2018 in spaceflight

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2018 in spaceflight
Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft docking to the ISS.jpg
An artist's rendition shows the CST-100 Starliner capsule undocking from the International Space Station (ISS). Both the Boeing Starliner and the SpaceX Dragon 2 spacecraft are scheduled to carry their first astronauts to the ISS in late 2018.
Orbital launches
First 8 January
Last 22 February
Total 20
Successes 19
Failures 0
Partial failures 1
Catalogued 20
National firsts
Satellite
Orbital launch
Rockets
Maiden flights
Retirements
Crewed flights
EVAs 3

This article lists achieved and expected spaceflight events in 2018.

In planetary exploration, the NASA InSight seismology probe is expected to launch and land on Mars within 2018. ESA and JAXA will launch BepiColombo to Mercury, on a 10-year mission featuring several flybys and eventually deploying two orbiters in 2025 for local study. Two asteroid sampling missions Hayabusa 2 and OSIRIS-REx will reach their respective targets, Ryugu and Bennu, in the latter half of the year.[1][2]

China will launch its Chang'e 4 lander/rover in the latter part of the year. The mission was originally designated as a backup of its Chang'e 3 mission but later re-purposed to attempt the first ever soft landing on the far side of the Moon. In 2018 or early 2019 China will also launch the core module Tianhe-1, which is the first of three large modules that will make up the completed Chinese Space Station (CSS).[3] India plans to launch its Chandrayaan-2 lunar orbiter/lander/rover in the first quarter of 2018.[4] The Google Lunar X Prize will expire on 31 March 2018 without a winner for its $20 million grand prize, because none of its five finalist teams would be able to launch a commercial lunar lander mission before the deadline.[5]

After a failed launch in 2017, the Electron rocket reached orbit with its second flight in January; it is the first orbital rocket equipped with electric pump-fed engines.[6] On February 3, the Japanese SS-520-5 rocket (a modified sounding rocket) successfully delivered a 3U CubeSat to orbit. It became the lightest and smallest orbital launch vehicle.[7] On February 6, SpaceX performed the much-delayed test flight of Falcon Heavy,[8] carrying a car and a mannequin to an heliocentric orbit beyond Mars.[9] Falcon Heavy is the most powerful rocket currently operational.[10]

Towards the end of the year, the first crewed missions of both CST-100 Starliner and Dragon 2 capsules to the ISS are scheduled to restore American manned spaceflight capabilities,[11] which stopped with the last Space Shuttle flight in 2011.[12]

As of February 2018, more than 180 orbital launches were planned for the year, double the 90 orbital rockets that flew in 2017. Although the space industry is growing, many of those missions are likely to be delayed.

Orbital launches[edit]

Date and time (UTC) Rocket Launch site LSP
Payload Operator Orbit Function Decay (UTC) Outcome
Remarks

January[edit]

8 January
01:00
United States Falcon 9 Full Thrust United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX
United States Zuma (USA-280)[16] Unnamed U.S. government agency Low Earth Classified 8 January Launch success, satellite status classified
There were unconfirmed reports that the Zuma satellite failed to separate from the second stage due to an issue with the payload adapter provided by Northrop Grumman, who also manufactured the satellite.[13] However, given the classified nature of the mission, there may not be confirmation until declassification. SpaceX and the United States Air Force reviewed the Falcon 9 flight data and saw no issues with the launch vehicle itself that would effect future launches.[14][15]
9 January
03:24
China Long March 2D China Taiyuan LC-9 China CASC
China SuperView / Gaojing-1 03 Beijing Space View Technology Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
China SuperView / Gaojing-1 04 Beijing Space View Technology Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
11 January
23:18
China Long March 3B / YZ-1 China Xichang LC-2 China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M7 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
China BeiDou-3 M8 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
12 January
03:58
India PSLV-XL India Satish Dhawan FLP India ISRO
India Cartosat-2F ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
India MicroSat-TD ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
India INS-1C ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
Canada LEO Vantage 1 Telesat Low Earth (SSO) Communications In orbit Operational
Finland ICEYE X1 ICEYE Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
France PicSat Paris Observatory Low Earth (SSO) Astronomy In orbit Operational
United Kingdom Carbonite-2 Surrey Satellite Technology Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
South Korea CANYVAL-X 1, 2 Yonsei University, NASA Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
South Korea CNUSail-1 CNU Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
South Korea KAUSAT 5 Korea Aerospace University Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
South Korea STEP Cube Lab Chosun University Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
United States Arkyd 6A Planetary Resources Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
United States Landmapper-BC
(Corvus-BC) 3 v2
Astro Digital Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
United States Lemur-2 x4[20] Spire Global Low Earth Earth observation In orbit Operational
United States Flock-3p' x 4 Planet Labs Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
United States MicroMAS 2a MIT SSL Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
United States Tyvak 61C Tyvak Nano-Satellite Systems Low Earth (SSO) Astronomy In orbit Operational
United States DemoSat 2 ? Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
United States Fox 1D AMSAT Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
United States SpaceBEE x 4 ? Low Earth (SSO) Communications In orbit Operational
United States CICERO 7 GeoOptics Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
PSLV-C40 mission successfully carried and deployed 31 satellites.[17][18][19]
12 January
22:11
United States Delta IV M+(5,2) United States Vandenberg SLC-6 United States United Launch Alliance
United States NROL-47 / Topaz-5[21] / USA-281 US Air Force LEO (retrograde) Reconnaissance In orbit Operational
Last flight of Delta IV M+(5,2) variant.
13 January
07:20
China Long March 2D China Jiuquan China CASC
China LKW-3 CAS Low Earth Earth observation In orbit Operational
17 January
21:06:11
Japan Epsilon Japan Uchinoura Japan JAXA
Japan ASNARO-2 NEC Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
19 January
04:12
China Long March 11[22] China Jiuquan LA-4/SLS-2 China CASC
China Jilin-1 07
(Lingqiao-07)
CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
China Jilin-1 08
(Lingqiao-08)
CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
China Star of Enlai/
Huai'an Hao
Huai'an Youth Comprehensive Development Base Low Earth (SSO) Technology/Education In orbit Operational
China Xiaoxiang 2 SpaceTY Aerospace Co. Low Earth (SSO) Stabilization technology In orbit Operational
China Quantutong-1
(QTT-1)
Full-chart Location Network Co.
(Quan Tu Tong Co.)
Low Earth (SSO) Communications In orbit Operational
Canada Kepler 2[23] Kepler Communications Low Earth (SSO) Communications In orbit Operational
100th launch from Jiuquan. Carried and deployed 6 satellites in total.
20 January
00:48
United States Atlas V 411 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States SBIRS GEO-4 (USA-282) U.S. Air Force Geosynchronous Missile warning In orbit Operational
21 January
01:30
New Zealand Electron New Zealand Rocket Lab Launch Complex 1 United States Rocket Lab
Still Testing Rocket Lab Low Earth Orbital flight test In orbit Operational
United States Flock-2 (Dove Pioneer)[25] Planet Labs Low Earth Earth observation In orbit Operational
United States Lemur-2-72[26] Spire Global Low Earth Earth observation In orbit Operational
United States Lemur-2-73 Spire Global Low Earth Earth observation In orbit Operational
New Zealand Humanity Star Rocket Lab Low Earth Dummy Satellite In orbit Operational
An unannounced satellite "Humanity Star", purported to be the “brightest thing in the night sky,” was launched together with other payloads.[24]
25 January
05:39
China Long March 2C China Xichang LC-3 China CASC
China Yaogan-30 J CAS Low Earth Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
China Yaogan-30 K CAS Low Earth Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
China Yaogan-30 L CAS Low Earth Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
China NanoSat-1A[27] CAS Low Earth Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
25 January
22:20
European Union Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
Luxembourg SES-14 / United StatesGOLD SES S.A. Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Partial launch failure / Operational[31]
United Arab Emirates Al Yah-3 Yahsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Partial launch failure / Operational
Ariane 5 flight VA241: due to programming errors in the on-board computer[28] the satellites were placed on an off-nominal orbit.[29] Both payloads are undergoing corrective maneuvers and will be on line in August [30]
31 January
21:25
United States Falcon 9 Full Thrust United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX
Luxembourg SES-16 / GovSat-1 SES S.A. Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Re-used booster B1032 recovered from the NROL-76 mission in May 2017. This rocket flew in its expendable configuration. Following a successful experimental ocean landing, the booster unexpectedly remained intact. A recovery attempt was not made and the booster was subsequently destroyed.[32]

February[edit]

1 February
02:07
Russia Soyuz-2.1a / Fregat-M Russia Vostochny Site 1S[33] Russia Roscosmos
Russia Kanopus-V No.3 Roscosmos Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
Russia Kanopus-V No.4 Roscosmos Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
Germany S-Net 1–4[34] TU Berlin Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration (inter-satellite communications) In orbit Operational
United States Lemur-2 x4 Spire Global Low Earth Earth observation In orbit Operational
Russia Auriga[35] Dauria Aerospace Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
2 February
07:50
China Long March 2D[36] China Jiuquan SLS-2 China CASC
China Italy CSES / Zhangheng-1[37] CNSA / ASI Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
China Fengmaniu 1 CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
Denmark GOMX 4A GOMSpace, Danish Ministry of Defence Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
Denmark GOMX 4B GOMSpace, ESA Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
Argentina ÑuSat 4 Satellogic Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
Argentina ÑuSat 5 Satellogic Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
China Shaonian Xing[38] China Association for Science and Technology Low Earth (SSO) Communications In orbit Operational
3 February
05:03
Japan SS-520 Japan Uchinoura Japan JAXA
Japan TRICOM-1R University of Tokyo Low Earth Technology demonstration In orbit Operational[39]
The smallest rocket to successfully launch a satellite. Re-flight after a launch failure in January 2017
6 February
20:45
United States Falcon Heavy United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster SpaceX Heliocentric Flight test In orbit Successful
Maiden test flight of Falcon Heavy re-using two first-stage boosters. The two side boosters successfully touched down at the landing zones in Cape Canaveral, however the middle booster failed to land on the automated drone ship.[40] The test payload was launched in a heliocentric orbit with an aphelion of 1.70 AU, just beyond the orbit of Mars.[41]
12 February
05:10
China Long March 3B / YZ-1[42] China Xichang LC-2 China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M3 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
China BeiDou-3 M4 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
13 February
8:13
Russia Soyuz-2.1a Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress MS-08 / 69P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics In orbit Operational
22 February
14:17
United States Falcon 9 Full Thrust United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
Spain Paz Hisdesat Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
United States Microsat-2a SpaceX Low Earth Technology Demonstration In orbit Operational
United States Microsat-2b SpaceX Low Earth Technology Demonstration In orbit Operational
Multiple smaller secondary payloads will also launch on the Falcon 9 rocket. Re-using a first-stage booster. This rocket flew in its expendable configuration so the first-stage booster was not recovered.
25 February
04:00–06:00[43]
Japan H-IIA 202 Japan Tanegashima LA-Y1 Japan MHI
Japan IGS-Optical 6 CSICE Low Earth (SSO) Reconnaissance  
25 February
05:35–07:35[44]
United States Falcon 9 Full Thrust United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX
Spain Hispasat 30W-6[45] Hispasat Geosynchronous Communications  
February (TBD)[46] China ?? China Taiyuan China CASC
China Taurus-1 Aerospace System Engineering Research Institute of Shanghai Low Earth (SSO)  

March[edit]

1 March[47] New Zealand Electron New Zealand Rocket Lab Launch Complex 1 United States Rocket Lab
United States ANDESITE Boston University Center for Space Physics Low Earth Earth observation  
United States CeREs NASA Low Earth Earth observation  
United States CHOMPTT NASA, UFL, Stanford University, KACST Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States CubeSail 1, 2 University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States Da Vinci North Idaho STEM Charter Academy Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States GeoStare Tyvak Nano-Satellite Systems Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States ISX NASA Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States NMTSat New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States RSat-P US Naval Academy Satellite Lab Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States Shields-1 NASA Highly elliptical Technology demonstration  
United States STF-1 NASA, WVU, WVSGC Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States TOMSat R³ (AeroCube 11) The Aerospace Corporation Low Earth Technology demonstration  
Launch for NASA's ELaNa program.
1/2 March[48]
22:02-00:02
United States Atlas V 541 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States GOES-S NESDIS Geosynchronous Meteorology  
6 March[48] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
Luxembourg O3b × 4 SES S.A. Medium Earth Communications  
15 March[46] China Long March 3B/E China Xichang China CASC
China Apstar 6C APT Satellite Holdings Geosynchronous Communications  
20 March[49] European Union Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
Japan Superbird-B3 / DSN-1 JSAT / DSN / JSDF Geosynchronous Communications  
United Kingdom HYLAS-4 Avanti Geosynchronous Communications  
20 March[48]
15:08
United States Falcon 9 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
United States Iridium NEXT 41–50 Iridium Low Earth Communications  
Will re-use a first-stage booster.[50]
21 March[48] Russia Soyuz-FG Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz MS-08 / 54S Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 55/56  
Manned flight with three cosmonauts
22 March[51] India PSLV-XL India Satish Dhawan FLP India ISRO
India IRNSS-1I ISRO Geosynchronous Navigation  
30 March[52] United States Falcon 9 Full Thrust United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Bangladesh Bangabandhu-1 BTRC Geosynchronous Communications  
Late March (TBD) Russia Soyuz-2-1v Russia Plesetsk Russia Roscosmos
Kosmos (number TBD, payload possibly called EMKA)[53] Roscosmos  
March (TBD)[54] India GSLV Mk II India Satish Dhawan SLP India ISRO
India GSAT-6A ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
March (TBD)[54] India PSLV-CA India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India Cartosat-3 ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
March (TBD)[46] China Landspace-1 Landspace Technology Corporation
 
March (TBD)[46] China Long March 2D China Jiuquan China CASC
China LKW-4 CAS Low Earth Earth observation  
March (TBD)[46] China Long March 3B / YZ-1[42] China Xichang China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M5 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
China BeiDou-3 M6 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
Early 2018 (TBD)[55] United States LauncherOne United States Cosmic Girl, Mojave United States Virgin Galactic
United States To be announced Virgin Galactic TBA Flight test  
Maiden orbital flight.
Q1 (TBD)[46] China Kuaizhou 1A China Jiuquan SLS-E1[56] China CASIC
China Jilin-1 09 CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Q1 (TBD)[46] China Kuaizhou 1A China Jiuquan SLS-E1[56] China CASIC
China Jilin-1 10 CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Q1 (TBD)[46] China Kuaizhou 1A China Jiuquan SLS-E1[56] China CASIC
China Jilin-1 11 CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Q1 (TBD)[46] China Kuaizhou 1A China Jiuquan SLS-E1[56] China CASIC
China Jilin-1 12 CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Q1 (TBD)[46] China Long March 3B China Xichang China CASC
Sri Lanka SupremeSat II SupremeSAT Geosynchronous Communications  
Q1 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-M 759 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Q1 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-K 16 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Q1 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-K2 213 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  

April[edit]

2 April[52]
20:30
United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX
United States SpaceX CRS-14 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
12 April[48] United States Atlas V 551 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States AFSPC-11 U.S. Air Force ? Communications (military)  
United States EAGLE[57] Air Force Research Laboratory ? Technology experiments (Space Test Program)  
14 April[48] United States Falcon 9 Block 5[60] United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
United States Iridium NEXT 51–55 Iridium Low Earth Communications  
Germany GRACE-FO 1, 2 DLR Low Earth Gravitational science  
DLR arranged a rideshare of GRACE-FO on a Falcon 9 with Iridium following the cancellation of their Dnepr launch contract in 2015.[58] Iridium CEO Matt Desch disclosed in September 2017 that GRACE-FO would be launched on the sixth Iridium NEXT mission.[59] Possibly maiden flight of the Falcon 9 Block 5 variant.[60]
16 April[44] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States TESS NASA HEO Space observatory  
22 April[53] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia RVSN RF
Russia Blagovest-12L VKS Geosynchronous Communications (military)  
25 April[53] Russia Rokot / Briz-KM Russia Plesetsk Site 133/3 European Union / Russia Eurockot
European Union Sentinel-3B ESA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
April (TBD)[51] China Long March 4C China Taiyuan LA-9[61] China CASC
China Gaofen 5 CAST Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
April (TBD)[48] European Union Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
India GSAT-11[62] ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
Azerbaijan Azerspace 2 /
United States Intelsat 38[63]
Azercosmos / Intelsat Geosynchronous Communications  
April (TBD)[48] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Luxembourg SES-12 SES S.A. Geosynchronous Communications  
April (TBD)[54] India GSLV Mk II India Satish Dhawan SLP India ISRO
India Chandrayaan 2 ISRO Selenocentric Lunar orbiter, lander and rover  
April (TBD)[54] India GSLV Mk III India Satish Dhawan SLP India ISRO
India GSAT-29 ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
Second orbital flight.

May[edit]

1 May[48] United States Antares 230 United States MARS LP-0A United States Orbital ATK
United States Cygnus CRS OA-9E NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
5 May
11:10[48]
United States Atlas V 401 United States Vandenberg SLC-3E United States ULA
United States InSight NASA / JPL Martian Surface Mars lander  
12th mission of the Discovery program. Mars lander mission dedicated to geological and seismological studies of the planet.[64]
May (TBD)[47] New Zealand Electron New Zealand Rocket Lab Launch Complex 1 United States Rocket Lab
United States MX-1E-1 Moon Express Low Earth[65] Lunar lander  
An entry to win the Google Lunar X Prize.[65]
May (TBD)[52] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Indonesia Telkom 4[66] Telkom Indonesia Geosynchronous Communications  
May (TBD)[46] China Long March 3C / YZ-1 China Xichang China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M13 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
China BeiDou-3 M14 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
May (TBD)[46] China Long March 4C China Xichang[61] China CASC
China Chang'e 4 Relay CNSA Earth–Moon L2, halo orbit Communications  
China DSLWP-A1 CNSA Selenocentric, elliptical orbit Radio astronomy  
China DSLWP-A2 CNSA Selenocentric, elliptical orbit Radio astronomy  
The relay satellite will support communications from the Chang'e 4 rover exploring the far side of the Moon.

June[edit]

6 June[52] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States SpaceX CRS-15 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
13 June[53] Russia Soyuz-FG Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz MS-09 / 55S Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 56/57  
Manned flight with three cosmonauts
June (TBD)[58] United States Falcon 9 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
United States Iridium NEXT 56-65 Iridium Low Earth Communications  
June (TBD)[67] United States Falcon 9 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
Argentina SAOCOM 1A[68] CONAE Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Brazil ITASAT-1 ITA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
June (TBD)[48] United States Falcon Heavy United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States STP-2 U.S. Air Force Low Earth, Medium Earth[69] Technology demo  
Q2 (TBD)[70] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Canada Telstar 18V[71] Telesat Geosynchronous Communications  
Q2 (TBD)[70] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Canada Telstar 19V[71] Telesat Geosynchronous Communications  
Q2 (TBD)[48] United States Pegasus-XL Marshall Islands Stargazer, Kwajalein Atoll United States Orbital ATK
United States ICON NASA Low Earth Ionosphere research  
Q2 (TBD)[53] Russia Rokot / Briz-KM Russia Plesetsk Site 133/3 Russia RVSN RF
Russia Gonets-M 14[72] Gonets SatCom Low Earth Communications  
Russia Gonets-M 15 Gonets SatCom Low Earth Communications  
Russia Gonets-M 16 Gonets SatCom Low Earth Communications  
Russia BLITS-M Roscosmos Low Earth Laser ranging  
Q2 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-K 17 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Summer (TBD)[74] United States Falcon 9 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
United States SSO-A / SHERPA
~90 small satellites
Spaceflight Industries Low Earth (SSO) Satellite dispenser  
United States SkySat × 2[74] Planet Labs Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Germany Eu:CROPIS[75] DLR Low Earth (SSO) Life sciences  
United States ORS-6[75] USAF Low Earth (SSO) Meteorology (experimental)  
United States STPSat 5[75] USAF STP Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
South Korea NEXTSat 1[75] KAIST Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
Kazakhstan KazSTSAT[75] Ghalam LLP Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
United States BlackSky Global 1-4[75] BlackSky Global Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
United States HawkEye Pathfinder 1, 2, 3[75] HawkEye 360 Low Earth (SSO) SIGINT, traffic monitoring  
United States Flock-v (x?)[75] Planet Labs Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
United States ORS-7 (Polar Scout 1, 2)[75] USCG, DHS Low Earth (SSO) Communications  
United States COPPER 2[75] St. Louis University Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
United States Audacy Zero[75] Audacy Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
United States Orbital Reflector[75] Nevada Museum of Art Low Earth (SSO) Art  
United States Fox 1C[75] AMSAT, VPI, Vanderbilt University Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
Thailand KNACKSAT[75] KMUTNB Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
United States Elysium Star II[75] Elysium Space Low Earth (SSO) Space burial  
Jordan JY1-Sat[75] ? Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
The SSO-A "dedicated rideshare" mission will deliver roughly 90 payloads with the SHERPA dispenser.[73]

July[edit]

10 July[48] Russia Soyuz-2.1a Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress MS-09 / 70P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
31 July
14:07[48]
United States Delta IV Heavy United States Cape Canaveral SLC-37B United States ULA
United States Parker Solar Probe NASA Heliocentric Heliophysics  
Heliophysics observation mission planned to make in situ studies of the Sun's outer corona at a perihelion distance of 8.5 solar radii (5.9 million kilometers) – the closest any spacecraft will come to the Sun to date.
July (TBD)[48] European Union Ariane 5 ES France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
European Union Galileo FOC 19, 20, 21, 22 ESA Medium Earth Navigation  
Third Galileo launch with Ariane 5 (10th overall), carrying Tara, Samuel, Anna, and Ellen.
July (TBD)[54] India PSLV-CA India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India Oceansat-3 ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Oceanography  
July (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-M 760 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
July (TBD)[76] United States Vector-R United States MARS LP-0B/Kodiak United States Vector Space Systems
TBD Low Earth (?) Flight test  
First orbital flight of Vector-R rocket.
July (TBD)[52] United States Falcon 9 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
Canada RADARSAT Constellation[77] Canadian Space Agency Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  

August[edit]

19 August[51] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
Jersey OneWeb × 10 (flight 1) OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
27 August[48] United States Atlas V N22[78] United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States Boe-OFT Boeing / NASA Low Earth (ISS) Flight test  
Boeing Orbital Flight Test of CST-100 Starliner as part of Commercial Crew Development program. 30-day robotic mission.
August (TBD)[58] United States Falcon 9 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
United States Iridium NEXT 66-75 Iridium Low Earth Communications  
August (TBD)[80] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States SpX-DM1 SpaceX / NASA Low Earth (ISS) Flight test  
Crew Dragon Demo 1: Planned test of Dragon 2 as part of Commercial Crew Development program. Possibly maiden flight of the Falcon 9 Block 5 variant.[79]
August (TBD)[48] Japan H-IIB Japan Tanegashima LA-Y2 Japan MHI
Japan HTV-7 JAXA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
August (TBD)[46] China Long March 3A China Xichang LA-2 China CASC
China BeiDou IGSO-7 CNSA IGSO Navigation  
August (TBD)[81] United States LauncherOne United States Cosmic Girl, Mojave United States Virgin Galactic
United States ALBus NASA Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States CACTUS-1 Capitol Technology University Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States CAPE-3 University of Louisiana Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States ExoCube-2 NASA Low Earth Atmospheric research  
United States INCA NMSU Low Earth Ionospheric research  
United States MicroMAS-2b MIT Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States MiTEE-1 University of Michigan Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States PICS 1, 2 Brigham Young University Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States PolarCube Colorado Space Grant Consortium Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States Q-PACE (Cu-PACE) UCF Low Earth Microgravity research  
United States RadFxSat-2 (Fox-1E) AMSAT Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States TechEdSat-7 (TES-7) SJSU, NASA, University of Idaho Low Earth Technology demonstration  
Launch for NASA's ELaNa program.

September[edit]

12 September[51] United States Delta II 7420 United States Vandenberg SLC-2W United States ULA
United States ICESat-2 NASA Low Earth Earth observation  
Last flight of Delta II series; final flight of the Thor rocket series.
14 September[48] Russia Soyuz-FG Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz MS-10 / 56S Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 57/58  
Manned flight with three cosmonauts
17 September[51] Russia Soyuz ST-A / Fregat-M France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
European Union MetOp-C Eumetsat Low Earth (SSO) Meteorology  
26 September[48] United States Delta IV Heavy United States Vandenberg SLC-6 United States United Launch Alliance
United States NROL-71 / Kennen NRO Low Earth Reconnaissance  
September (TBD)[48] United States Falcon 9 Full Thrust United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States GPS IIIA-01 U.S. Air Force Medium Earth Navigation  
September(TBD)[46] China Long March 3C / YZ-1 China Xichang China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M15 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
China BeiDou-3 M16 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
September (TBD)[48] European Union Vega France Kourou ELV France Arianespace
European Union ADM-Aeolus ESA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Q3 (TBD)[46] China Long March 2C China TBD China CASC
China / France CFOSAT CNES / ? Low Earth Earth observation  
Q3 (TBD)[53] Russia Proton-M / DM-03 Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 81/24 Russia Khrunichev
Russia GLONASS-K 18 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Russia GLONASS-K 19 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Russia GLONASS-K 20 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  

October[edit]

5 October[48] European Union Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
European Union Japan BepiColombo ESA / JAXA Mercurian orbit Mercury probes  
Third and final cornerstone mission of the Horizon 2000+ programme. Joint ESA / JAXA Mercury mission consisting of two orbiters, the ESA Mercury Planetary Orbiter and the JAXA Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter
11 October[48] Russia Soyuz-2.1a Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress MS-10 / 71P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
18 October[48] United States Atlas V 531 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States AEHF-4[82] U.S. Air Force Geosynchronous Communications (military)  
October (TBD)[46] China Long March 3C[46] China Xichang China CASC
China BeiDou-3 G1Q CNSA Geosynchronous Navigation  
October (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-M 761 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  

November[edit]

10 November[48] United States Delta IV M+(5,4) United States Cape Canaveral SLC-37B United States ULA
United States WGS-10 U.S. Air Force Geosynchronous Communications  
Last flight of "single stick" Delta IV M+[83]
8 November[84] United States Antares 230 United States MARS LP-0A United States Orbital ATK
United States Cygnus CRS OA-10E NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
15 November[53] Russia Soyuz-FG Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz MS-11 / 57S Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 58/59  
Manned flight with three cosmonauts
16 November[48] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States SpaceX CRS-16 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
November (TBD)[80] United States Atlas V N22[78] United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States Boe-CFT Boeing / NASA Low Earth (ISS) Flight test  
Boeing Crewed Flight Test of CST-100 Starliner as part of Commercial Crew Development program. 14-day manned mission.

December[edit]

15 December[46] China ? China ? China CASC
China BNU-1 Beijing Normal University Polar Earth observation  
December (TBD)[51] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
European Union CHEOPS ESA Low Earth (SSO) Space telescope  
Italy COSMO-SkyMed ASI Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation (radar)  
December (TBD)[46] China Long March 3C / YZ-1 China Xichang China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M17 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
China BeiDou-3 M18 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
December (TBD)[46] China Long March 3B China Xichang China CASC
China Chang'e 4 CNSA Selenocentric Lunar lander  
China's third lunar lander (back-up to Chang'e 3), and the first spacecraft to attempt a soft landing on far side of the Moon.
December (TBD)[80] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States SpX-DM2 SpaceX / NASA Low Earth (ISS) Flight test  
Crew Dragon Demo 2: Crewed flight test of Dragon 2 as part of the Commercial Crew Development program
December (TBD)[53] Russia Proton-M / DM-03 Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Khrunichev
Russia Repei-S  
December (TBD)[53] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Khrunichev
Russia Yenisey-A1 (Luch 4) ? Geosynchronous Communications (experimental)  
Q4 (TBD)[85] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Cayman Islands GiSAT-1 Global-IP Cayman Geosynchronous Communications  
Q4 (TBD)[46] China Long March 3B/E China Xichang China CASC
China APStar 6D APT Satellite Holdings Geosynchronous Communications  
Q4 (TBD)[46] China Long March 5 China Wenchang LC-1 China CASC
China Shijian 18-02 CAST Geosynchronous Communications  
Q4 (TBD)[86] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia United States ILS
France Eutelsat 5 West B Eutelsat Geosynchronous Communications  
United States MEV-1 Orbital ATK Geosynchronous Satellite servicing  
Q4 (TBD)[51] Russia Rokot / Briz-KM Russia Plesetsk Site 133/3 Russia RVSN RF
Russia Geo-IK-2 No.3 (Musson-2) VKS Low Earth Geodesy  
Originally planned on a Soyuz-2-1v, switched to a Rokot in June 2017
Q4 (TBD)[53][87] Russia Proton-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Nauka Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly  
Q4 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-K 15 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Q4 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-K2 214 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Q4 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz-2.1a / Fregat-M Russia Vostochny Site 1S[88] Russia Roscosmos
Russia Kanopus-V No.5 Roscosmos Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Russia Kanopus-V No.6 Roscosmos Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
United States Dove Flock-w × 12 Planet Labs Low Earth Earth observation  

To be determined[edit]

Early 2018 (TBD)[48] United States Falcon Heavy United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
Saudi Arabia ArabSat 6A[89] ArabSat Geosynchronous Communications  
Mid 2018 (TBD)[90] United States Vector-R United States MARS LP-0B[76] United States Vector Space Systems
(TBD) (TBD) (TBD)  
Mid 2018 (TBD)[54] India PSLV India Satish Dhawan FLP India ISRO
United Kingdom SSTL-1 SSTL Low Earth Earth observation  
Late 2018 (TBD)[91] European Union Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
United States / Japan Horizons-3e[a] Intelsat / JSAT Geosynchronous Communications  
H2, 2018 (TBD)[92] European Union Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
United States Intelsat 39[a] Intelsat Geosynchronous Communications  
2018 (TBD)[93] Japan Epsilon Japan Uchinoura Japan JAXA
Vietnam JV-LOTUSat 1 Vietnam Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
2018 (TBD)[94] Japan Epsilon Japan Uchinoura Japan JAXA
Japan Small demo sat 1 JAXA Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
Vietnam MicroDragon[95] VNSC TBD Technology demonstration  
Japan Hodoyoshi-2 (RISESat) University of Tokyo Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Japan OrigamiSat-1 Tokyo Institute of Technology Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
Singapore / Japan AOBA-VELOX 4 Nanyang Technological University, Kyutech Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
2018 (TBD)[96] Japan H-IIA Japan Tanegashima LA-Y1 Japan MHI
Japan GCOM-C2 JAXA Low Earth Earth observation  
2018 (TBD)[97] Japan H-IIA 202 Japan Tanegashima LA-Y1 Japan MHI
Japan GOSAT-2 JAXA Low Earth Earth observation  
United Arab Emirates KhalifaSat EIAST Low Earth Earth observation  
Philippines / Japan Diwata-2b DOST / TU Low Earth Earth observation  
Japan PROITERES-2 Osaka Institute of Technology Low Earth Technology demonstration  
2018 (TBD)[98] United States Atlas V United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States AFSPC-8 U.S. Air Force ? Communications (military)  
2018 (TBD)[98] United States Atlas V 531 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States AEHF-5[82] U.S. Air Force Geosynchronous Communications (military)  
2018 (TBD)[99] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Qatar Es'hail 2[100] Es'hailSat Geosynchronous Communications  
2018 (TBD)[101] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Indonesia PSN-6 PSN Geosynchronous Communications  
2018 (TBD)[102] United States Falcon 9 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
Germany SARah 1 (aktiv)[102] Bundeswehr Low Earth (SSO) Reconnaissance  
2018 (TBD)[103] United States Vector-R United States MARS LP-0B (?) United States Vector Space Systems
United States Landmapper-HD Astro Digital Low Earth Earth observation  
2018 (TBD)[54] India GSLV Mk II India Satish Dhawan SLP India ISRO
India GISAT 1[104] ISRO Geosynchronous Earth observation  
2018 (TBD)[54] India GSLV Mk II India Satish Dhawan SLP India ISRO
India GSAT-7A Indian Air Force Geosynchronous Communications (military)  
2018 (TBD)[54] India GSLV Mk II India Satish Dhawan SLP India ISRO
India NexStar 1, 2[105] Aniara Geosynchronous Communications  
2018 (TBD)[54] India GSLV Mk III India Satish Dhawan SLP India ISRO
India GSAT-20 ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
2018 (TBD)[54] India PSLV India Satish Dhawan FLP India ISRO
United States eXCITe (PTB 1, SeeMee) DARPA Polar orbit Technology demo (satlets)  
2018 (TBD)[54] India PSLV-CA India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
Germany EnMAP DLR / GFZ Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
2018 (TBD)[54] India PSLV-XL India Satish Dhawan FLP India ISRO
India IRNSS-1J ISRO Geosynchronous Navigation  
2018 (TBD)[54] India PSLV-XL India Satish Dhawan FLP India ISRO
India IRNSS-1K ISRO Geosynchronous Navigation  
2018 (TBD)[54] India PSLV-XL India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India RISAT-1A ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation (radar)  
2018 (TBD)[106] China Kuaizhou 11 China Jiuquan China CASIC
China Jilin-1 02A CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
China Sunflower 1A/1B (Xiangrikui 1A/1B) CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
China Ouke-Micro 1 Low Earth (SSO)  
China Tianyi 4 Low Earth (SSO)  
China Zhongwei 1 Low Earth (SSO)  
Maiden flight of Kuaizhou 11 version
2018 (TBD)[81] United States LauncherOne United States Cosmic Girl, Mojave United States Virgin Galactic
United Kingdom To be announced Sky and Space Global Low Earth Communications  
2018 (TBD)[46] China Long March 3A China Xichang[42] China CAST
China Fengyun 2H CMA Geosynchronous Meteorology  
2018 (TBD)[46] China Long March 3B/E China Xichang LC-2 China CASC
China ChinaSat-6C (Zhongxing-6C)[46] China Satcom Geosynchronous Communications  
2018 (TBD)[46] China Long March 3C / YZ-1 China Xichang China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M9 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
China BeiDou-3 M10 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
2018 (TBD)[46] China Long March 3C / YZ-1 China Xichang China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M11 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
China BeiDou-3 M12 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
2018 (TBD)[42] China Long March 3C China Xichang LA-3 China CASC
China BeiDou G8 CNSA Geosynchronous Navigation  
2018 (TBD) [46] China TBD China TBD China TBD
Saudi Arabia Saudisat 5B KACST Space Research Institute Low Earth Earth observation  
2018 (TBD)[48] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia RVSN RF
Russia Blagovest-13L VKS Geosynchronous Communications (military)  
2018 (TBD)[48] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia RVSN RF
Russia Blagovest-14L VKS Geosynchronous Communications (military)  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Khrunichev
Russia Ekspress AMU-3 RSCC Geosynchronous Communications  
Russia Ekspress AMU-7 RSCC Geosynchronous Communications  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Proton-M / DM-03 Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Khrunichev
Russia Elektro-L No.3 Roscosmos Geosynchronous Meteorology  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 81/24 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-K 21 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Russia GLONASS-K 22 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Russia GLONASS-K 23 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Proton-M / DM-03 Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 81/24 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-M 756 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Russia GLONASS-M 757 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Russia GLONASS-M 758 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Khrunichev
Russia Yamal-601 Gazprom Space Systems Geosynchronous Communications  
2018 (TBD)[72] Russia Rokot / Briz-KM Russia Plesetsk Site 133/3 Russia VKS
Russia Gonets-M 17 Gonets SatCom Low Earth Communications  
Russia Gonets-M 18 Gonets SatCom Low Earth Communications  
Russia Gonets-M 19 Gonets SatCom Low Earth Communications  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Arktika-M No.1[107] Roscosmos Molniya Earth observation  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz-2.1a Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia Bars-M 3L VKS Low Earth (SSO) Reconnaissance  
2018 (TBD)[108] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat Russia Vostochny Site 1S Russia Roscosmos
Russia Energia-100 Rostelecom Geosynchronous Communications  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-M 755 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz-2.1a / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Kondor-FKA No.1 Roscosmos Low Earth Reconnaissance  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz-2.1a / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia Meridian 8 (18L) VKO Molniya Communications (military)  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Vostochny Site 1S Russia Roscosmos
Russia Meteor-M N2-2 Roscosmos Low Earth (SSO) Meteorology  
Russia Ionosfera 3, 4 Roscosmos Low Earth (SSO) Ionospheric and magnetospheric research  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz-2.1b Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Resurs-P No.4 Roscosmos Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
Jersey OneWeb × 32 (flight 2) OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
Jersey OneWeb × 32 (flight 3) OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
Jersey OneWeb × 32 (flight 4) OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
Jersey OneWeb × 32 (flight 5) OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
Jersey OneWeb × 32 (flight 6) OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
Jersey OneWeb × 32 (flight 7) OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
2018 (TBD)[53] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
Jersey OneWeb × 32 (flight 8) OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
2018 (TBD)[109] European Union Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
France Eutelsat 7C[109][a] Eutelsat Geosynchronous Communications  
2018 (TBD)[110] European Union Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
South Korea GEO-KOMPSAT-2A[a] KARI Geosynchronous Meteorology  
2018 (TBD)[111] European Union Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
Cyprus Hellas Sat 4 / Saudi Arabia SaudiGeoSat-1[a] Hellas-Sat / ArabSat Geosynchronous Communications  
2018 (TBD)[112] European Union Vega France Kourou ELV France Arianespace
United Arab Emirates Falcon Eye 1 UAE Armed Forces Low Earth IMINT (Reconnaissance)  
2018 (TBD)[113] European Union Vega France Kourou ELV France Arianespace
Italy PRISMA Italian Space Agency Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
France TARANIS CNES Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
European Union Small Satellites Mission Service ESA TBD Technology demo  
2018 (TBD)[53] Ukraine Zenit-3F / Fregat-SB Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 45/1 Russia Roscosmos
Ukraine Lybid 1[114] Ukrkosmos (SSAU) Geosynchronous Communications  

Suborbital flights[edit]

Date and time (UTC) Rocket Launch site LSP
Payload Operator Orbit Function Decay (UTC) Outcome
Remarks
18 January
05:53
India Agni V India Integrated Test Range Launch Complex IV India DRDO
DRDO Suborbital Missile test 18 January Successful
Apogee: ~800 kilometres (500 mi)
19 January
12:17
Canada Black Brant IX United States Poker Flat Research Range United States NASA
United States DXL-3 U of M Suborbital Astronomy 19 January Successful
Apogee: 230 kilometres (140 mi)[115]
26 January
14:11:15
United States Terrier-Improved Orion United States Poker Flat Research Range United States NASA
United States Super Soaker ASTRA Suborbital Atmospheric 26 January Successful
Apogee: ~160 kilometres (99 mi)
26 January
14:48:00
United States Terrier-Improved Orion United States Poker Flat Research Range United States NASA
United States Super Soaker ASTRA Suborbital Atmospheric 26 January Successful
Apogee: ~97 kilometres (60 mi)
26 January
14:49:30
United States Terrier-Improved Orion United States Poker Flat Research Range United States NASA
United States Super Soaker ASTRA Suborbital Atmospheric 26 January Successful
Apogee: ~160 kilometres (99 mi)
31 January United States IRBM ? United States C-17, Pacific Ocean United States MDA
United States FTM-29 Target MDA Suborbital SM-3 Block IIA target 31 January Successful
Apogee: 300 kilometres (190 mi)
31 January United States SM-3 Block IIA United States Kauai United States US Navy
United States FTM-29 Interceptor US Navy Suborbital ABM test 31 January Failure
Test of a land-based Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) weapon system, failed to intercept the target
5 February China B-611? China Shuangchengzi ChinaPLA
PLA Suborbital ABM target 5 February Successful
Target
5 February China SC-19 China Korla China PLA
PLA Suborbital ABM test 5 February Successful
Interceptor, successful intercept[116]
6 February
03:00
India Agni-I India Integrated Test Range India IDRDL
IDRDL Suborbital Missile test 6 February Successful
Apogee: ~500 kilometres (310 mi)?
19 February
02:30
Israel Arrow III Israel Negev Israel IAF
IAI/IDF Suborbital Flight test 19 February Successful
Successful flight test of the Arrow-III weapon system[117]
2018 (TBD)
(after SpX-DM1)[80][79]
United States Falcon 9 United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States Dragon 2 SpaceX Suborbital Test flight  
In-flight abort test
2018 (TBD) United States Orion Abort Test Booster United States Cape Canaveral SLC-46 United States Orbital ATK
United States Orion Ascent Abort-2 NASA Suborbital Test flight  
In-flight abort test under the highest aerodynamic loads. A specific booster repurposed from a LGM-118 Peacekeeper missile is being developed for this mission.[118]
H1, 2018 United States Demonstrator-3 United States Spaceport America, New Mexico United States ARCA Space Corporation
United States ARCA Space Corporation Suborbital Test flight  
First test flight of a linear aerospike engine
Q4 (TBD) United Kingdom Skyrora 1 United Kingdom United Kingdom Skyrora
United Kingdom To be announced Skyrora Scotland Suborbital Test flight  

Deep-space rendezvous[edit]

Date (GMT) Spacecraft Event Remarks
7 February Juno 11th perijove of Jupiter
1 April Juno 12th perijove of Jupiter
24 May Juno 13th perijove of Jupiter
16 July Juno 14th perijove of Jupiter
July Hayabusa 2 Arrival at asteroid Ryugu
August OSIRIS-REx Arrival at asteroid Bennu
7 September Juno 15th perijove of Jupiter
29 October Juno 16th perijove of Jupiter
21 December Juno 17th perijove of Jupiter

Extravehicular activities (EVAs)[edit]

Start Date/Time Duration End Time Spacecraft Crew Remarks
23 January
11:49
7 hours
24 minutes
19:13 Expedition 54
ISS Quest
2 February
15:34
8 hours
13 minutes
23:47 Expedition 54
ISS Pirs
  • Dismantling Lira Electronics Assembly
  • Installation of upgraded Electronics Unit
  • Jettisoning of removed Unit
  • Test Exposure Unit Retrieval
  • Biorisk Retrieval
  • Foot Restraint Relocation
16 February
12:00
5 hours
57 minutes
17:57 Expedition 54
ISS Quest

Orbital launch statistics[edit]

By country[edit]

For the purposes of this section, the yearly tally of orbital launches by country assigns each flight to the country of origin of the rocket, not to the launch services provider or the spaceport. For example, Soyuz launches by Arianespace in Kourou are counted under Russia because Soyuz-2 is a Russian rocket.

China: 7 Europe: 1 India: 1 Iran: 0 Israel: 0 Japan: 2 North Korea: 0 New Zealand: 1 Russia: 2 Ukraine: 0 USA: 6Circle frame.svg
Country Launches Successes Failures Partial
failures
Remarks
 China 7 7 0 0
 Europe 1 0 0 1
 India 1 1 0 0
 Japan 2 2 0 0
 New Zealand 1 1 0 0
 Russia 2 2 0 0 Includes Soyuz launches from Kourou
 United States 6 6 0 0 Zuma launch was a success. Satellite status is unknown because mission details are classified
World 20 19 0 1

By rocket[edit]

By family[edit]

Family Country Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Antares  United States 0 0 0 0
Ariane  Europe 1 0 0 1
Atlas  United States 1 1 0 0
Delta  United States 1 1 0 0
Electron  New Zealand 1 1 0 0
Epsilon  Japan 1 1 0 0
Falcon  United States 4 4 0 0
H-II (H-IIA and H-IIB)  Japan 0 0 0 0
Kuaizhou  China 0 0 0 0
Long March  China 7 7 0 0
PSLV  India 1 1 0 0
R-7  Russia 2 2 0 0
S-Series  Japan 1 1 0 0
Universal Rocket  Russia 0 0 0 0
Vega  Europe 0 0 0 0

By type[edit]

Rocket Country Family Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Antares 200  United States Antares 0 0 0 0
Ariane 5  Europe Ariane 1 0 0 1
Atlas V  United States Atlas 1 1 0 0
Delta II  United States Delta 0 0 0 0
Delta IV  United States Delta 1 1 0 0 Includes Delta IV Heavy derivative
Electron  New Zealand Electron 1 1 0 0
Epsilon  Japan Epsilon 1 1 0 0
Falcon 9  United States Falcon 3 3 0 0
Falcon Heavy  United States Falcon 1 1 0 0
GSLV  India SLV 0 0 0 0
GSLV Mk III  India SLV 0 0 0 0
Kuaizhou  China Kuaizhou 0 0 0 0
PSLV  India SLV 1 1 0 0
H-IIA  Japan H-II 0 0 0 0
H-IIB  Japan H-II 0 0 0 0
Long March 2  China Long March 4 4 0 0
Long March 3  China Long March 2 2 0 0
Long March 4  China Long March 0 0 0 0
Long March 5  China Long March 0 0 0 0
Long March 11  China Long March 1 1 0 0
Proton  Russia Universal Rocket 0 0 0 0
Soyuz  Russia R-7 0 0 0 0
Soyuz-2  Russia R-7 2 2 0 0
SS-520  Japan S-Series 1 1 0 0
UR-100 (Rockot)  Russia Universal Rocket 0 0 0 0
Vega  Europe Vega 0 0 0 0

By configuration[edit]

By spaceport[edit]

Site Country Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Baikonur  Kazakhstan 1 1 0 0
Cape Canaveral  United States 3 3 0 0
Jiuquan  China 3 3 0 0
Kennedy  United States 1 1 0 0
Kourou  France 1 0 0 1
Mahia  New Zealand 1 1 0 0
MARS  United States 0 0 0 0
Plesetsk  Russia 0 0 0 0
Satish Dhawan  India 1 1 0 0
Taiyuan  China 1 1 0 0
Tanegashima  Japan 0 0 0 0
Uchinoura  Japan 2 2 0 0
Vandenberg  United States 2 2 0 0
Vostochny  Russia 1 1 0 0
Wenchang  China 0 0 0 0
Xichang  China 3 3 0 0

By orbit[edit]

Orbital regime Launches Achieved Not achieved Accidentally
achieved
Remarks
Transatmospheric 0 0 0 0
Low Earth 14 13 1 0
Geosynchronous / transfer 3 2 0 1
Medium Earth 2 2 0 0
High Earth 0 0 0 0
Heliocentric orbit 1 1 0 0 Including planetary transfer orbits

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Ariane 5 carries two satellites per mission; manifested payloads still need to be paired.

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