2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Nevada

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2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Nevada

← 2016 November 6, 2018 (2018-11-06) 2020 →

All four Nevada seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 3 1
Seats won 3 1
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 491,272 439,727
Percentage 51.13% 45.77%
Swing Increase4.02% Decrease0.42%

2018 U.S. House elections in Nevada.svg
  Democratic hold
  Republican hold

The 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Nevada were held on November 6, 2018, to elect the four U.S. Representatives from the State of Nevada, one from each of the state's four congressional districts. The elections coincided with the Nevada gubernatorial election, as well as other elections to the United States House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. Primary elections were held on June 12, 2018.[1]

District 1[edit]

Nevada's 1st congressional district occupies the southeastern half of Nevada's largest city, Las Vegas, as well as parts of North Las Vegas and parts of unincorporated Clark County. The incumbent is Democrat Dina Titus, who has represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 3rd district from 2009 to 2011. She was reelected to a third term with 62% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dina Titus (incumbent) 20,897 78.7
Democratic Reuben D'Silva 5,659 21.3
Total votes 26,556 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Joyce Bentley 6,444 55.2
Republican Fred Horne 5,235 44.8
Total votes 11,679 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Robert Van Strawder (L)
Musicians

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Dina
Titus (D)
Joyce
Bentley (R)
Undecided
Emerson College November 1–4, 2018 238 ± 6.6% 58% 28% 7%
Emerson College October 10–12, 2018 121 ± 9.2% 50% 20% 26%

Results[edit]

Nevada's 1st congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dina Titus (incumbent) 100,707 66.2
Republican Joyce Bentley 46,978 30.9
Independent American Dan Garfield 2,454 1.6
Libertarian Robert Van Strawder Jr. 2,062 1.3
Total votes 152,201 100.0
Democratic hold

District 2[edit]

Nevada's 2nd congressional district includes the northern third of the state. It includes most of Douglas County and Lyon County, all of Churchill County, Elko County, Eureka County, Humboldt County, Pershing County and Washoe County, as well as the state capital, Carson City. The largest city in the district is Reno, the state's second largest city. Although the district appears rural, its politics are dominated by Reno and Carson City, which combined cast over 85 percent of the district's vote. The incumbent is Republican Mark Amodei, who has represented the district since 2011. He was reelected to a third full term with 58% of the vote in 2016. Amodei ran for reelection[3] and faced a primary challenge from Sharron Angle.[4] Clint Koble, former Nevada State Executive Director of the Farm Service Agency of the USDA, announced he was running for the Democratic nomination in November 2017, winning the nomination and losing to Amodei in the general election.[5]

Democratic primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Clint Koble 9,451 26.1
Democratic Patrick Fogarty 8,614 23.8
Democratic Rick Shepherd 7,696 21.3
Democratic Vance Alm 4,781 13.2
Democratic Jesse Hurley 2,907 8.0
Democratic Jack Schofield Jr. 2,711 7.5
Total votes 36,160 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Amodei (incumbent) 42,335 71.7
Republican Sharron Angle 10,829 18.3
Republican Joel Beck 5,002 8.5
Republican Ian Luetkehans 881 1.5
Total votes 59,047 100.0

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Mark
Amodei (R)
Clint
Koble (D)
Undecided
Emerson College November 1–4, 2018 365 ± 5.3% 58% 37% 6%
Emerson College October 10–12, 2018 169 ± 7.8% 23% 16% 61%

Results[edit]

Nevada's 2nd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Amodei (incumbent) 167,435 58.2
Democratic Clint Koble 120,102 41.8
Total votes 287,537 100.0
Republican hold

District 3[edit]

The 3rd congressional district occupies the area south of Las Vegas, including Henderson, and most of unincorporated Clark County and was created after the 2000 United States Census. The incumbent is Democrat Jacky Rosen, who has represented the district since 2017. She was elected with 47% of the vote in 2016 to replace Republican U.S. Representative Joe Heck, who ran for the U.S. Senate and lost. She is not running for reelection, instead challenging U.S. Senator Dean Heller.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
  • Susie Lee, philanthropist, president of the board of the Communities In Schools of Nevada[6]
  • Steve Schiffman, attorney at law, former USAID Foreign Service Officer and chair of the Partnership for Judicial Progress
  • Jack Love, insurance agent
Potential
Declined

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Susie Lee 25,474 66.9
Democratic Michael Weiss 3,115 8.2
Democratic Eric Stoltz 2,758 7.2
Democratic Jack Love 2,208 5.8
Democratic Richard Hart 1,847 4.9
Democratic Steve Schiffman 1,338 3.5
Democratic Guy Pinjuv 1,331 3.5
Total votes 38,071 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Declined
Withdrew

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Danny Tarkanian 15,257 44.1
Republican Michelle Mortensen 8,491 24.6
Republican Scott Hammond 5,804 16.8
Republican David McKeon 1,698 4.9
Republican Annette Teijeiro 1,225 3.5
Republican Patrick Carter 942 2.7
Republican Stephanie Jones 450 1.3
Republican Eddie Hamilton 360 1.0
Republican Thomas La Croix 345 1.0
Total votes 34,572 100.0

General election[edit]

Debates[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Susie Lee (D)
U.S. President
U.S. Governor
Danny Tarkanian (R)
U.S. President

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Susie
Lee (D)
Danny
Tarkanian (R)
Undecided
Emerson College November 1–4, 2018 332 ± 5.6% 51% 44% 3%
Emerson College October 10–12, 2018 178 ± 7.6% 41% 39% 18%

Results[edit]

Nevada's 3rd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Susie Lee 148,501 51.9
Republican Danny Tarkanian 122,566 42.8
Libertarian Steve Brown 4,555 1.6
Independent David Goossen 3,627 1.3
Independent American Harry Vickers 3,481 1.2
Independent Gil Eisner 1,887 0.7
Independent Tony Gumina 1,551 0.5
Total votes 286,168 100.0
Democratic hold

District 4[edit]

The 4th congressional district was created as a result of the 2010 United States Census.[19] Located in the central portion of the state, it includes most of northern Clark County, parts of Lyon County, and all of Esmeralda County, Lincoln County, Mineral County, Nye County and White Pine County. More than four-fifths of the district's population lives in Clark County.

The incumbent is Democrat Ruben Kihuen, who has represented the district since January 2017. He was elected by defeating incumbent Republican U.S. Representative Cresent Hardy with 49% of the vote in 2016. In December 2017, Kihuen announced that he would not seek reelection in 2018 following allegations of sexual harassment.[20]

Democratic primary[edit]

After incumbent Representative Kihuen announced he would not seek reelection in 2018, the only candidate filed to run against him in the primaries was Amy Vilela.

Former U.S. Representative from this district Steven Horsford, who was defeated in the 2014 election, as well as Nevada Legislator Pat Spearman, later announced their plans to run for the Democratic nomination for the seat several months later, due to the opportunity brought about by Kihuen's announcement.

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Declined

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Steven Horsford 22,698 61.7
Democratic Patricia Spearman 5,607 15.2
Democratic Amy Vilela 3,388 9.2
Democratic Allison Stephens 2,215 6.0
Democratic John Anzalone 2,132 5.8
Democratic Sid Zeller 734 2.0
Total votes 36,774 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

The Republican primary featured six candidates. The early frontrunner was Cresent Hardy who faced questions about his hiring of Benjamin Sparks, a Las Vegas political adviser who allegedly sexually enslaved and battered his ex-fiancée.[26]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Withdrew
  • Stavros Anthony, Las Vegas councilman (dropped out due to health reasons)[29]
Declined

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Cresent Hardy 15,252 47.4
Republican David Gibbs 6,098 19.0
Republican Bill Townsend 3,659 11.4
Republican Kenneth Wegner 3,625 11.3
Republican Jeff Miller 2,560 8.0
Republican Mike Monroe 971 3.0
Total votes 32,165 100.0

Libertarian primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Potential
  • Steve Brown, Libertarian nominee for the U.S. House of Representatives in NV-04 in 2014 and 2016 and candidate for the U.S. Senate in Nevada in 2012

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Cresent Hardy (R)
Organizations
  • Las Vegas Asian Chamber of Commerce[31]
Steven Horsford (D)
U.S. President
U.S. Senator

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Steven
Horsford (D)
Cresent
Hardy (R)
Other Undecided
Emerson College November 1–4, 2018 263 ± 6.3% 48% 44% 3%
Emerson College October 10–12, 2018 157 ± 8.1% 36% 34% 23%
Moore Information (R) October 3–8, 2018 400 ± 5.0% 37% 41% 10%[33] 13%
Moore Information (R-Hardy) August 4–7, 2018 400 ± 5.0% 41% 41% 17%
Global Strategy Group (D-Horsford) July 17–22, 2018 500 ± 4.4% 49% 40% 11%
DCCC (D) January 5–9, 2018 400 42% 37%

Results[edit]

Nevada's 4th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Steven Horsford 121,962 51.9
Republican Cresent Hardy 102,748 43.8
Independent American Warren Markowitz 3,180 1.3
Independent Rodney Smith 2,733 1.2
Libertarian Greg Luckner 2,213 0.9
Independent Dean McGonigle 2,032 0.9
Total votes 234,868 100.0
Democratic hold

References[edit]

  1. ^ staff, News 3. "Nevada candidate filing begins Monday; primary is June 12". Retrieved June 6, 2018.
  2. ^ paulie (September 25, 2018). "Digital Underground's Shock G endorses Robert Strawder, Libertarian for US House (NV-1)".
  3. ^ Hagar, Ray (May 31, 2017). "Dismissing statewide bid, Amodei will seek re-election to Congress". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved May 31, 2017.
  4. ^ Richardson, Seth A. (March 21, 2017). "Sharron Angle announces bid for Congress". Reno Gazette-Journal. Retrieved March 21, 2017.
  5. ^ "Democrat Koble running for Congress for NV District 2". KOLO8. November 13, 2017. Retrieved January 20, 2018.
  6. ^ @SusieLeeNV (September 14, 2017). "Hey Nevada, it's official: I'm running to represent #NV03 in Congress. But I can't do it alone! Join us here: www.susieleeforcongress.com" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  7. ^ a b c d e f Bowman, Bridget (July 17, 2017). "Republicans Seeing Red in Newly Open Nevada Seat". Roll Call. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  8. ^ Messerly, Megan (July 6, 2017). "Rosen officially announces Senate bid, says Reid encouraged her to run". The Nevada Independent. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  9. ^ Lauer, Rob (March 29, 2017). "Dave McKeon Eyeing Run for Congressional District 3". 360Daily.net. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  10. ^ Tarkanian, Lee lead pack in fundraising for Nevada congressional races, Las Vegas Review-Journal, Colton Lochhead and Ramona Giwargis, April 16, 2018. Retrieved June 25, 2018.
  11. ^ "Tarkanian will drop Heller primary challenge at Trump's urging". Retrieved June 6, 2018.
  12. ^ Lochhead, Colton (July 6, 2017). "Rosen's Senate bid the first 2018 political domino to fall in Nevada". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  13. ^ Garcia, Eric (July 26, 2017). "Former Rep. Cresent Hardy Passes on 2018 Run". Roll Call. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  14. ^ Valley, Jackie (August 2, 2017). "Without divulging his next move, Roberson calls for Republican unity heading into 2018". The Nevada Independent. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  15. ^ Lochhead, Colton (March 22, 2018). "Republican Victoria Seaman withdraws from congressional race". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  16. ^ a b Barack Obama [@BarackObama] (August 1, 2018). "Today I'm proud to endorse such a wide and impressive array of Democratic candidates – leaders as diverse, patriotic, and big-hearted as the America they're running to represent:" (Tweet). Retrieved August 1, 2018 – via Twitter.
  17. ^ Susie Lee. "Great voter registration launch with Gov. @JayInslee! #TeamSusie is ready to prove that we have the best organizers and volunteers in the state. #NV03". Twitter.
  18. ^ Donald Trump [@realDonaldTrump] (September 15, 2018). ".@DannyTarkanian of Nevada is a great friend who supports the Trump Agenda. He is Strong on Crime, the Border and our under siege 2nd Amendment. Danny Loves our Military and our Vets. He has my total and complete Endorsement!" (Tweet). Retrieved September 15, 2018 – via Twitter.
  19. ^ "Census 2010 shows Red states gaining congressional districts". Washington Post. Retrieved December 21, 2010.
  20. ^ a b Viebeck, Elise (December 16, 2017). "Rep. Ruben Kihuen won't seek reelection amid sexual harassment allegations". Washington Post. Washington DC. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  21. ^ "Spearman Jumping into Race to Replace Kihuen; Ex-Rep. Horsford, Nlv Mayor Lee and Regent Stephens Considering Bids". Mineral County Independent News. January 18, 2018.
  22. ^ "Former Democratic Rep. Steven Horsford announces run for his old House seat". Retrieved June 6, 2018.
  23. ^ a b "Spearman joins Nevada race to replace Kihuen". January 5, 2018. Retrieved June 6, 2018.
  24. ^ https://justicedemocrats.com. "Justice Democrats - Candidates". now.justicedemocrats.com. Archived from the original on June 27, 2018. Retrieved June 6, 2018.
  25. ^ "Will harassment scandal mean 'political oblivion' for Ruben Kihuen?". December 5, 2017. Retrieved June 6, 2018.
  26. ^ . April 4, 2018 https://www.reviewjournal.com/news/politics-and-government/nevada/woman-says-las-vegas-gop-campaign-adviser-made-her-his-sex-slave/. Retrieved June 10, 2018. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  27. ^ Rindels, Michelle (January 18, 2018). "Republican former Rep. Cresent Hardy files paperwork to join race for his old House seat". The Nevada Independent.
  28. ^ Cook, Cynthia (March 15, 2018). PRNewswire https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/entrepreneur-and-philanthropist-bill-townsend-announces-his-candidacy-for-the-us-house-of-representatives-in-nevadas-4th-congressional-district-300614490.html. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  29. ^ "Citing health, Stavros Anthony ends Nevada congressional bid". January 15, 2018. Retrieved June 6, 2018.
  30. ^ Schneider, Elena (March 23, 2017). "Judgment day on health care". Politico. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  31. ^ Cresent Hardy. "Proud and honored to have the support of @LasVegasACC — can't wait to work with you as your Congressman! #NV04". Twitter.
  32. ^ Brian Schatz. "I'm giving to @StevenHorsford please feel free to join me and send help too. Thank you". Twitter.
  33. ^ Gregg Luckner (L) with 2%, Warren Markowitz (IA) with 2%, Dean McGonigle (I) with 1%, Rodney Smith (I) with 1%, and "None" with 4%

External links[edit]

Official campaign websites of first district candidates
Official campaign websites of second district candidates
Official campaign websites of third district candidates
Official campaign websites of fourth district candidates