2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship
2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.png
Tournament details
Host country United States
Dates 4–17 October 2018[1]
Teams 8 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s) 3 (in 3 host cities)
Tournament statistics
Matches played 14
Goals scored 77 (5.5 per match)
Top scorer(s) Canada Adriana Leon
United States Alex Morgan
(6 goals each)
2014
2022
All statistics correct as of 14 October 2018.

The 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship is the 10th edition of the CONCACAF Women's Championship (also known as the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup or the CONCACAF Women's World Cup Qualifying Tournament), the quadrennial international football championship organised by CONCACAF for the women's national teams of the North, Central American and Caribbean region. Eight teams play in the tournament, which takes place from 4–17 October in the United States.[2]

The tournament serves as the CONCACAF qualifiers to the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France. The top three teams qualify for the World Cup, while the fourth-placed team advances to a play-off against the third-placed team from the South American confederation, CONMEBOL.[3] It also determines the CONCACAF teams playing at the 2019 Pan American Games women's football tournament in Lima.[4]

The United States are the defending champions.

Qualification[edit]

Regional qualification tournaments were held to determine the teams playing in the final tournament.

Qualified teams[edit]

The following eight teams qualified for the final tournament. Canada, Mexico, and the United States, as members of the North American Football Union, qualified automatically.

Team Qualification Appearance Previous best performances Previous FIFA Women's World Cup appearances FIFA ranking
at start of event
North American Zone (NAFU)
 Canada Automatic 9th Champions (1998, 2010) 6 5
 Mexico Automatic 9th Runners-up (1998, 2010) 3 24
 United States (title holders & hosts) Automatic 9th Champions (1991, 1993, 1994, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2014) 7 1
Central American Zone (UNCAF) qualified through Central American qualifying competition
 Costa Rica Group stage winners 7th Runners-up (2014) 1 34
 Panama Group stage runners-up 3rd Group stage (2002, 2006) 0 66
Caribbean Zone (CFU) qualified through Caribbean qualifying competition
 Jamaica Final round winners 6th Fourth place (2006) 0 64
 Trinidad and Tobago Final round runners-up 10th Third place (1991) 0 52
 Cuba Final round third place 1st Debut 0 88

Venues[edit]

The venues were announced by CONCACAF on 8 April 2018. Sahlen's Stadium and H-E-B Park will host the group stage matches, while Toyota Stadium will host the four matches in the knockout stage.[5]

Cary, North Carolina Edinburg, Texas Frisco, Texas
Sahlen's Stadium H-E-B Park Toyota Stadium
Capacity: 10,000 Capacity: 9,735 Capacity: 20,500
WakeMed Soccer Park 2013.jpg Pizza Hut Park.jpg

Draw[edit]

The draw for the final tournament was held on 4 September 2018, 10:00 EDT (UTC−4), at the Univision Studios in Miami.[6][7] The eight teams were drawn into two groups of four teams. They will be seeded into four pots. Pot 1 contained the United States, seeded in Group A, and Canada, seeded in Group B. The remaining six teams were allocated to Pots 2–4 based on the CONCACAF Women's Rankings. The two teams from UNCAF could not be drawn into the same group.

Pot 1 Pot 2 Pot 3 Pot 4

Squads[edit]

The provisional 35-player roster (4 must be goalkeepers) for each team was announced by CONCACAF on 10 September 2018.[8] The final 20-player roster (2 must be goalkeepers) for each team was announced by CONCACAF on 26 September 2018.[9] After the final 20-player roster was submitted, only injury-related changes would be submitted until 24 hours before each team's first match.[10]

Group stage[edit]

The top two teams of each group advance to the semi-finals.

Tiebreakers

Teams are ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss). The rankings of teams in each group are determined as follows (regulations Article 12.12):[10]

  1. points obtained in all group matches;
  2. goal difference in all group matches;
  3. number of goals scored in all group matches;

If two or more teams are equal on the basis of the above three criteria, their rankings are determined as followed:

  1. points obtained in the group matches between the teams concerned;
  2. goal difference in the group matches between the teams concerned;
  3. number of goals scored in the group matches between the teams concerned;
  4. fair play points in all group matches:
    • first yellow card: minus 1 point;
    • indirect red card (second yellow card): minus 3 points;
    • direct red card: minus 4 points;
    • yellow card and direct red card: minus 5 points;
  5. drawing of lots by CONCACAF.

Group A[edit]

All times are local, EDT (UTC−4).[11]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  United States (H) 3 3 0 0 18 0 +18 9 Knockout stage
2  Panama 3 2 0 1 5 5 0 6
3  Mexico 3 1 0 2 4 9 −5 3
4  Trinidad and Tobago 3 0 0 3 1 14 −13 0
Source: CONCACAF
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
(H) Host.
Trinidad and Tobago  0–3  Panama
Report
Referee: Odette Hamilton (Jamaica)
United States  6–0  Mexico
Report
Attendance: 5,404
Referee: Carol Anne Chénard (Canada)

Panama  0–5  United States
Report
Attendance: 7,532
Referee: Tatiana Guzmán (Nicaragua)
Mexico  4–1  Trinidad and Tobago
Report
Referee: Mirian León (El Salvador)

Panama  2–0  Mexico
Report
Trinidad and Tobago  0–7  United States
Report
Attendance: 3,996
Referee: Odette Hamilton (Jamaica)

Group B[edit]

All times are local, CDT (UTC−5).[11]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Canada 3 3 0 0 17 1 +16 9 Knockout stage
2  Jamaica 3 2 0 1 10 2 +8 6
3  Costa Rica 3 1 0 2 9 4 +5 3
4  Cuba 3 0 0 3 0 29 −29 0
Source: CONCACAF
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Costa Rica  8–0  Cuba
Report
Referee: Ekaterina Koroleva (United States)
Canada  2–0  Jamaica
Report
Referee: Francia González (Mexico)

Jamaica  1–0  Costa Rica
Report
Cuba  0–12  Canada
Report
Referee: Crystal Sobers (Trinidad and Tobago)

Cuba  0–9  Jamaica
Report
Referee: Crystal Sobers (Trinidad and Tobago)
Costa Rica  1–3  Canada
Report
Referee: Lucila Venegas (Mexico)

Knockout stage[edit]

In the semi-finals, if the match was level at the end of 90 minutes, no extra time would be played and the match would be decided by a penalty shoot-out. In the third place match and final, if the match is level at the end of 90 minutes, extra time is played, and if still tied after extra time, the match is decided by a penalty shoot-out (Regulations Article 12.14).[10]

Bracket[edit]

All times are local, CDT (UTC−5).[11]

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
14 October – Frisco
 
 
 Panama0
 
17 October – Frisco
 
 Canada7
 
 Canada
 
14 October – Frisco
 
 United States
 
 United States6
 
 
 Jamaica0
 
Third place play-off
 
 
17 October – Frisco
 
 
 Panama
 
 
 Jamaica

Semi-finals[edit]

Panama  0–7  Canada
Report
Referee: Odette Hamilton (Jamaica)

United States  6–0  Jamaica
Report
Attendance: 7,555
Referee: Francia González (Mexico)

Canada and United States qualified for 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. Panama and Jamaica entered into the third place play-off.

Third place play-off[edit]

Winner qualifies for 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. Loser enters CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off vs Argentina.

Panama  v  Jamaica
Report

Final[edit]

Canada  v  United States
Report

Goalscorers[edit]

There have been 77 goals scored in 14 matches, for an average of 5.5 goals per match. Players highlighted in bold are still active in the competition.

6 goals

4 goals

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

Qualification for international tournaments[edit]

Qualified teams for FIFA Women's World Cup[edit]

The following three teams from CONCACAF qualify for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. A fourth team will qualify if they win the play-off against the 2018 Copa América Femenina third-placed team, Argentina.

Team Qualified on Previous appearances in FIFA Women's World Cup1
 Canada 14 October 2018[12] 6 (1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015)
 United States 14 October 2018[12] 7 (1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015)
TBD 17 October 2018 0 (debut)

1 Bold indicates champions for that year. Italic indicates hosts for that year.

Qualified teams for Pan American Games[edit]

The tournament will be used to determine the four teams from CONCACAF which qualify for the 2019 Pan American Games women's football tournament. The top team from each of the three zones will qualify, with the fourth team to be determined by CONCACAF at a later date.[4]

Team Zone Qualified on Previous appearances in Pan American Games1
 Jamaica CFU 11 October 2018 1 (2007)
 Panama UNCAF 11 October 2018 1 (2007)
TBD NAFU 17 October 2018
TBD TBD TBD
1 Bold indicates champions for that year. Italic indicates hosts for that year.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2018 Concacaf Women's Championship to be Held in Cary, N.C., Edinburg, Texas & Frisco, Texas". US Soccer. 8 April 2018.
  2. ^ "United States Set to Host 2018 Concacaf Women's Championship in October". www.concacaf.com. 23 March 2018. Retrieved 23 March 2018.
  3. ^ "Circular #1565 – FIFA women's tournaments 2018–2019" (PDF). FIFA.com. 11 November 2016.
  4. ^ a b "Qualification System manual" (PDF). www.panamsports.org/. Pan American Sports Organization. 25 April 2018. Retrieved 25 April 2018.
  5. ^ "2018 Concacaf Women's Championship Final Rounds Set for Frisco, Texas, with Group Stages to Be Played in Cary, N.C. and Edinburg, Texas". CONCACAF.com. 8 April 2018.
  6. ^ "Draw Confirmed for the 2018 Concacaf Women's Championship". CONCACAF.com. 7 August 2018.
  7. ^ "Draw Reveals Groups for the 2018 Concacaf Women's Championship". CONCACAF.com. 4 September 2018.
  8. ^ "Provisional 35 Player Rosters Announced for the 2018 Concacaf Women's Championship". CONCACAF.com. 10 September 2018.
  9. ^ "Final 20-Player Rosters Announced for the 2018 Concacaf Women's Championship". CONCACAF.com. 26 September 2018.
  10. ^ a b c "2018 Concacaf Women's Championship Regulations" (PDF). CONCACAF.
  11. ^ a b c "Schedule" (PDF). CONCACAF.com.
  12. ^ a b "USA, Canada win passage to France". FIFA.com. 15 October 2018.

External links[edit]