2019–21 ICC World Test Championship

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2019–21 ICC World Test Championship
Dates1 August 2019 – 14 June 2021
Administrator(s)International Cricket Council
Cricket formatTest cricket
Tournament format(s)League and Final
Participants9
Matches played72

The 2019–21 ICC World Test Championship is the inaugural edition of the ICC World Test Championship of Test cricket.[1] It started from 1 August 2019 with the first Test of the 2019 Ashes series,[2] and will finish with a final at Lord's in England in June 2021.[3]

It comes nearly a decade after the International Cricket Council (ICC) first approved the idea for a World Test Championship in 2010, and following two cancelled attempts to hold the inaugural competition in 2013 and 2017.

It features nine of the twelve Test playing nations,[4][5] each of whom will play a Test series against six of the other eight teams. Each series consists of between two and five matches, so although all teams will play six series (three at home and three away), they will not play the same number of Tests. Each team will be able to score a maximum of 120 points from each series and the two teams with the most points at the end of the league stage will contest the final.[6] In the case of a draw or a tie in the final, the two teams playing the final will be declared joint champions.[6]

Some of the Test series in this Championship are part of a longer ongoing series, such as the 2019 Ashes series.[6] Also, some of these nine teams will play additional Test matches during this period which are not part of this Championship, as part of the ICC Future Tours Programme for 2018–23, mainly to give games to the three Test playing sides not taking part in this competition.[6] On 29 July 2019, the ICC officially launched the World Test Championship.[7]

Format[edit]

The tournament will be played over two years. Each team will play six other opponents, three at home and three away. Each series will consist of between two and five Test matches. Therefore all participants will not play the same number of Tests, but will play the same number of series. At the end of the league stage the top two teams will play a final in England in June 2021.[8] Each match will be scheduled for a duration of five days.

Point scoring[edit]

The ICC decided that the same number of points will be available from each series, regardless of series length, so that countries that play fewer Tests are not disadvantaged. It also decided that points will not be awarded for series results, but for match results only. These will be split equally between all the matches in the series, regardless of whether or not a match is a dead rubber.[9] In a five-match series, therefore, 20% of the points will be available each match, while in a two-match series, 50% of the points will be available each match.

Therefore, depending on whether the series is 2, 3, 4 or 5 matches long, the number of points awarded for a single match win will be a half, a third, a quarter, or a fifth of the maximum possible from the series. The ICC also decided that a tie should be worth half of a win and that a draw should be worth a third of a win.[10] This all means that after each match, a side could be awarded a half, a third, a quarter, a fifth, a sixth, an eighth, a ninth, a tenth, a twelfth or a fifteenth of the total points available from the series, depending on the result and how many matches the series happens to consist of. Ultimately, this means a figure for the total points available from the series needs to be picked very carefully, as not many numbers give all integers when split into all these different fractions (360 does). Being a highly composite number, when 120 is split into all these fractions, an integer is obtained in all cases except one - the points awarded for a draw in a 3-match series should be 13​13 (a third of a third of 120), but the ​13 has been dropped.

Each series will therefore carry a maximum of 120 points with points distributed as follows.

Distributions of points in ICC World Test Championship[11]
Matches in series Points for a win Points for a tie Points for a draw Points for a defeat
2 60 30 20 0
3 40 20 13 0
4 30 15 10 0
5 24 12 8 0

A team that is behind the required over-rate at the end of a match will have two competition points deducted for each over it is behind.[12]

Participants[edit]

The nine Full members of the ICC who will participate are:

Since each team is scheduled to play only six of the eight possible opponents, the ICC has been able to announce that India and Pakistan will not play against each other in the first and second editions of the tournament.

The three Full members of the ICC who will not participate are:

These are the three lowest ranked full members of the ICC. They have been included in the ICC Future Tours Programme; they will play a number of Test matches during this period against Championship participants and each other (12 each for Ireland and Afghanistan, 21 for Zimbabwe[13]) but these will have no bearing on the Championship.[14]

Schedule[edit]

The schedule for the World Test Championship was announced by the ICC on 20 June 2018, as part of the 2018–2023 Future Tours Programme.[15]

Home \ Away Australia Bangladesh England India New Zealand Pakistan South Africa Sri Lanka West Indies Cricket Board
Australia  4 matches 3 matches 2–0 [2]
Bangladesh  2 matches 2 matches 3 matches
England  2–2 [5] 3 matches 3 matches
India  2–0 [2] 5 matches 3–0 [3]
New Zealand  2 matches 2 matches 2 matches
Pakistan  2 matches 2 matches 2 matches
South Africa  3 matches 4 matches 2 matches
Sri Lanka  3 matches 2 matches 1–1 [2]
West Indies  0–2 [2] 2 matches 2 matches
Updated to match(es) played on 2 December 2019. The number in square brackets is the number of matches in the series. Source: icc-cricket
Colours: Blue = home team win; Yellow = draw; Red = away team win.

Therefore the total number of matches played by each team (home and away) in this tournament, and the two countries that each side will not face in this tournament, are as follows. (Note this is not the total Test matches played by each team during this period, as some countries will play further matches during this period which are not part of this Championship, as part of the ICC Future Tours Programme for 2018–23. Some of these may be against the opponents they do not play in this Championship.)

Team Total matches Will not play against
 Australia 19  Sri Lanka and  West Indies
 Bangladesh 14  England and  South Africa
 England 22  Bangladesh and  New Zealand
 India 18  Pakistan and  Sri Lanka
 New Zealand 13  England and  South Africa
 Pakistan 13  India and  West Indies
 South Africa 16  Bangladesh and  New Zealand
 Sri Lanka 13  Australia and  India
 West Indies 14  Australia and  Pakistan

Variations in strength of opponents[edit]

Rather than being a full round-robin tournament in which everyone plays everyone else equally, each team plays only six of the other eight. Each team plays a different set of opponents, and so can be considered as having an easier or harder schedule. For example, New Zealand do not play England and South Africa, two of the highest-ranked teams, whereas Australia do not play Sri Lanka and West Indies, two of the lowest ranked teams. Also, while there is a balance with all teams playing three series at home and three series away, this is not the case with the individual matches. For example, India play ten Tests at home and eight away, whereas the West Indies play just six at home and eight away.

Four of the highest-ranked nations (India, England, Australia and South Africa) all play each other, in some of the longest series of the Championship, and the teams these four nations do not play are generally lower-ranked nations.

All the series are mutually agreed between the two nations involved,[16] this has led to allegations that the schedule has been agreed based on what will provide the biggest television audiences, and therefore television receipts,[17] rather than selecting an even spread of teams.

League stage[edit]

League table[edit]

Pos Team Series Matches PC

PCT

Points RpW Ratio
P W L D P W L D T
1  India 3 3 0 0 7 7 0 0 0 360 100.0 360 2.835
2  Australia 2 1 0 1 7 4 2 1 0 240 73.3 176 1.426
3  New Zealand 1 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 120 50.0 60 1.401
4  Sri Lanka 1 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 120 50.0 60 0.714
5  England 1 0 0 1 5 2 2 1 0 120 46.7 56 0.864
6  West Indies 1 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 120 00.0 0 0.421
7  Bangladesh 1 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 120 00.0 0 0.312
8  Pakistan 1 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 120 00.0 0 0.310
9  South Africa 1 0 1 0 3 0 3 0 0 120 00.0 0 0.304
Last updated: 02 December 2019. Source:International Cricket Council[18]
  • Top two teams advance to The Final to be played at Lord's, London on 10-14 June, 2021.

If two teams are tied on points, the team that won more series shall be ranked higher. If teams are still equal, then the team with the higher runs per wicket ratio shall be ranked higher. The runs per wicket ratio is calculated as runs scored per wicket lost, divided by, runs conceded per wicket taken.[19]

2019[edit]

The Ashes (England v Australia)[edit]

1–5 August 2019
Scorecard
Australia 
284 (80.4 overs)
&
487/7d (112 overs)
v
 England
374 (135.5 overs)
&
146 (52.3 overs)
Australia won by 251 runs
Edgbaston, Birmingham
Points : Australia 24, England 0.
14–18 August 2019
Scorecard
England 
258 (77.1 overs)
&
258/5d (71 overs)
v
 Australia
250 (94.3 overs)
&
154/6 (47.3 overs)
Match drawn
Lord's, London
Points : Australia 8, England 8.
22–26 August 2019
Scorecard
Australia 
179 (52.1 overs)
&
246 (75.2 overs)
v
 England
67 (27.5 overs)
&
362/9 (125.4 overs)
England won by 1 wicket
Headingley, Leeds
Points : England 24, Australia 0.
4–8 September 2019
Scorecard
Australia 
497/8d (126 overs)
&
186/6d (42.5 overs)
v
 England
301 (107 overs)
&
197 (91.3 overs)
Australia won by 185 runs
Old Trafford, Manchester
Points : Australia 24, England 0.
12–16 September 2019
Scorecard
England 
294 (87.1 overs)
&
329 (95.3 overs)
v
 Australia
225 (68.5 overs)
&
263 (76.6 overs)
England won by 135 runs
The Kia Oval, London
Points : England 24, Australia 0.

Sri Lanka v New Zealand[edit]

14–18 August 2019
Scorecard
New Zealand 
249 (83.2 overs)
&
285 (106 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
267 (93.2 overs)
&
268/4 (86.1 overs)
Sri Lanka won by 6 wickets
Galle International Stadium, Galle
Points : Sri Lanka 60, New Zealand 0.
22–26 August 2019
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
244 (90.2 overs)
&
122 (70.2 overs)
v
 New Zealand
431/6d (115 overs)
New Zealand won by an innings and 65 runs
P. Sara Oval, Colombo
Points : New Zealand 60, Sri Lanka 0.

West Indies v India[edit]

22–26 August 2019
Scorecard
India 
297 (96.4 overs)
&
343/7d (112.3 overs)
v
 West Indies
222 (74.2 overs)
&
100 (26.5 overs)
30 August–3 September 2019
Scorecard
India 
416 (140.1 overs)
&
168/4d (54.4 overs)
v
 West Indies
117 (47.1 overs)
&
210 (59.5 overs)
India won by 257 runs
Sabina Park, Jamaica
Points : India 60, West Indies 0.

2019–20[edit]

Freedom Trophy (India v South Africa)[edit]

2–6 October 2019
Scorecard
India 
502/7d (136 overs)
&
323/4d (67 overs)
v
 South Africa
431 (131.2 overs)
&
191 (63.5 overs)
10–14 October 2019
Scorecard
India 
601/5d (156.3 overs)
v
 South Africa
275 (105.4 overs)
&
189 (67.2 overs) (f/o)
19–23 October 2019
Scorecard
India 
497/9d (116.3 overs)
v
 South Africa
162 (56.2 overs)
&
133 (48 overs) (f/o)

India v Bangladesh[edit]

14–18 November 2019
Scorecard
Bangladesh 
150 (58.3 overs)
&
213 (69.2 overs)
v
 India
493/6d (114 overs)
22–26 November 2019 (D/N)
Scorecard
Bangladesh 
106 (30.3 overs)
&
195 (41.1 overs)
v
 India
347/9d (89.4 overs)

Australia v Pakistan[edit]

21–25 November 2019
Scorecard
Pakistan 
240 (86.2 overs)
&
335 (84.2 overs)
v
 Australia
580 (157.4 overs)
29 November – 3 December 2019 (D/N)
Scorecard
Australia 
3/589d (127 overs)
v
 Pakistan
302 (94.4 overs)
&
239 (82 overs) (f/o)

Pakistan v Sri Lanka[edit]

11–15 December 2019
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
308/6d (97 overs)
v
 Pakistan
54/1 (19 overs)
19–23 December 2019
Scorecard
v

Trans-Tasman Trophy (Australia v New Zealand)[edit]

12–16 December 2019 (D/N)
Scorecard
Australia 
416 (146.2 overs)
&
9/217d (69.1 overs)
v
 New Zealand
166 (55.2 overs)
&
2/31 (12 overs)
26–30 December 2019
Scorecard
v
3–7 January 2020
Scorecard
v

Basil D'Oliveira Trophy (South Africa v England)[edit]

26–30 December 2019
Scorecard
v
3–7 January 2020
Scorecard
v
16–20 January 2020
Scorecard
v
24–28 January 2020
Scorecard
v

Pakistan v Bangladesh[edit]

January 2020
v

TBD
January 2020
v

TBD

New Zealand v India[edit]

21–25 February 2020
Scorecard
v
29 February–4 March 2020
Scorecard
v

Sri Lanka v England[edit]

19–23 March 2020
Scorecard
v
27–31 March 2020
Scorecard
v

2020[edit]

Bangladesh v Australia[edit]

June 2020
v

TBD
June 2020
v

TBD

Wisden Trophy (England v West Indies)[edit]

4–8 June 2020
Scorecard
v
12–16 June 2020
Scorecard
v
25–29 June 2020
Scorecard
v

England v Pakistan[edit]

30 July–3 August 2020
Scorecard
v
7–11 August 2020
Scorecard
v
20–24 August 2020
Scorecard
v

Sri Lanka v Bangladesh[edit]

July 2020
v

TBD
July 2020
v

TBD
July 2020
v

TBD

West Indies v South Africa[edit]

23–27 July 2020
Scorecard
v
31 July – 4 August 2020
Scorecard
v

Bangladesh v New Zealand[edit]

August 2020
v

TBD
August 2020
v

TBD

2020–21[edit]

New Zealand v West Indies[edit]

November 2020
v

TBD
November 2020
v

TBD

Border-Gavaskar Trophy (Australia v India)[edit]

November 2020
v

TBD
December 2020
v

TBD
December 2020
v

TBD
January 2021
v

TBD

New Zealand v Pakistan[edit]

December 2020
v

TBD
December 2020
v

TBD

Bangladesh v West Indies[edit]

January 2021
v

TBD
January 2021
v

TBD
January 2021
v

TBD

Pataudi Trophy (India v England)[edit]

January 2021
v

TBD
January 2021
v

TBD
January 2021
v

TBD
January 2021
v

TBD
January 2021
v

TBD

Pakistan v South Africa[edit]

January 2021
v

TBD
January 2021
v

TBD

South Africa v Sri Lanka[edit]

January 2021
v

TBD
January 2021
v

TBD

South Africa v Australia[edit]

February 2021
v

TBD
February 2021
v

TBD
February 2021
v

TBD

Sobers-Thissera Trophy (West Indies v Sri Lanka)[edit]

February 2021
v

TBD
February 2021
v

TBD

Final match[edit]

10–14 June 2021
TBD
v
TBD

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Test, ODI leagues approved by ICC Board". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 13 October 2017.
  2. ^ Staff, CricketCountry (16 July 2019). "World Test Championship: Adding context to Test cricket". Cricket Country. Retrieved 17 July 2019.
  3. ^ "How will the Test championship be played?". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 17 May 2018.
  4. ^ "Schedule for inaugural World Test Championship announced".
  5. ^ "Australia's new schedule features Afghanistan Test".
  6. ^ a b c d "FAQs - What happens if World Test Championship final ends in a draw or tie?". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 29 July 2019.
  7. ^ "ICC launches World Test Championship". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 29 July 2019.
  8. ^ Association, Press (13 October 2017). "ICC approves Test world championship and trial of four-day and matches". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 14 October 2017.
  9. ^ "World Test Championship points system values match wins over series triumphs".
  10. ^ "ICC outlines points plan for Test championship".
  11. ^ a b "ICC World Test Championship – FAQs". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 29 July 2019.
  12. ^ "ICC Approves Like-for-Like Concussion Substitutes For All International Cricket". News18. 19 July 2019. Retrieved 19 July 2019.
  13. ^ Ireland, Afghanistan and Zimbabwe, like the nine Championship participants will be able to add further fixtures outside the FTP including Test matches.
  14. ^ Netherlands have also been included on the FTP as a one-day and T20 playing nation only.
  15. ^ "Men's Future Tour Programme 2018-2023 released". International Cricket Council. 20 June 2018. Retrieved 20 June 2018.
  16. ^ "ICC Press Release". The sides will play six series in the two-year cycle on a home and away basis against opponents they have mutually selected
  17. ^ "World Test Championship is confusing, albeit well-meaning attempt to add context to bilateral cricket".
  18. ^ "Standings". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 18 August 2019.
  19. ^ "World Test Championship Playing Conditions: What's different?" (PDF). International Cricket Council. Retrieved 2 August 2019.