2018 French Grand Prix

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2018 French Grand Prix
Race 8 of 21 in the 2018 Formula One World Championship
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Circut Paul Ricard 2018 layout map.png
Layout of the Circuit Paul Ricard
Race details[1]
Date 24 June 2018
Official name Formula 1 Pirelli Grand Prix de France 2018
Location Circuit Paul Ricard
Le Castellet, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Course Permanent racing circuit
Course length 5.842 km (3.630 mi)
Distance 53 laps, 309.690 km (192.432 mi)
Pole position
Driver Mercedes
Time 1:30.029
Fastest lap
Driver Finland Valtteri Bottas Mercedes
Time 1:34.225 on lap 41 (lap record)
Podium
First Mercedes
Second Red Bull Racing-TAG Heuer
Third Ferrari

The 2018 French Grand Prix (formally known as the Formula 1 Pirelli Grand Prix de France 2018)[1] was a Formula One motor race that took place on 24 June 2018 at the Circuit Paul Ricard in Le Castellet, France.[1] The race was the eighth round of the 2018 FIA Formula One World Championship and marked the first time that the French Grand Prix has been run since 2008. It was the 87th running of the French Grand Prix, and the 59th time the event had been included as a round of the Formula One World Championship since the inception of the series in 1950.[2]

Coming into the event, Felipe Massa was the reigning race winner,[3] but he did not return to defend his win following his retirement from the sport at the end of the 2017 championship.[4] Ferrari driver Sebastian Vettel entered the race with a one-point lead over Lewis Hamilton in the World Drivers' Championship. In the World Constructors' Championship, Mercedes led Ferrari by seventeen points.

Report[edit]

Background[edit]

The race returned to the calendar for the first time since 2008, with Circuit Paul Ricard chosen as the venue. The circuit last hosted the French Grand Prix in 1990 before the event moved to the Circuit de Nevers Magny-Cours in 1991.[5] The race used the 5.842 km (3.630 mi) layout of the Circuit Paul Ricard for the first time. The layout includes a chicane on the Mistral straight as opposed to the 5.809 km (3.610 mi) circuit that was used nine times between 1971 and 1985.[note 1]

The race was run in June, filling a vacancy left by the Azerbaijan Grand Prix. The race in Azerbaijan was moved to an April date to avoid clashing with celebrations for centenary of the Azerbaijan Democratic Republic.[6]

Drag reduction system[edit]

The circuit featured two drag reduction system (DRS) zones. The first was located along the main straight, while the second was on the Mistral Straight on the approach to the chicane.[7]

Tyres[edit]

Tyre supplier Pirelli provided teams with the soft, supersoft and ultrasoft compounds of tyres. They reverted to their narrow tread compound following feedback from the teams in the wake of mid-season testing at the Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya.

Free practice[edit]

Lewis Hamilton set the fastest lap in the first free practice session, which was cut short by an accident involving Sauber driver Marcus Ericsson. Ericsson lost control of his Sauber C37 on the approach to Turn 11 and spun into the barrier on the outside of the corner. The car hit the tyre wall at an angle and subsequently caught fire. Ericsson was unharmed, but with two minutes remaining the session was abandoned and the damage to his car so extensive that he was unable to take part in the second free practice session. Several drivers experienced spins during the session, most notably at Turn 6 where an intermittent and gusty local wind caught the drivers unaware as they accelerated away from the apex of the corner. Unlike Ericsson, all of the drivers avoided contact with the wall courtesy of the circuit's unique, abrasive tarmac run-off areas designed to slow down cars that left the circuit.

Hamilton was fastest again in the second free practice session despite having his flying lap interrupted by another red flag. Sergio Pérez lost a wheel as he turned onto the Mistral Straight, prompting race officials to mount an investigation as to whether Force India had released Pérez from the pit lane with his car in an unsafe condition. The session was restarted once Pérez's car was cleared away.[8]

Classification[edit]

Qualifying[edit]

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Qualifying times Final
grid
Q1 Q2 Q3
1 44 United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 1:31.271 1:30.645 1:30.029 1
2 77 Finland Valtteri Bottas Mercedes 1:31.776 1:31.227 1:30.147 2
3 5 Germany Sebastian Vettel Ferrari 1:31.820 1:30.751 1:30.400 3
4 33 Netherlands Max Verstappen Red Bull Racing-TAG Heuer 1:31.531 1:30.818 1:30.705 4
5 3 Australia Daniel Ricciardo Red Bull Racing-TAG Heuer 1:31.910 1:31.538 1:30.895 5
6 7 Finland Kimi Räikkönen Ferrari 1:31.567 1:30.772 1:31.057 6
7 55 Spain Carlos Sainz Jr. Renault 1:32.394 1:32.016 1:32.126 7
8 16 Monaco Charles Leclerc Sauber-Ferrari 1:32.538 1:32.055 1:32.635 8
9 20 Denmark Kevin Magnussen Haas-Ferrari 1:32.169 1:31.510 1:32.930 9
10 8 France Romain Grosjean Haas-Ferrari 1:32.083 1:31.472 no time 10
11 31 France Esteban Ocon Force India-Mercedes 1:32.786 1:32.075 11
12 27 Germany Nico Hülkenberg Renault 1:32.949 1:32.115 12
13 11 Mexico Sergio Pérez Force India-Mercedes 1:32.692 1:32.454 13
14 10 France Pierre Gasly Scuderia Toro Rosso-Honda 1:32.447 1:32.460 14
15 9 Sweden Marcus Ericsson Sauber-Ferrari 1:32.804 1:32.820 15
16 14 Spain Fernando Alonso McLaren-Renault 1:32.976 16
17 28 New Zealand Brendon Hartley Scuderia Toro Rosso-Honda 1:33.025 201
18 2 Belgium Stoffel Vandoorne McLaren-Renault 1:33.162 17
19 35 Russia Sergey Sirotkin Williams-Mercedes 1:33.636 18
20 18 Canada Lance Stroll Williams-Mercedes 1:33.729 19
107% time: 1:37.659
Source:[9]
Notes
  • ^1  – Brendon Hartley received a 35-place grid penalty for exceeding his quota of power unit components.

Race[edit]

Pos. No. Driver Constructor Laps Time/Retired Grid Points
1 44 United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 53 1:30:11.385 1 25
2 33 Netherlands Max Verstappen Red Bull Racing-TAG Heuer 53 +7.090 4 18
3 7 Finland Kimi Räikkönen Ferrari 53 +25.888 6 15
4 3 Australia Daniel Ricciardo Red Bull Racing-TAG Heuer 53 +34.736 5 12
5 5 Germany Sebastian Vettel Ferrari 53 +1:01.935 3 10
6 20 Denmark Kevin Magnussen Haas-Ferrari 53 +1:19.364 9 8
7 77 Finland Valtteri Bottas Mercedes 53 +1:20.632 2 6
8 55 Spain Carlos Sainz Jr. Renault 53 +1:27.184 7 4
9 27 Germany Nico Hülkenberg Renault 53 +1:31.989 12 2
10 16 Monaco Charles Leclerc Sauber-Ferrari 53 +1:33.873 8 1
11 8 France Romain Grosjean Haas-Ferrari 52 +1 lap 10
12 2 Belgium Stoffel Vandoorne McLaren-Renault 52 +1 lap 17
13 9 Sweden Marcus Ericsson Sauber-Ferrari 52 +1 lap 15
14 28 New Zealand Brendon Hartley Scuderia Toro Rosso-Honda 52 +1 lap 20
15 35 Russia Sergey Sirotkin Williams-Mercedes 52 +1 lap1 18
162 14 Spain Fernando Alonso McLaren-Renault 50 Suspension 16
172 18 Canada Lance Stroll Williams-Mercedes 48 Puncture 19
Ret 11 Mexico Sergio Pérez Force India-Mercedes 27 Engine 13
Ret 31 France Esteban Ocon Force India-Mercedes 0 Collision 11
Ret 10 France Pierre Gasly Scuderia Toro Rosso-Honda 0 Collision 14
Source:[10]
Notes
  • ^1  – Sergey Sirotkin had 5 seconds added to his race time for driving unnecessarily slowly behind the safety car.
  • ^2  – Fernando Alonso and Lance Stroll retired from the race, but were classified as they completed more than 90% of the race distance.

Championship standings after the race[edit]

  • Note: Only the top five positions are included for both sets of standings.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The French Grand Prix used the short 3.812 km (2.369 mi) configuration of the Circuit Paul Ricard between 1986 and 1990.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Formula 1 Pirelli Grand Prix de France 2018". formula1.com. Formula One World Championship Limited. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  2. ^ "Grands Prix France". statsF1.com. Retrieved 2018-08-29.
  3. ^ Spurgeon, Brad (22 June 2008). "Felipe Massa, a Ferrari understudy, gets star role at Magny-Cours". The New York Times. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  4. ^ "Massa ends F1 career with 'great feeling'". GPUpdate.net. JHED Media BV. 27 November 2017. Archived from the original on 27 November 2017.
  5. ^ Benson, Andrew (5 December 2016). "French Grand Prix returns for 2018 after 10-year absence". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 1 September 2017.
  6. ^ "Ариф Рагимов: В 2018-м россиянам будет проще посетить гонки в Баку и Сочи" [Arif Ragimov: In 2018 it will be easy for Russians to visit both Baku and Sochi.]. autosport.com.ru (in Russian). Manuscript. 30 November 2017. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  7. ^ Noble, Jonathon (20 June 2018). "Paul Ricard circuit to feature two DRS zones for F1 French GP". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 20 June 2018.
  8. ^ "Lewis Hamilton tops French GP practice as Sergio Perez loses wheel". BBC Sport. 22 June 2018.
  9. ^ "Formula 1 Pirelli Grand Prix de France 2018 – Qualifying". Formula1.com. Formula One World Championship Limited. 23 June 2018. Retrieved 23 June 2018.
  10. ^ "Formula 1 Pirelli Grand Prix de France 2018 – Race Result". Formula1.com. Formula One World Championship Limited. 24 June 2018. Retrieved 24 June 2018.

External links[edit]


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2008 French Grand Prix
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2019 French Grand Prix