2018 IIHF World Championship

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2018 IIHF World Championship
2018 IIHF World Championship.png
Tournament details
Host country  Denmark
Dates 4–20 May
Teams 16
Venue(s) (in 2 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Gold medal blank.svg  Sweden (11th title)
Runner-up Silver medal blank.svg   Switzerland
Third place Bronze medal blank.svg  United States
Fourth place  Canada
Tournament statistics
Matches played 64
Goals scored 384 (6 per match)
Attendance 520,481 (8,133 per match)
Scoring leader(s) United States Patrick Kane
(20 points)
MVP United States Patrick Kane
2017
2019

The 2018 IIHF World Championship was an international ice hockey tournament hosted by the Denmark cities of Copenhagen and Herning. The IIHF announced the winning bid on 23 May 2014.[1][2] South Korea made its debut at the World Championship, having played in the lower divisions previously.[3]

Sweden won their second consecutive and eleventh overall title after defeating Switzerland in the final.[4]

The official mascot of the tournament was a duck, inspired by the Danish writer and poet Hans Christian Andersen's fairytale about The Ugly Duckling.[5]

Bids[edit]

There were two bids to host this championship.[6]

Denmark is the only top-ranked IIHF country that has never hosted the tournament. The proposed arenas were the Royal Arena in Copenhagen and the Jyske Bank Boxen in Herning.[2] Both arenas have a capacity of around 12,000 for hockey games.[7]
Latvia hosted the IIHF World Championship in 2006. The proposed arenas were Arena Riga, and a secondary venue to be built.[2]

The decision was announced on 23 May 2014. The final tally was 95-12 in favor of Denmark.[1][2]

Venues[edit]

Copenhagen Herning
Royal Arena
Capacity: 12,500
Jyske Bank Boxen
Capacity: 12,000
RoyalArena 20170811 N8B0024 (36517811566).jpg Jyske Bank Boxen.jpg

Qualified teams[edit]

* = Automatic qualifier after a top 14 placement at the 2017 IIHF World Championship
^ = Qualified through winning a promotion at the 2017 IIHF World Championship Division I
= Qualified as host.

Seeding[edit]

The seeding in the preliminary round was based on the 2017 IIHF World Ranking, which ended at the conclusion of the 2017 IIHF World Championship.[8]

Denmark and Sweden played in separate groups, Denmark at the Jyske Bank Boxen while Sweden at the Royal Arena in Copenhagen.[9]

1 Denmark and France swapped sides so Denmark would not be in the same group as Sweden.

Rosters[edit]

Each team's roster consisted of at least 15 skaters (forwards, and defencemen) and 2 goaltenders, and at most 22 skaters and 3 goaltenders. All 16 participating nations, through the confirmation of their respective national associations, had to submit a "Long List" no later than two weeks before the tournament, and a final roster by the Passport Control meeting prior to the start of tournament.

Officials[edit]

16 referees and linesman were announced on 21 March 2018.[10][11]

Referees Linesmen

Preliminary round[edit]

The schedule was released on 8 August 2017.[12]

Group A[edit]

Pos Team Pld W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts Qualification or relegation
1  Sweden 7 6 1 0 0 31 9 +22 20 Quarterfinals
2  Russia 7 5 0 1 1 32 10 +22 16
3  Czech Republic 7 3 3 0 1 27 15 +12 15
4   Switzerland 7 3 1 1 2 25 19 +6 12
5  Slovakia 7 3 0 2 2 19 20 −1 11
6  France 7 2 0 0 5 13 29 −16 6
7  Austria 7 1 0 1 5 13 30 −17 4
8  Belarus (R) 7 0 0 0 7 8 36 −28 0 Relegation to 2019 Division I A[a]
Source: IIHF
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) head-to-head points; 3) head-to-head goal difference; 4) head-to-head number of goals scored; 5) result against closest best-ranked team outside tied teams; 6) result against second-best ranked team outside tied teams; 7) seeding before tournament.
(R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. ^ The rules state that "the bottom ranked two teams will be relegated" and the 2019 hosts (Slovakia) cannot be relegated by rule.[13]
4 May 2018
Russia  7–0  France
Sweden  5–0  Belarus
5 May 2018
Switzerland   3–2 (OT)  Austria
France  6–2  Belarus
Czech Republic  3–2 (OT)  Slovakia
6 May 2018
Austria  0–7  Russia
Sweden  3–2  Czech Republic
Slovakia  0–2   Switzerland
7 May 2018
Belarus  0–6  Russia
Sweden  4–0  France
8 May 2018
Austria  2–4  Slovakia
Czech Republic  5–4 (GWS)   Switzerland
9 May 2018
Switzerland   5–2  Belarus
Sweden  7–0  Austria
10 May 2018
Slovakia  3–1  France
Czech Republic  4–3 (OT)  Russia
11 May 2018
France  5–2  Austria
Belarus  0–3  Czech Republic
12 May 2018
Slovakia  3–4 (OT)  Sweden
Austria  4–0  Belarus
Russia  4–3   Switzerland
13 May 2018
France  0–6  Czech Republic
Switzerland   3–5  Sweden
14 May 2018
Russia  4–0  Slovakia
Czech Republic  4–3  Austria
15 May 2018
Switzerland   5–1  France
Belarus  4–7  Slovakia
Russia  1–3  Sweden

Group B[edit]

Pos Team Pld W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts Qualification or relegation
1  Finland 7 5 0 1 1 38 11 +27 16[a] Quarterfinals
2  United States 7 4 2 0 1 39 16 +23 16[a]
3  Canada 7 4 1 1 1 32 12 +20 15
4  Latvia 7 3 1 2 1 16 16 0 13
5  Denmark (H) 7 3 1 0 3 13 17 −4 11
6  Germany 7 1 1 2 3 16 20 −4 7
7  Norway 7 1 1 1 4 13 31 −18 6
8  South Korea (R) 7 0 0 0 7 4 48 −44 0 Relegation to 2019 Division I A
Source: IIHF
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) head-to-head points; 3) head-to-head goal difference; 4) head-to-head number of goals scored; 5) result against closest best-ranked team outside tied teams; 6) result against second-best ranked team outside tied teams; 7) seeding before tournament.
(H) Host; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Finland 6–2 United States
4 May 2018
United States  5–4 (GWS)  Canada
Germany  2–3 (GWS)  Denmark
5 May 2018
Norway  2–3 (OT)  Latvia
Finland  8–1  South Korea
Denmark  0–4  United States
6 May 2018
South Korea  0–10  Canada
Germany  4–5 (GWS)  Norway
Latvia  1–8  Finland
7 May 2018
United States  3–0  Germany
Canada  7–1  Denmark
8 May 2018
South Korea  0–5  Latvia
Finland  7–0  Norway
9 May 2018
Germany  6–1  South Korea
Finland  2–3  Denmark
10 May 2018
United States  3–2 (OT)  Latvia
Norway  0–5  Canada
11 May 2018
Denmark  3–0  Norway
United States  13–1  South Korea
12 May 2018
Latvia  3–1  Germany
Denmark  3–1  South Korea
Canada  1–5  Finland
13 May 2018
Norway  3–9  United States
Germany  3–2 (OT)  Finland
14 May 2018
South Korea  0–3  Norway
Canada  2–1 (OT)  Latvia
15 May 2018
Finland  6–2  United States
Canada  3–0  Germany
Latvia  1–0  Denmark

Playoff round[edit]

 
Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
 
                   
 
17 May
 
 
 Sweden 3
 
19 May
 
 Latvia 2
 
 Sweden 6
 
17 May
 
 United States 0
 
 United States 3
 
20 May
 
 Czech Republic 2
 
 Sweden (GWS) 3
 
17 May
 
  Switzerland 2
 
 Russia 4
 
19 May
 
 Canada (OT) 5
 
 Canada 2
 
17 May
 
  Switzerland 3 Third place
 
 Finland 2
 
20 May
 
  Switzerland 3
 
 United States 4
 
 
 Canada 1
 

Final[edit]

20 May 2018
20:15 (UTC+2)
Sweden  3–2 GWS
(1–1, 1–1, 0–0)
(OT: 0–0)
(SO: 1–0)
  Switzerland Royal Arena, Copenhagen
Attendance: 12,490

Final ranking and statistics[edit]

Final ranking[edit]

Pos Grp Team Pld W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts Final result
1 A  Sweden 10 8 2 0 0 43 13 +30 28 Champions
2 A   Switzerland 10 5 1 2 2 33 26 +7 19 Runners-up
3 B  United States 10 6 2 0 2 46 25 +21 22 Third place
4 B  Canada 10 4 2 1 3 40 23 +17 17 Fourth place
5 B  Finland 8 5 0 1 2 40 14 +26 16 Eliminated in
Quarter-finals
6 A  Russia 8 5 0 2 1 36 15 +21 17
7 A  Czech Republic 8 3 3 0 2 29 18 +11 15
8 B  Latvia 8 3 1 2 2 18 19 −1 13
9 A  Slovakia 7 3 0 2 2 19 20 −1 11 Eliminated in
Group stage
10 B  Denmark (H) 7 3 1 0 3 13 17 −4 11
11 B  Germany 7 1 1 2 3 16 20 −4 7
12 A  France 7 2 0 0 5 13 29 −16 6
13 B  Norway 7 1 1 1 4 13 31 −18 6
14 A  Austria 7 1 0 1 5 13 30 −17 4
15 A  Belarus 7 0 0 0 7 8 36 −28 0 2019 IIHF World Championship Division I
16 B  South Korea 7 0 0 0 7 4 48 −44 0
Source: IIHF.com
Rules for classification: 1) position in the group; 2) number of points; 3) goal difference; 4) goals scored; 5) seeding before tournament.[14][15]
(H) Host.

Scoring leaders[edit]

List shows the top skaters sorted by points, then goals.

Player GP G A Pts +/− PIM POS
United States Patrick Kane 10 8 12 20 −2 0 F
Finland Sebastian Aho 8 9 9 18 +15 2 F
Canada Connor McDavid 10 5 12 17 +6 10 F
Sweden Rickard Rakell 10 6 8 14 +7 6 F
Finland Teuvo Teräväinen 8 5 9 14 +14 8 F
United States Cam Atkinson 10 7 4 11 −3 2 F
Sweden Mika Zibanejad 10 6 5 11 +10 0 F
Finland Mikko Rantanen 8 5 6 11 +1 6 F
Sweden Mattias Janmark 10 4 6 10 +8 8 F
United States Chris Kreider 10 4 6 10 +7 2 F

GP = Games played; G = Goals; A = Assists; Pts = Points; +/− = Plus/Minus; PIM = Penalties in Minutes; POS = Position
Source: IIHF.com

Goaltending leaders[edit]

Only the top five goaltenders, based on save percentage, who have played at least 40% of their team's minutes, are included in this list.

Player TOI GA GAA SA Sv% SO
Sweden Anders Nilsson 440:00 8 1.09 174 95.40 3
Denmark Frederik Andersen 362:56 10 1.65 178 94.38 1
Russia Igor Shestyorkin 204:57 5 1.46 86 94.19 2
Latvia Elvis Merzļikins 360:35 9 1.50 151 94.04 2
Finland Harri Säteri 298:31 7 1.41 114 93.86 1

TOI = Time on Ice (minutes:seconds); SA = Shots Against; GA = Goals Against; GAA = Goals Against Average; Sv% = Save Percentage; SO = Shutouts
Source: IIHF.com

Awards[edit]

Source: IIHF.com

Source: IIHF.com

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Denmark to host Ice Hockey World Championship in 2018
  2. ^ a b c d To Denmark in 2018
  3. ^ Merk, Martin (29 April 2017). "Korea Promoted!". IIHF.com. Retrieved 29 April 2017. 
  4. ^ "Tre Kronor golden again!". IIHF.com. 20 May 2018. Retrieved 20 May 2018. 
  5. ^ http://2018.iihfworlds.com/en/news/help-us-name-the-mascot/
  6. ^ "Two applicants for 2018 : Denmark, Latvia vying to host men's World Championship". IIHF. 20 September 2013. Retrieved 9 April 2014. 
  7. ^ "IIHF impressed on site visit to Denmark". denmark2018. 9 March 2014. Archived from the original on 13 April 2014. Retrieved 9 April 2014. 
  8. ^ Groups for 2018
  9. ^ "7 events for 2018 IIHF Ice Hockey World Championship". denmark2018. Retrieved 16 May 2017. 
  10. ^ "On-ice officials named". iihf.com. 21 March 2018. 
  11. ^ Assignments
  12. ^ "Worlds schedule released". iihfworlds.com. 8 August 2017. 
  13. ^ "Statutes and Bylaws (701.3)" (PDF). iihf.com. 10 September 2015. 
  14. ^ 2018 tournament rules
  15. ^ IIHF Sport Regulations (pg4)

External links[edit]