2018 Democratic Socialists of America candidates election

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The following American politicians are affiliated with the Democratic Socialists of America. In the 2018 midterm elections, the national organization endorsed 42 candidates who ran for federal, state, and local offices in 20 states[1] while local chapters endorsed over 110 candidates.[2]

DSA drew national attention in 2018 with its dramatic surge in support following the upset victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over the ten-term Congressman and Democratic Caucus Chair Joe Crowley, who had been fourth in line for the Democratic leadership of the House of Representatives.[3]

DSA members elected to Congress in 2018 include Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Tlaib and incumbent Danny K. Davis. DSA members elected to state legislatures in 2018 include Hawaii Representative Amy Perruso, New York Senator Julia Salazar, and Pennsylvania Representatives Elizabeth Fiedler, Sara Innamorato, and Summer Lee.

Candidates[edit]

U.S. Senatorial candidates[edit]

Candidate State Primary date Primary result % General result %
Zak Ringelstein[4][1] Maine 6/12/2018 Won 67.7%[n 1] Defeated 10.4%
Sema Hernandez[5] Texas 3/6/2018 Defeated 23.7% Did not qualify N/A
Jensen Bohren[6][7] Mississippi 3/1/2018 Defeated 3.21% Did not qualify N/A

U.S. House candidates[edit]

Candidate District Primary date Primary result % General result %
Kaniela Ing Hawaii-1 8/11/2018 Defeated 6.4% Did not qualify N/A
Carlos Ramirez-Rosa[8] Illinois-4 3/20/2018 Withdrew N/A Did not qualify N/A
Danny K. Davis (incumbent)[9] Illinois-7 3/20/2018 Won 73.9% Won 87.6%
Rashida Tlaib Michigan-13 8/7/2018 Won 31.2% Won 84.2%
Rashida Tlaib Michigan-13 8/7/2018[n 2] Defeated 35.8% Did not qualify N/A
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez New York-14 6/26/2018 Won 56.7% Won 78.2%
Amy Vilela Nevada-4 6/12/2018 Defeated 9.2% Did not qualify N/A
Ali Khorasani Texas-2 3/6/2018 Defeated 7.5% Did not qualify N/A
Justin Snider Texas-6 3/6/2018 Defeated 6.9% Did not qualify N/A
Derrick Crowe Texas-21 3/6/2018 Defeated 23.1% Did not qualify N/A
Rick Treviño Texas-23 5/22/2018 Defeated 32.1%[n 3] Did not qualify N/A
James Singer Utah-3 6/26/2018 Uncontested N/A[n 4] Defeated 27.3%
Sarah Smith Washington-9 8/7/2018 Advanced 26.9%[n 5] Defeated 32.1%

Gubernatorial candidates[edit]

Candidate State Primary date Primary result % General result %
Constance N. Johnson Oklahoma 6/12/2018 Defeated 38.6% Did not qualify N/A
Tom Wakely Texas 3/6/2018 Defeated 3.4% Did not qualify N/A

State and local candidates[edit]

California[edit]

Jovanka Beckles won one of the top two spots in the primary, advancing to the general election for a State Assembly seat in the East Bay.[10][11] She was defeated with 46%[12] of the vote in the general election against Democratic political consultant Buffy Wicks on November 6, 2018.[13]

Colorado[edit]

In March 2018, 15 members of Denver Democratic Socialists of America were elected to the Denver Democratic Party Assembly, and managed to pass an amendment to the Denver Democratic Party platform calling for the economy to be "democratically owned and controlled in order to serve the needs of the many, not to make profits for the few" passed with the support of over 90% of the delegates. [14]

In the 2018 election, Denver Democratic Socialists of America endorsed Bernard Douthit for Colorado State Treasurer and Julie Gonzales for the Colorado State Senate. [15] Gonzales won her election in November, becoming the only Latina elected to the Colorado State Senate. [16]

District of Columbia[edit]

In September 2018, Metro. D.C. Democratic Socialists of America announced that they were endorsing Emily Gasoi for the D.C. State Board of Education and a group of 11 candidates for the District Advisory Neighborhood Commission. [17] Of these, Gasoi and four ANC candidates were elected: Dan Orlaskey, Matthew Sampson, Beau Finley, and Ryan Linehan. [18]

Hawaii[edit]

DSA member Amy Perruso[19] defeated Democratic incumbent Lei Learmont in the primary election for the 46th district in Hawaii House of Representatives.[20] She defeated Republican candidate John Miller in the general election on 6 November, 2018 with 66% of the vote.

Maryland[edit]

In January 2018, Metro D.C. Democratic Socialists of America endorsed four candidates in Montgomery County: Marc Elrich for County Executive, and Brandy Brooks, Danielle Meitiv, and Chris Wilhelm for County Council At-Large.[21] Two months later, MDC DSA endorsed Vaughn Stewart and Gabriel Acevero for the Maryland House of Delegates. [22] Elrich, Stewart, and Acevero subsequently won their respective elections. [18]

Montana[edit]

Jade Bahr and Amelia Marquez won primary elections for the State House with 68% and 65% of the vote in Montana's 50th and 52nd districts respectively.[23][24] Bahr won with 53% of the vote, while Marquez lost with 47% to the Republican candidate on November 6, 2018.[25]

New York[edit]

Julia Salazar won the Democratic primary, defeating incumbent state senator Martin Malave Dilan in New York's 18th senate district.[26][27] She won the seat uncontested in the general election on November 6, 2018.[28]

Pennsylvania[edit]

Sara Innamorato, Summer Lee, Elizabeth Fiedler and Kristin Seale won Democratic primary contests for seats in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, two of them defeating conservative male Democratic incumbents.[29][30][31][32] Innamorato, Lee and Fielder won their seats uncontested in the general election, while Seale was defeated by the Republican incumbent by less than 1,000 votes, with 49% of the vote on November 6, 2018.[33]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Won the primary unopposed.
  2. ^ Special election to fill in vacancy.
  3. ^ Advanced to the May 22 runoff with 17.5% of the primary vote.
  4. ^ No primary election was held, as Singer was the only Democrat that qualified for the ballot.
  5. ^ Advanced to the November general election by coming in second place in the top-two primary.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Peoples, Steve (21 July 2018). "Democratic socialism surging in the age of Trump, and a Maine candidate takes the leap". Portland Press Herald. Associated Press. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  2. ^ Aronoff, Kate (August 9, 2018). "Why the Democratic Socialists of America Won't Stop Growing: The inside story of DSA's dramatic ascent". In These Times. Retrieved August 12, 2018.
  3. ^ "Democratic Socialists of America Membership Surges After Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's Stunning Victory". The Daily Beast. Retrieved June 28, 2018.
  4. ^ Peoples, Steve (July 21, 2018). "Democratic socialism, with Kaniela Ing in the mix, surges in the age of Trump". Honolulu Star Advertiser. Retrieved July 22, 2018.
  5. ^ Downs, Ray (7 March 2018). "Sen. Ted Cruz to face Rep. Beto O'Rourke in Texas Senate race". UPI. Retrieved 28 September 2018.
  6. ^ "BOHREN, JENSEN MR - Candidate overview - FEC.gov". FEC.gov.
  7. ^ "Vote For Jensen". Twitter.com. MSDSA. June 3, 2018. Retrieved June 5, 2018.
  8. ^ "Congressional hopeful Ramirez-Rosa blasts 'corporate Democrats'". Chicago Tribune. 11 December 2017. Retrieved 28 September 2018.
  9. ^ "ADL Blasts U.S. Congressman for Lacking Courage to Condemn Farrakhan". Haaretz. JTA. 5 March 2018. Retrieved 28 September 2018.
  10. ^ "RELEASE: Jovanka Beckles Wins State Assembly Primary". EastBayDSA.org. June 14, 2018. Retrieved June 19, 2018.
  11. ^ "East Bay Primary Winners & Losers". 2018-06-07. Retrieved 2018-09-28.
  12. ^ "State Assembly District 15 - Districtwide Results". California Secretary of State. Nov 18, 2018. Retrieved Nov 19, 2018.
  13. ^ "Jovanka Beckles". Ballotpedia. Nov 8, 2018. Retrieved Nov 8, 2018.
  14. ^ Fleming, Sara (July 23, 2018). "As Tensions Rise in National Politics, Democratic Socialists Push Denver Chapter". West Word. Retrieved Nov 12, 2018.
  15. ^ Anderson, Dave (April 5, 2018). "Moving Left". Boulder Weekly. Retrieved Nov 12, 2018.
  16. ^ Vyse, Graham (Nov 9, 2018). "Democratic Socialists Racked Up Wins in States, But Their Influence Remains to Be Seen". Governing. Retrieved Nov 12, 2018.
  17. ^ Cohen, Matt (Oct 11, 2018). "D.C. Democratic Socialists Are Going Hyperlocal for the Upcoming General Election". Washington City Paper. Retrieved Nov 12, 2018.
  18. ^ a b Cohen, Matt (Nov 7, 2018). "Local Socialists Get Five D.C. Candidates in Office". Washington City Paper. Retrieved Nov 12, 2018.
  19. ^ Jilani, Zaid (Nov 8, 2018). "A "Dragon Ball Z" Composer Unseated a Texas Republican Senator, and Other Down-Ballot Democratic Victories You Didn't Hear About". The Intercept. Retrieved Nov 9, 2018.
  20. ^ "Amy Perruso". Ballotpedia. Nov 9, 2018. Retrieved Nov 9, 2018.
  21. ^ Pagnucco, Adam (Jan 23, 2018). "Democratic Socialists Endorse Elrich, Brooks, Meitiv, and Wilhelm". Seventh State. Retrieved Nov 12, 2018.
  22. ^ "The Washington Socialist for March 2018". Metro D.C. Democratic Socialists of America. March 9, 2018. Retrieved Nov 12, 2018.
  23. ^ "Montana Secretary of State". mtelectionresults.gov. Retrieved 2018-09-28.
  24. ^ "Billings DSA on Twitter".
  25. ^ "Montana Election Results". The New York Times. Nov 8, 2018. Retrieved Nov 8, 2018.
  26. ^ Nelsons, Libby; Beauchamp, Zach. "Julia Salazar overcomes controversy to notch another victory for democratic socialists". Vox. Retrieved 2018-09-14.
  27. ^ Gessen, Massa (14 September 2018). "A Triumphant Primary Night for Julia Salazar and the D.S.A. in Brooklyn". The New Yorker. Retrieved 28 September 2018.
  28. ^ "Julia Salazar". Ballotpedia. Nov 8, 2018. Retrieved Nov 8, 2018.
  29. ^ Eliza, Griswold (May 16, 2018). "A Democratic-Socialist Landslide in Pennsylvania". The New Yorker. Retrieved May 17, 2018.
  30. ^ Anapol, Avery (May 16, 2018). "Four socialist-backed candidates win Pennsylvania legislative primaries". The Hill. Retrieved May 17, 2018.
  31. ^ "Pittsburgh DSA Celebrates Success of Endorsed Candidates Sara Innamorato and Summer Lee". pghdsa.org. May 16, 2018. Retrieved May 17, 2018.
  32. ^ Krieg, Gregory (May 16, 2018). "Democratic Socialist women score big wins in Pennsylvania". CNN. Retrieved May 18, 2018.
  33. ^ "Pennsylvania Election Results". The New York Times. Nov 8, 2018. Retrieved Nov 8, 2018.