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2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Pennsylvania

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2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Pennsylvania

← 2016 November 6, 2018 (2018-11-06) 2020 →

All 18 Pennsylvania seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 5 13
Seats before 6 12
Seats won 9 9
Seat change Increase 3 Decrease 3
Popular vote 2,712,665 2,206,260
Percentage 55.03% 44.75%
Swing Increase 9.33% Decrease 9.16%

The 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Pennsylvania were held on November 6, 2018, to elect the 18 U.S. representatives from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, one from each of the state's 18 congressional districts.

The elections coincided with the 2018 gubernatorial election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections.

In January 2018, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court struck down the state's congressional map, ruling it had been unfairly gerrymandered to favor Republicans. New maps were subsequently adopted in February 2018.[1][2]

The 2018 general election saw the Democrats gain four seats and the Republicans gain one seat, for a Democratic net gain of three seats, changing the state's representation from 12 to 6 Republican to a 9–9 tie. In addition, Pennsylvanians in several districts elected female candidates to the U.S. House, thus ending four years of all-male Congressional representation in the state.[3]

Redistricting[edit]

Court-mandated districts for 2018 elections
Congressional district map (2013–2018)

In January 2018, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court struck down the state's congressional map, ruling it had been unfairly gerrymandered to favor Republicans.[4][5] New maps were subsequently adopted in February 2018, for use in the 2018 elections and took effect with representation in 2019.[2]

Overview[edit]

Statewide[edit]

Party Candidates Votes Seats
No. % No. +/– %
Democratic 18 2,712,665 54.92% 9 Increase3 50.00%
Republican 17 2,206,260 44.67% 9 Decrease3 50.00%
Libertarian 2 10,950 0.22% 0 Steady 0.00%
Write-in 1 9,452 0.19% 0 Steady 0.00%
Total 38 4,939,327 100.0% 18 Steady 100.00%
Popular vote
Democratic
54.97%
Republican
44.81%
Libertarian
0.22%
Write-in
0.19%
House seats
Democratic
50.00%
Republican
50.00%
Libertarian
0.00%

District[edit]

Results of the 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Pennsylvania:[6]

District Democratic Republican Others Total Result
Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %
District 1 160,745 48.74% 169,053 51.26% 0 0.00% 329,798 100.0% Republican hold
District 2 159,600 79.02% 42,382 20.98% 0 0.00% 201,982 100.0% Democratic hold
District 3 287,610 93.38% 20,387 6.62% 0 0.00% 307,997 100.0% Democratic hold
District 4 211,524 63.52% 121,467 36.48% 0 0.00% 332,991 100.0% Democratic hold
District 5 198,639 65.19% 106,075 34.81% 0 0.00% 304,714 100.0% Democratic gain
District 6 177,704 58.88% 124,124 41.12% 0 0.00% 301,828 100.0% Democratic gain
District 7 140,813 53.49% 114,437 43.47% 8,011 3.04% 263,261 100.0% Democratic gain
District 8 135,603 54.64% 112,563 45.36% 0 0.00% 248,166 100.0% Democratic hold
District 9 100,204 40.25% 148,723 59.75% 0 0.00% 248,927 100.0% Republican hold
District 10 141,668 48.68% 149,365 51.32% 0 0.00% 291,033 100.0% Republican hold
District 11 113,876 41.02% 163,708 58.98% 0 0.00% 277,584 100.0% Republican hold
District 12 82,825 33.96% 161,047 66.04% 0 0.00% 243,872 100.0% Republican hold
District 13 74,733 29.51% 178,533 70.49% 0 0.00% 253,266 100.0% Republican hold
District 14 110,051 42.09% 151,386 57.91% 0 0.00% 261,437 100.0% Republican gain
District 15 78,327 32.16% 165,245 67.84% 0 0.00% 243,572 100.0% Republican hold
District 16 124,109 47.30% 135,348 51.58% 2,939 1.12% 262,396 100.0% Republican hold
District 17 183,162 56.26% 142,417 43.74% 0 0.00% 325,579 100.00% Democratic gain
District 18 231,472 96.08% 0 0.00% 9,452 3.92% 240,924 100.0% Democratic hold
Total 2,712,665 54.92%% 2,206,260 44.67% 20,402 0.41% 4,939,327 100.0%

District 1[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district election

← 2016
2020 →
 
Nominee Brian Fitzpatrick Scott Wallace
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 169,053 160,745
Percentage 51.3% 48.7%

Fitzpatrick:      50–60%      60–70%
Wallace:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      >90%
Tie:      50%

U.S. Representative before election

Brian Fitzpatrick (8th)
Republican

Elected U.S. Representative

Brian Fitzpatrick
Republican

The 1st district previously consisted of central and South Philadelphia, the City of Chester, the Philadelphia International Airport and other small sections of Delaware County.[7] Under the new congressional map that was in place in 2019 (represented per 2018's elections), the first district overlaps with much of the former 8th district, which was represented by Republican Representative Brian Fitzpatrick. Fitzpatrick took office in 2017, succeeding his brother, former Representative Mike Fitzpatrick. The new 1st district consists of Bucks County and a small portion of Montgomery County.[7]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Eliminated in primary[edit]
Withdrawn[edit]
  • Valerie Mihalek, former Yardley Borough council member and deputy district director for former U.S. Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick[9]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Fitzpatrick (incumbent) 31,374 67.0
Republican Dean Malik 15,451 33.0
Total votes 46,825 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

The old 8th district was included on the initial list of Republican held seats being targeted by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.[10]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
  • Scott Wallace, charitable foundation director and grandson of former Vice President Henry Wallace[11]
Eliminated in primary[edit]
  • Steven Bacher, environmentalist[12]
  • Rachel Reddick, former Navy prosecutor[13]
Declined[edit]
  • Diane Ellis-Marseglia, Bucks County commissioner[14]

Campaign[edit]

The race featured a number of negative ads between Reddick and Wallace. With Reddick's campaign releasing an ad calling Wallace a “Maryland multi-millionaire” and stating that he had case an absentee ballot cast from his second home in a South African “gated luxury estate”. The Wallace campaign responded with an ad higlishting Reddick flubbing a question about the so-called “global gag rule” during a campaign stop in Ottsville,[15] and for her having been registered as a Republican for most of her adult life.[16]

Many DC Democrats expressed excitement about Wallace's potential to spend big to defeat Fitzpatrick, especially in the expensive Philadelphia market. He loaned his campaign $2.5 million while Reddick only raised $363,000 and was shunned by most party strategists.[17]

Endorsements[edit]

Scott Wallace
Organizations
Local officials
  • Diane Ellis-Marseglia, Bucks County commissioner

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Scott Wallace 27,652 56.5
Democratic Rachel Reddick 17,288 35.3
Democratic Steven Bacher 4,006 8.2
Total votes 48,946 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Steve Scheetz (L)
Organizations
  • Firearm Owners Against Crime[43]

Debate[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district debate
No. Date Host Moderator Link Republican Democratic
Key:
 P  Participant   A  Absent   N  Not invited   I  Invited  W  Withdrawn
Brian Fitzpatrick Scott Wallace
1 October 19, 2018 Bucks County Chamber of Commerce
Pennsylvania Cable Network
League of Women Voters of Bucks County
Carlo Borgia C-SPAN P P

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Brian
Fitzpatrick (R)
Scott
Wallace (D)
Other Undecided
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 26–29, 2018 502 ± 4.7% 47% 46% 7%
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 11–14, 2018 570 ± 4.6% 43% 50% 8%
Public Opinion Strategies (R-Fitzpatrick) October 2–4, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 50% 42%
Monmouth University September 27 – October 1, 2018 353 ± 5.2% 50% 46% 1% 3%
Monmouth University May 31 – June 3, 2018 254 LV ± 6.5% 48% 47% 0% 5%
451 RV ± 4.6% 49% 42% 1% 8%
DCCC (D) May 12–14, 2018 540 ± 4.2% 48% 46% 6%

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[44] Tossup November 5, 2018
Inside Elections[45] Tossup November 5, 2018
Sabato's Crystal Ball[46] Lean R November 5, 2018
RCP[47] Tossup November 5, 2018
Daily Kos[48] Tossup November 5, 2018
538[49] Tossup November 7, 2018
CNN[50] Tossup October 31, 2018
Politico[51] Tossup November 4, 2018

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district, 2018[52]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Fitzpatrick (incumbent) 169,053 51.3
Democratic Scott Wallace 160,745 48.7
Total votes 329,798 100.0
Republican hold

Analysis[edit]

Fitzpatrick held out to win re-election, despite many similar suburban districts held by Republicans falling to Democrats in the 2018 cycle. Fitzpatrick did this by establishing a reputation for himself as an independent centrist who attained endorsements from several usually-left-leaning and nonpartisan groups without enraging the more fervently pro-Trump wing of the Republican party. Analysts considered the Democratic nominee Scott Wallace an unusually weak candidate: he was a wealthy heir who moved to the district, opening up accusations of carpetbagging, and made several gaffes and missteps. Editor Dave Wasserman of the Cook Political Report wrote that Wallace was perhaps the weakest candidate of the 2018 cycle.[53]

District 2[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 2nd congressional district election

← 2016
2020 →
 
Nominee Brendan Boyle Dave Torres
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 159,600 42,382
Percentage 79.0% 21.0%

Boyle:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%
Torres:      50–60%

U.S. Representative before election

Bob Brady (1st)
Democratic

Elected U.S. Representative

Brendan Boyle
Democratic

The 2nd district consists of the northern half of Philadelphia. It mostly overlaps with the old 1st District. That district's incumbent, Democrat Bob Brady, had served since 1998, but did not run for reelection. The incumbent of the old 2nd district is Dwight Evans, but Evans opted to follow most of his constituents into the 3rd District.[7]

The new map drew the home of fellow Democrat Brendan Boyle, who had represented the neighboring 13th District since 2015, into the 2nd, leading to speculation that he would run for reelection there. Soon after the new map was released, Boyle confirmed that he would indeed run in the 2nd.[54]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Eliminated in primary[edit]
Declined[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brendan Boyle (incumbent) 23,261 64.5
Democratic Michele Lawrence 12,814 35.5
Total votes 36,075 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
  • David Torres, community activist

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Torres 7,443 100.0
Total votes 7,443 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 2nd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brendan Boyle (incumbent) 159,600 79.0
Republican David Torres 42,382 21.0
Total votes 201,982 100.0
Democratic hold

District 3[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 3rd congressional district election

← 2016
2020 →
 
Nominee Dwight Evans Bryan E. Leib
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 287,610 20,387
Percentage 93.4% 6.6%

Evans:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%

U.S. Representative before election

Dwight Evans (2nd)
Democratic

Elected U.S. Representative

Dwight Evans
Democratic

The 3rd district was previously located in Northwestern Pennsylvania, but now covers downtown and northern Philadelphia, and overlaps with much of the previous 2nd district.[7] The incumbent from the 2nd district is Democrat Dwight Evans, who had held office since 2016. Evans defeated incumbent Democratic Representative Chaka Fattah in the 2016 Democratic primary, and then went on to be elected with 90% in both the general election and a simultaneous special election for the remainder of the term after Fattah resigned.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Eliminated in primary[edit]
  • Kevin Johnson

Endorsements[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dwight Evans (incumbent) 72,106 80.8
Democratic Kevin Johnson 17,153 19.2
Total votes 89,259 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
  • Bryan Leib

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bryan E. Leib 3,331 100.0
Total votes 3,331 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 3rd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dwight Evans (incumbent) 287,610 93.4
Republican Bryan E. Leib 20,387 6.6
Total votes 307,997 100.0
Democratic hold

District 4[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 4th congressional district election

← 2016
2020 →
 
Nominee Madeleine Dean Dan David
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 211,524 121,467
Percentage 63.5% 36.5%

Dean:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%
David:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%

U.S. Representative before election

Brendan Boyle (13th)
Democratic

Elected U.S. Representative

Madeleine Dean
Democratic

The old 4th district was in South Central Pennsylvania, but the new 4th district is centered in Montgomery County. The district overlaps with the former 13th district. The incumbent from this district, Democrat Brendan Boyle, could have sought re-election in either this district or the new 2nd district, which absorbed his home and most of old 13th's share of Philadelphia.[7] Boyle opted to run in the 2nd, making the 4th an open seat.

Democratic primary[edit]

State Senator Daylin Leach had announced that he would run for Congress in the old 7th District, but was expected to switch races after his home was drawn into the new 4th. However, on February 24, 2018, Leach succumbed to pressures from fellow Democrats, including Governor Tom Wolf, to abandon his congressional campaign in the face of accusations of sexual harassment. However, he remained in his Pennsylvania Senate seat.[58]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Eliminated in primary[edit]
  • Shira Goodman, public policy advocate[59]
  • Joe Hoeffel, former U.S. Representative, nominee for Senate in 2004 and candidate for governor in 2010[60]
Withdrawn[edit]
Declined[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Madeleine Dean
State legislators
Labor unions

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Madeleine Dean 42,625 72.6
Democratic Shira Goodman 9,645 16.4
Democratic Joe Hoeffel 6,431 11.0
Total votes 58,701 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
  • Dan David, investor

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan David 28,889 100.0
Total votes 28,889 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 4th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Madeleine Dean 211,524 63.5
Republican Dan David 121,467 36.5
Total votes 332,991 100.0
Democratic hold

District 5[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 5th congressional district election

 
Nominee Mary Gay Scanlon Pearl Kim
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 198,639 106,075
Percentage 65.2% 34.8%

Scanlon:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%
Kim:      50–60%      60–70%
Tie:      50%
     No votes

U.S. Representative before election

Mary Gay Scanlon (7th)
Democratic

Elected U.S. Representative

Mary Gay Scanlon
Democratic

The old 5th district was in North Central Pennsylvania, but the new 5th district consists of Delaware County, portions of southern Philadelphia, and a sliver of Montgomery County. The district overlaps with much of the old 7th district, whose incumbent Republican Representative Pat Meehan chose not to seek re-election, due to allegations regarding a sexual harassment complaint that was settled with the use of taxpayer funds,[7][67] and subsequently resigned from office in April.

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Disqualified[edit]
Declined[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pearl Kim 33,685 100.0
Total votes 33,685 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Eliminated in primary[edit]
Withdrawn[edit]
  • George Badey III, attorney and nominee for this seat in 2012[69]
  • Shelly Chauncey, attorney and former CIA agent[70] (endorsed Lunkenheimer)[69]
  • Dan Muroff, attorney[68]
  • David Wertime, journalist[71]

Endorsements[edit]

Richard Lazer
Dan Muroff
Labor unions
Mary Gay Scanlon
Governors

Polling[edit]

Poll
source
Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Margo
Davidson
Thaddeus
Kirkland
Rich
Lazer
Lindy
Li
Ashley
Lunkenheimer
Mary Gay
Scanlon
Molly
Sheehan
Greg
Vitali
Theresa
Wright
Other Undecided
Chism Strategies Advocacy & Elections May 2018 638 ±3.8 7% 11% 22% 17% 57%
Independence Communications and Consulting April 2018 858 ±3.3 7% 12% 10% 17% 7% 13% 7% 27%
Public Policy Polling (D-Vitali) April 23–24, 2018 562 5% 4% 5% 6% 18% 6% 17% 8% 5% 25%

Forum[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 5th congressional district democratic primary candidate forum
No. Date Host Moderator Link Democratic Democratic Democratic Democratic Democratic Democratic Democratic Democratic Democratic Democratic Democratic Democratic Democratic Democratic
Key:
 P  Participant   A  Absent   N  Not invited   I  Invited  W  Withdrawn
Larry Arata George Badey III Shelly Chauncey Margo L. Davidson Thaddeus Kirkland Richard Lazer Lindy Li Ashley Lunkenheimer Dan Muroff Mary Gay Scanlon Molly Sheehan Greg Vitali David Wertime Theresa Wright
1[72] April 5, 2018 P P P P P P P P P P P P P A
2[74] May 1, 2018 League of Women Voters
of Central Delaware County
Jennifer Levy-Tatum YouTube P W W P A A P P W P P P W P

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mary Gay Scanlon 16,804 28.4
Democratic Ashley Lunkenheimer 9,044 15.3
Democratic Richard Lazer 8,892 15.0
Democratic Molly Sheehan 6,099 10.3
Democratic Greg Vitali 5,558 9.4
Democratic Lindy Li 4,126 7.0
Democratic Theresa Wright 3,046 5.2
Democratic Thaddeus Kirkland 2,327 3.9
Democratic Margo L. Davidson 2,275 3.9
Democratic Larry Arata 913 1.5
Total votes 59,084 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[44] Likely D (flip) November 5, 2018
Inside Elections[45] Likely D (flip) November 5, 2018
Sabato's Crystal Ball[46] Safe D (flip) November 5, 2018
RCP[47] Likely D (flip) November 5, 2018
Daily Kos[48] Safe D (flip) November 5, 2018
538[49] Safe D (flip) November 7, 2018
CNN[50] Likely D (flip) October 31, 2018
Politico[51] Safe D (flip) November 4, 2018

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 5th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mary Gay Scanlon 198,639 65.2
Republican Pearl Kim 106,075 34.8
Total votes 304,714 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 6[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 6th congressional district election

← 2016
2020 →
 
Nominee Chrissy Houlahan Greg McCauley
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 177,704 124,124
Percentage 58.9% 41.1%

Houlahan:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%
McCauley:      50–60%      60–70%      >90%

U.S. Representative before election

Ryan Costello
Republican

Elected U.S. Representative

Chrissy Houlahan
Democratic

The 6th district consists of Chester County and Reading.[7] The incumbent is Republican Ryan Costello, who had represented the district since 2015. He was re-elected to a second term with 57% of the vote in 2016. On March 24, 2018, Costello announced that he would no longer seek re-election due to the growing Democratic voter demographic in the 6th district.[75] Costello formally withdrew his name on March 27.

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
  • Greg McCauley
Withdrawn[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Greg McCauley 31,611 100.0
Total votes 31,611 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Chrissy Houlahan 34,947 100.0
Total votes 34,947 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Chrissy Houlahan (D)
Executive branch officials
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
State officials
Labor unions
Organizations
Local officials

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[44] Likely D (flip) November 5, 2018
Inside Elections[45] Likely D (flip) November 5, 2018
Sabato's Crystal Ball[46] Safe D (flip) November 5, 2018
RCP[47] Likely D (flip) November 5, 2018
Daily Kos[48] Safe D (flip) November 5, 2018
538[49] Safe D (flip) November 7, 2018
CNN[50] Likely D (flip) October 31, 2018
Politico[51] Likely D (flip) November 4, 2018

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 6th congressional district, 2018[87]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Chrissy Houlahan 177,704 58.9
Republican Greg McCauley 124,124 41.1
Total votes 301,828 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 7[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 7th congressional district election

 
Nominee Susan Wild Marty Nothstein
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 140,813 114,437
Percentage 53.5% 43.5%

Wild:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
Nothstein:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%
Tie:      40–50%

U.S. Representative before election

Susan Wild (15th)
Democratic

Elected U.S. Representative

Susan Wild
Democratic

The 7th district was formerly centered on Delaware County, but the new district consisted of much of the Lehigh Valley. The new 7th district overlapped with much of the former 15th district, which was represented by retired Republican Representative Charlie Dent, who resigned early.[7]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Eliminated in primary[edit]
Withdrawn[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Marty Nothstein 16,004 50.5
Republican Dean Browning 15,696 49.5
Total votes 31,700 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Eliminated in primary[edit]

Withdrawn[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

John Morganelli
State legislators

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Susan Wild 15,001 33.3
Democratic John Morganelli 13,565 30.1
Democratic Greg Edwards 11,510 25.6
Democratic Roger Ruggles 2,443 5.4
Democratic Rick Daugherty 1,718 3.8
Democratic David Clark 766 1.7
Total votes 45,003 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Marty Nothstein (R)
Organizations
Local officials

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Marty
Nothstein (R)
Susan
Wild (D)
Tim
Silfies (L)
Undecided
Muhlenberg College Archived October 19, 2018, at the Wayback Machine October 14–18, 2018 411 ± 5.5% 41% 48% 5%
DeSales University Archived October 10, 2018, at the Wayback Machine September 28 – October 7, 2018 405 ± 4.5% 31% 50% 8% 11%
NYT Upshot/Siena College September 21–25, 2018 539 ± 4.7% 42% 50% 8%
Monmouth University September 5–9, 2018 299 LV ± 5.7% 45% 47% 2% 7%
401 RV ± 4.9% 40% 46% 3% 11%
Muhlenberg College Archived June 15, 2018, at the Wayback Machine April 24 – May 3, 2018 408 ± 5.5% 31% 42% 5% 21%

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[44] Lean D (flip) November 5, 2018
Inside Elections[45] Lean D (flip) November 5, 2018
Sabato's Crystal Ball[46] Lean D (flip) November 5, 2018
RCP[47] Lean D (flip) November 5, 2018
Daily Kos[48] Lean D (flip) November 5, 2018
538[49] Safe D (flip) November 7, 2018
CNN[50] Lean D (flip) October 31, 2018
Politico[51] Lean D (flip) November 4, 2018

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 7th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Susan Wild 140,813 53.5
Republican Marty Nothstein 114,437 43.5
Libertarian Tim Silfies 8,011 3.0
Total votes 263,261 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 8[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 8th congressional district election

← 2016
2020 →
 
Nominee Matt Cartwright John Chrin
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 135,603 112,563
Percentage 54.6% 45.4%

Cartwright:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
Chrin:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%

U.S. Representative before election

Matt Cartwright (17th)
Democratic

Elected U.S. Representative

Matt Cartwright
Democratic

The 8th district was previously centered on Bucks County, but now consists of portions of Northeastern Pennsylvania, including the city of Scranton. The new district overlaps with much of the former 17th district, which was represented by Democratic Representative Matt Cartwright.[7] Cartwright had held office since 2013.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Matt Cartwright (incumbent) 36,040 100.0
Total votes 36,040 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
  • John Chrin, businessman[106]
Eliminated in primary[edit]
  • Robert Kuniegel
  • Joe Peters, former federal prosecutor[107]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Chrin 15,136 48.4
Republican Joe Peters 10,927 34.9
Republican Robert Kuniegel 5,218 16.7
Total votes 31,281 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

John Chrin (R)

Executive branch officials

Organizations
State representatives

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Matt
Cartwright (D)
John
Chrin (R)
Other Undecided
Susquehanna Polling & Research October 28–29, 2018 446 ± 4.6% 57% 40% 1%[111] 2%
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 16–19, 2018 506 ± 4.7% 52% 40% 8%

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[44] Likely D November 5, 2018
Inside Elections[45] Lean D November 5, 2018
Sabato's Crystal Ball[46] Likely D November 5, 2018
RCP[47] Likely D November 5, 2018
Daily Kos[48] Likely D November 5, 2018
538[49] Safe D November 7, 2018
CNN[50] Likely D October 31, 2018
Politico[51] Likely D November 4, 2018

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 8th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Matt Cartwright (incumbent) 135,603 54.6
Republican John Chrin 112,563 45.4
Total votes 248,166 100.0
Democratic hold

District 9[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 9th congressional district election

← 2016
2020 →
 
Nominee Dan Meuser Denny Wolff
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 148,723 100,204
Percentage 59.7% 40.3%

Meuser:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%
Wolff:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%

U.S. Representative before election

Lou Barletta (11th)
Republican

Elected U.S. Representative

Dan Meuser
Republican

The old 9th district was in South Central Pennsylvania, but the new 9th district is in east central Pennsylvania. The new district overlaps with the old 11th district, which was represented by retiring Republican Representative Lou Barletta.[7]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Eliminated in primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Meuser 26,568 53.0
Republican George Halcovage Jr. 12,032 24.0
Republican Scott Uehlinger 11,541 23.0
Total votes 50,141 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Eliminated in primary[edit]
  • Laura Quick, delivery driver
  • Gary Wegman, dentist

Endorsements[edit]

Laura Quick
Labor unions

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Denny Wolff 11,020 40.7
Democratic Gary Wegman 8,450 31.2
Democratic Laura Quick 7,616 28.1
Total votes 27,086 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Dan
Meuser (R)
Denny
Wolff (D)
Other Undecided
Susquehanna Polling and Research October 23–25, 2018 271 ± 5.9% 57% 36% 1%[112] 6%

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 9th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Meuser 148,723 59.7
Democratic Denny Wolff 100,204 40.3
Total votes 248,927 100.0
Republican hold

District 10[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district election

← 2016
2020 →
 
Nominee Scott Perry George Scott
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 149,365 141,668
Percentage 51.3% 48.7%

Perry:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%
Scott:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%

U.S. Representative before election

Scott Perry (4th)
Republican

Elected U.S. Representative

Scott Perry
Republican

The 10th district was previously in Northeastern Pennsylvania, but it now overlaps with much of the former 4th district in South Central Pennsylvania. Under the map released in 2018, the 10th district includes Harrisburg and a portion of York County.[7] The incumbent from the 4th district is Republican Scott Perry, who had represented his district since 2013. He was re-elected to a third term with 66% of the vote in 2016. Several Democrats sought to challenge Perry in 2018, with George Scott, a 20-year Army veteran and Lutheran pastor, receiving the party's nomination.[113][114][115]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott Perry (incumbent) 57,407 100.0
Total votes 57,407 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
  • George Scott, Lutheran pastor and former Army Lt. Colonel
Eliminated in primary[edit]
Withdrawn[edit]
  • Christina Hartman, former nonprofit executive and nominee for Pennsylvania's 16th congressional district in 2016[118]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic George Scott 13,924 36.3
Democratic Shavonnia Corbin-Johnson 13,376 34.9
Democratic Eric Ding 6,912 18.0
Democratic Alan Howe 4,157 10.8
Total votes 38,369 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Scott Perry (R)
Executive branch officials
Organizations

Debates[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district debates
No. Date Host Moderator Link Republican Democratic
Key:
 P  Participant   A  Absent   N  Not invited   I  Invited  W  Withdrawn
Scott Perry George Scott
1 September 17, 2018 Rotary Club of York YouTube P P
2 October 18, 2018 American Association of University Women
WGAL-TV
Janelle Stelson
Mike Straub
C-SPAN P P

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Scott
Perry (R)
George
Scott (D)
Other Undecided
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 23–26, 2018 498 ± 4.7% 45% 43% 12%
Susquehanna Polling and Research October 19–21, 2018 366 ± 5.2% 49% 46% 1%[112] 4%
Public Policy Polling (D) September 24–25, 2018 650 44% 43% 12%
Public Policy Polling (D-Scott) June 8–10, 2018 654 ± 4.1% 45% 41% 14%

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[44] Tossup November 5, 2018
Inside Elections[45] Lean R November 5, 2018
Sabato's Crystal Ball[46] Lean R November 5, 2018
RCP[47] Tossup November 5, 2018
Daily Kos[48] Lean R November 5, 2018
538[49] Lean R November 7, 2018
CNN[50] Lean R October 31, 2018
Politico[51] Lean R November 4, 2018

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 10th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott Perry (incumbent) 149,365 51.3
Democratic George Scott 141,668 48.7
Total votes 291,033 100.0
Republican hold

District 11[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district election

← 2016 November 6, 2018 2020 →
 
Nominee Lloyd Smucker Jess King
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 162,835 114,831
Percentage 58.6% 41.4%

Smucker:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
King:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%
Tie:      50%

U.S. Representative before election

Lloyd Smucker (16th)
Republican

Elected U.S. Representative

Lloyd Smucker
Republican

The old 11th district was in Northeastern Pennsylvania, but the district now overlaps with much of the former 16th district in South Central Pennsylvania. The new district consists of Lancaster County and portions of York County. The incumbent from the former 16th district is Republican Lloyd Smucker, who had held office since 2017.[7]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lloyd Smucker (incumbent) 34,002 58.6
Republican Chet Beiler 24,063 41.4
Total votes 58,065 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

Christina Hartman, a former nonprofit executive who lost against Smucker in 16th had filed for a rematch;[121] however, following the court-ordered redrawing, she considered switching to run in the more competitive 10th before withdrawing from the race altogether.[118]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
  • Jess King, nonprofit director
Withdrawn[edit]
  • John George, former Warwick superintendent[122][123]
  • Christina Hartman, former nonprofit executive and nominee for this seat in 2016
  • Charles Klein, pharmacist and candidate for state representative in 2016[124]

Endorsements[edit]

Christina Hartman (withdrawn)
State legislators
Statewide officials
Organizations
Jess King
State legislators
Labor unions
Organizations
Local officials

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jess King 22,794 100.0
Total votes 22,794 100.0

General election[edit]

Meteorologist Drew Anderson planned to run without party affiliation and expected to be listed that way on the November ballot.[128] However, he failed to file papers in time, and was not in the race.[129]

Debate[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district debate
No. Date Host Moderator Link Republican Democratic
Key:
 P  Participant   A  Absent   N  Not invited   I  Invited  W  Withdrawn
Lloyd Smucker Jess King
1 Oct. 30, 2018 Eastern York School District
WGAL
York County Economic Alliance
Janelle Stelson
Mike Straub
YouTube (Part 1)
YouTube (Part 2)
YouTube (Part 3)
YouTube (Part 4)
P P

Endorsements[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Lloyd
Smucker (R)
Jess
King (D)
Other Undecided
Susquehanna Polling and Research October 21–22, 2018 311 ± 5.6% 50% 46% 1%[112] 3%
Public Policy Polling (D-King) Archived September 25, 2018, at the Wayback Machine September 12–13, 2018 552 ± 4.2% 44% 35% 21%

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[44] Safe R November 5, 2018
Inside Elections[45] Safe R November 5, 2018
Sabato's Crystal Ball[46] Safe R November 5, 2018
RCP[47] Safe R November 5, 2018
Daily Kos[48] Safe R November 5, 2018
538[49] Likely R November 7, 2018
CNN[50] Safe R October 31, 2018
Politico[51] Safe R November 4, 2018

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 11th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lloyd Smucker (incumbent) 163,708 59.0
Democratic Jess King 113,876 41.0
Total votes 277,584 100.0
Republican hold

District 12[edit]

Pennsylvania's 12th congressional district, 2018

← 2016 November 6, 2018 2019 (special) →
 
Nominee Tom Marino Marc Friedenburg
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 160,193 82,122
Percentage 66.1% 33.9%

Marino:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%
Friedenburg:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%

U.S. Representative before election

Tom Marino (10th)
Republican

Elected U.S. Representative

Tom Marino
Republican

The old 12th district was in Southwestern Pennsylvania, but the new district is in North Central Pennsylvania. It overlaps with the former 10th district, which was represented by Republican Tom Marino.[7] Marino had held office since 2011.

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Eliminated in primary[edit]
  • Douglas McLinko

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tom Marino (incumbent) 39,537 67.0
Republican Douglas McLinko 19,435 33.0
Total votes 58,972 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
  • Marc Friedenburg, teacher
Eliminated in primary[edit]
  • Judith Herschel, certified drug and alcohol counselor

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marc Friedenburg 12,713 50.6
Democratic Judith Herschel 12,407 49.4
Total votes 25,120 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 12th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tom Marino (incumbent) 161,047 66.0
Democratic Marc Friedenburg 82,825 34.0
Total votes 243,872 100.0
Republican hold

District 13[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 13th congressional district election

← 2016
2020 →
 
Nominee John Joyce Brent Ottaway
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 178,533 74,733
Percentage 70.5% 29.5%

Joyce:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%
Ottaway:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
Tie:      40–50%
     No votes

U.S. representative before election

Bill Shuster (9th)
Republican

Elected U.S. representative

John Joyce
Republican

The old 13th district was in Southeastern Pennsylvania, but the new district is in Western Pennsylvania. The new district overlaps with much of the old 9th district, which was represented by retiring Republican Representative Bill Shuster.[7]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Eliminated in primary[edit]
Declined[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Results by county:
  Joyce
  •   20–30%
  •   30–40%
  Eichelberger
  •   20–30%
  •   40–50%
  Bloom
  •   40–50%
  •   70–80%
  Mastriano
  •   30–40%
  Halvorson
  •   30–40%
Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Joyce 14,615 21.9
Republican John Eichelberger 13,101 19.6
Republican Stephen Bloom 12,195 18.3
Republican Doug Mastriano 10,485 15.7
Republican Art Halvorson 10,161 15.2
Republican Travis Schooley 3,030 4.5
Republican Bernie Washabaugh 1,908 2.9
Republican Ben Hornberger 1,182 1.8
Total votes 66,677 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
  • Brent Ottaway

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Brent Ottaway 21,096 100.0
Total votes 1,096 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
John
Joyce (R)
Brent
Ottaway (D)
Other Undecided
Susquehanna Polling and Research October 25–26, 2018 303 ± 5.6% 57% 36% 2%[136] 5%

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 13th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Joyce 178,533 70.5
Democratic Brent Ottaway 74,733 29.5
Total votes 253,266 100.0
Republican hold

District 14[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 14th congressional district election

← 2018 (Special) November 6, 2018 2020 →
 
Nominee Guy Reschenthaler Bibiana Boerio
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 149,147 108,179
Percentage 58.0% 42.0%

Reschenthaler:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
Boerio:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
Tie:      40–50%      50%
     No votes

U.S. Representative before election

Conor Lamb (18th)
Democratic

Elected U.S. Representative

Guy Reschenthaler
Republican

The old 14th district consisted of the city of Pittsburgh and parts of surrounding suburbs, but the new district consists of suburbs to the south and west of Pittsburgh. The district overlaps with much of the former 18th district.[7] The winner of the 2018 special election, Democrat Conor Lamb, ran in the more competitive 17th district.[137]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Eliminated in primary[edit]
  • Tom Prigg
  • Adam Sedlock, psychologist
  • Bob Solomon, physician and candidate for this seat in 2018
Declined[edit]
  • Conor Lamb, incumbent U.S. Representative (running in the 17th)

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bibiana Boerio 17,755 43.0
Democratic Adam Sedlock 9,944 24.1
Democratic Bob Solomon 7,831 19.0
Democratic Tom Prigg 5,724 13.9
Total votes 41,254 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Eliminated in primary[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Guy Reschenthaler 23,245 55.4
Republican Rick Saccone 18,734 44.6
Total votes 41,979 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Bibiana Boerio (D)
Guy Reschenthaler (R)

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[44] Likely R (flip) November 5, 2018
Inside Elections[45] Likely R (flip) November 5, 2018
Sabato's Crystal Ball[46] Safe R (flip) November 5, 2018
RCP[47] Likely R (flip) November 5, 2018
Daily Kos[48] Safe R (flip) November 5, 2018
538[49] Safe R (flip) November 7, 2018
CNN[50] Safe R (flip) October 31, 2018
Politico[51] Safe R (flip) November 4, 2018

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 14th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Guy Reschenthaler 151,386 57.9
Democratic Bibiana Boerio 110,051 42.1
Total votes 261,437 100.0
Republican gain from Democratic

District 15[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 15th congressional district election

← 2016
2020 →
 
Nominee Glenn Thompson Susan Boser
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 165,245 78,327
Percentage 67.8% 32.2%

Thompson:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%
Boser:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%
Tie:      50%

U.S. representative before election

Glenn Thompson (5th)
Republican

Elected U.S. representative

Glenn Thompson
Republican

The old 15th district was in Eastern Pennsylvania, but the new district is in Western Pennsylvania. The new district overlaps with much of the former 5th district, which was represented by Republican G.T. Thompson.[7] Thompson had held office since 2009.

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Declined[edit]
Withdrew[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican G.T. Thompson (incumbent) 44,893 100.0
Total votes 44,893 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
  • Susan Boser, teacher
Eliminated in primary[edit]
  • Wade Jodun

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Susan Boser 20,135 74.5
Democratic Wade Jodun 6,902 25.5
Total votes 27,037 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 15th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican G.T. Thompson (incumbent) 165,245 67.8
Democratic Susan Boser 78,327 32.2
Total votes 243,572 100.0
Republican hold

District 16[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 16th congressional district election

← 2016
2020 →
 
Nominee Mike Kelly Ronald DiNicola
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 135,348 124,109
Percentage 51.6% 47.3%

Kelly:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%
DiNicola:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%
Tie:      40–50%

U.S. representative before election

Mike Kelly (3rd)
Republican

Elected U.S. representative

Mike Kelly
Republican

The former 16th district was in Southeastern Pennsylvania, but the redrawn 16th district is in Northwestern Pennsylvania, overlapping with the former 3rd district.[7] The incumbent from the 3rd district was Republican Mike Kelly, who had represented the district since 2011. He was re-elected to a fourth term unopposed in 2016. Kelly had considered running for the U.S. Senate, but announced he would run for re-election instead.[140]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Kelly (incumbent) 39,146 100.0
Total votes 39,146 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Eliminated in primary[edit]
  • Robert Multari, physician[141]
  • Chris Rieger, attorney[141]

Endorsements[edit]

Debate[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 16th congressional district democratic primary debate
No. Date Host Moderator Link Democratic Democratic Democratic
Key:
 P  Participant   A  Absent   N  Not invited   I  Invited  W  Withdrawn
Ron DiNicola Robert Multari Chris Rieger
1[142] April 16, 2018 Allegheny College Center for Political Participation
The Meadville Tribune
Rick Green
Keith Gushard
Marley Parish
YouTube P P P

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ron DiNicola 23,362 60.2
Democratic Chris Rieger 9,681 24.9
Democratic Robert Multari 5,764 14.9
Total votes 38,807 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Debate[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 16th congressional district debate
No. Date Host Moderator Link Republican Democratic
Key:
 P  Participant   A  Absent   N  Not invited   I  Invited  W  Withdrawn
Mike Kelly Ron DiNicola
1 October 8, 2018 Mercyhurst University
WKBN-TV
Sean Lafferty C-SPAN P P

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Mike
Kelly (R)
Ron
DiNicola (D)
Other Undecided
Susquehanna Polling & Research October 29–30, 2018 405 ± 4.9% 47% 51% 1%[111] 1%
DCCC (D) October 9–10, 2018 548 ± 4.2% 49% 46% 5%
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 5–8, 2018 532 ± 4.8% 50% 42% 8%
Normington, Petts & Associates (D-DiNicola) June 5–7, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 50% 44% 6%
Public Policy Polling (D-DiNicola) May 21–22, 2018 623 ± 3.9% 48% 43% 10%

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[44] Lean R November 5, 2018
Inside Elections[45] Likely R November 5, 2018
Sabato's Crystal Ball[46] Lean R November 5, 2018
RCP[47] Tossup November 5, 2018
Daily Kos[48] Lean R November 5, 2018
538[49] Likely R November 7, 2018
CNN[50] Lean R October 31, 2018
Politico[51] Lean R November 4, 2018

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 16th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Kelly (incumbent) 135,348 51.6
Democratic Ronald DiNicola 124,109 47.3
Libertarian Ebert "Bill" Beeman 2,939 1.1
Total votes 262,396 100.0
Republican hold

District 17[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 17th congressional district election

← 2016
2020 →
 
Nominee Conor Lamb Keith Rothfus
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 183,162 142,417
Percentage 56.3% 43.7%

Lamb:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%
Rothfus:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%
Tie:      50%

U.S. Representative before election

Keith Rothfus (12th)
Republican

Elected U.S. Representative

Conor Lamb
Democratic

The former 17th district was in Northeastern Pennsylvania, but the new 17th district consists of suburbs west of Pittsburgh. The district overlaps with parts of the former 12th district, which was represented by Republican Keith Rothfus.[7] Rothfus had held office since 2013, and ran for reelection in the new 17th.[146]

The new map drew the home of Democrat Conor Lamb, who won a special election for the old 18th District, into the new 17th. The 17th is far less Republican than its predecessor, and voted for Democrats downballot, leading to speculation that Lamb would run for a full term in the 17th regardless of the special election result.[7] On March 14, Democratic officials in Beaver County, which is entirely within the 17th, received a written request from Lamb for their endorsement in the 2018 general election.[147] On March 20, Lamb formally filed to run for a full term in the 17th.[148]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Keith Rothfus (incumbent) 38,466 100.0
Total votes 38,466 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Conor Lamb (incumbent) 52,508 100.0
Total votes 52,508 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Keith Rothfus (R)
Executive branch officials
Organizations

Debate[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 17th congressional district debate
No. Date Host Moderator Link Democratic Republican
Key:
 P  Participant   A  Absent   N  Not invited   I  Invited  W  Withdrawn
Conor Lamb Keith Rothfus
1 October 16, 2018 WTAE-TV Mike Clark C-SPAN P P

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Keith
Rothfus (R)
Conor
Lamb (D)
Other Undecided
Monmouth University October 5–8, 2018 354 ± 5.2% 42% 54% 0% 4%
Monmouth University July 19–22, 2018 355 LV ± 5.2% 40% 53% 2% 5%
401 RV ± 4.9% 39% 51% 2% 9%

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[44] Likely D (flip) November 5, 2018
Inside Elections[45] Lean D (flip) November 5, 2018
Sabato's Crystal Ball[46] Likely D (flip) November 5, 2018
RCP[47] Likely D (flip) November 5, 2018
Daily Kos[48] Likely D (flip) November 5, 2018
538[49] Safe D (flip) November 7, 2018
CNN[50] Lean D (flip) October 31, 2018
Politico[51] Likely D (flip) November 4, 2018

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 17th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Conor Lamb (incumbent) 183,162 56.3
Republican Keith Rothfus (incumbent) 142,417 43.7
Total votes 325,579 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 18[edit]

2018 Pennsylvania's 18th congressional district election

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2020 →
 
Nominee Mike Doyle
Party Democratic
Popular vote 231,472
Percentage 96.1%

Doyle:      70–80%      80–90%      >90%
     No votes

U.S. Representative before election

Mike Doyle (14th)
Democratic

Elected U.S. Representative

Mike Doyle
Democratic

The 18th district formerly consisted of the southern suburbs of Pittsburgh, but the new district is now centered on Pittsburgh itself. The district overlaps with the former 14th district, which was represented by Democrat Michael F. Doyle.[7] Doyle had held office since 1995. He ran unopposed in the general election.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominee[edit]
Eliminated in primary[edit]
  • Janis C. Brooks, pastor, CEO/founder of Citizens to Abolish Domestic Apartheid and candidate for this seat in 2012, 2014 & 2016

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Doyle (incumbent) 51,879 75.9
Democratic Janis Brooks 16,488 24.1
Total votes 68,367 100.0

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Results[edit]

Pennsylvania's 18th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Doyle (incumbent) 231,472 96.1
Write-in 9,452 3.9
Total votes 231,472 100.0
Democratic hold

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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