1–1 (a.e.t.)
(3–5 p)
 Libya Libya Abdulrahman Khalleefah
Semi-finals Morocco  3–1 (a.e.t.)  Libya Morocco Ayoub El Kaabi
Sudan  0–1  Nigeria Nigeria Gabriel Okechukwu
Third place match Libya  1–1
(2–4 p)
 Sudan Sudan Muhannad El Tahir
Final Morocco  4–0  Nigeria Morocco Zakaria Hadraf

Tournament team rankings[edit]

As per statistical convention in football, matches decided in extra time are counted as wins and losses, while matches decided by penalty shoot-outs are counted as draws.

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Final result
1  Morocco (H) 6 5 1 0 16 2 +14 16 Champions
2  Nigeria 6 4 1 1 7 6 +1 13 Runners-up
3  Sudan 6 3 2 1 5 3 +2 11 Third place
4  Libya 6 2 2 2 7 6 +1 8 Fourth place
5  Congo 4 2 2 0 4 1 +3 8 Eliminated in
quarter-finals
6  Zambia 4 2 1 1 6 3 +3 7
7  Namibia 4 2 1 1 3 3 0 7
8  Angola 4 1 2 1 2 2 0 5
9  Rwanda 3 1 1 1 1 1 0 4 Eliminated in
group stage
10  Guinea 3 1 0 2 3 5 −2 3
11  Burkina Faso 3 0 2 1 1 3 −2 2
12  Cameroon 3 0 1 2 1 3 −2 1
13  Uganda 3 0 1 2 1 4 −3 1
14  Ivory Coast 3 0 1 2 0 3 −3 1
15  Equatorial Guinea 3 0 0 3 1 7 −6 0
16  Mauritania 3 0 0 3 0 6 −6 0
Source:[citation needed]
(H) Host.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Kenya to Host 2018 Africa Nations Cup". allAfrica.com. Retrieved 7 February 2016.
  2. ^ "From Rwanda to Kenya". CAF. 9 February 2016.
  3. ^ "الكاف يختار المغرب لاستضافة كاس افريقيا للاعبين المحليين 2018 | الموقع الرسمي للجامعة الملكية المغربية لكرة القدم". www.frmf.ma. 15 October 2017. Retrieved 15 October 2017.
  4. ^ "Kenya to host 2018 African Nations Championship". www.nation.co.ke. Retrieved 7 February 2016.
  5. ^ "Kenya loses Chan hosting rights as Caf decides". Daily Nation. 23 September 2017. Retrieved 23 September 2017.
  6. ^ "TOTAL CHAN 2018: Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia and Morocco are bidding for the organisation". CAF. 1 October 2017.
  7. ^ "Morocco will host Total CHAN 2018". CAF. 15 October 2017.
  8. ^ "CAF Flash Magazine: Final 2016 Orange Confederation Cup" (PDF). CAF.
  9. ^ "Egypt qualify for Total CHAN, Morocco 2018". CAF. 15 October 2017.
  10. ^ "AFRICAN FOOTBALL Egypt declines CHAN 2018 invite". soka25east.com. 22 October 2017.
  11. ^ "Play-off Ethiopia - Rwanda for a place in Total Chan, Morocco 2018". CAF. 28 October 2017.
  12. ^ Jacob Gachanja (17 May 2016). "FKF reveals stadia plans ahead of CHAN 2018". futaa.com. Retrieved 29 August 2016.
  13. ^ "Kenya 'Loses' Rights to Host 2018 CHAN Due To Shoddy Stadiums". Nairobi Wire. Retrieved 29 August 2016.
  14. ^ a b c "Regulations of the African Nations Championship" (PDF). CAF.
  15. ^ "Squad lists revealed". CAF. 10 January 2018.
  16. ^ "Squad Lists" (PDF). CAF.
  17. ^ "Match Officials for Total CHAN Morocco 2018 announced". CAF. 26 December 2017.
  18. ^ "CHAN 2018 Appointed Referees" (PDF). CAF.
  19. ^ "CHAN kicks off as local African talent goes on show". CAF. 12 January 2018.
  20. ^ "Draw on November 17th in Rabat". CAF. 18 October 2017.
  21. ^ "Results and Fixtures of Total CHAN Morocco 2018 draw". CAF. 17 November 2017.
  22. ^ "Total CHAN 2018: Pots for final draw revealed". CAF. 15 November 2017.
  23. ^ "Procedure for the draw" (PDF). CAF. 15 November 2017.
  24. ^ "Ranking of qualified teams" (PDF). CAF. 15 November 2017.
  25. ^ "Fixtures of the Final Tournament". CAF.
  26. ^ "El Kaabi named Total man of the tournament". CAF. 6 February 2018.

External links[edit]