2019–21 ICC World Test Championship

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2019–21 ICC World Test Championship
2019–21 ICC World Test Championship Logo.jpg
ICC World Test Championship 2019–21 Logo
Dates1 August 2019 – 22 June 2021
Administrator(s)International Cricket Council
Cricket formatTest cricket
Tournament format(s)League and Final
Participants9
Official websiteOfficial website

The 2019–21 ICC World Test Championship is the inaugural edition of the ICC World Test Championship of Test cricket.[1] It started from 1 August 2019 with the first Test of the 2019 Ashes series,[2] and will finish with a final at Lord's in England in June 2021.[3]

It came nearly a decade after the International Cricket Council (ICC) first approved the idea for a World Test Championship in 2010, and following two cancelled attempts to hold the inaugural competition in 2013 and 2017.

It featured nine of the twelve Test playing nations,[4][5] each of whom did play a Test series against six of the other eight teams. Each series consisted of between two and five matches, so although all teams played six series (three at home and three away), they did not play the same number of Tests. Each team were able to score a maximum of 120 points from each series and the two teams with the most points at the end of the league stage would contest the final.[6] In the case of a draw or a tie in the final, the two teams playing the final would be declared joint champions.[6]

Some of the Test series in this Championship were part of a longer ongoing series, such as the 2019 Ashes series.[6] Also, some of these nine teams would play additional Test matches during this period which were not part of this Championship, as part of the ICC Future Tours Programme for 2018–23, mainly to give games to the three Test playing sides not taking part in this competition.[6] On 29 July 2019, the ICC officially launched the World Test Championship.[7]

The COVID-19 pandemic impacted on the Championship, with several rounds of matches being postponed or cancelled. In November 2020, the ICC announced that the finalists would be decided by percentage of points earned.[8][9]

On 2 February 2021, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Australia postponed their away series against South Africa, resulting in a guaranteed berth in the final for New Zealand.[10][11]

Format[edit]

The tournament is being played over two years. Each team play six other opponents, three at home and three away. Each series consists of between two and five Test matches. Therefore, all participants do not play the same number of Tests, but play the same number of series. At the end of the league stage the top two teams play in the final.[12] Each match is scheduled for a duration of five days. All players involved has a squad number, even if they have never made their debuts in ODI or T20I teams.

Point scoring[edit]

The ICC decided that the same number of points would be available from each series, regardless of series length, so that countries that played fewer Tests were not disadvantaged. It also decided that points would not be awarded for series results, but for match results only. These would be split equally between all the matches in the series, regardless of whether or not a match was a dead rubber,[13] so that every match counted.[14] In a five-match series, therefore, 20% of the points would be available each match, while in a two-match series, 50% of the points would be available each match.

Therefore, depending on whether the series is 2, 3, 4 or 5 matches long, the number of points awarded for a single match win would be a half, a third, a quarter, or a fifth of the maximum possible from the series. The ICC also decided that a tie should be worth half of a win and that a draw should be worth a third of a win.[15] This all meant that after each match, a side could be awarded a half, a third, a quarter, a fifth, a sixth, an eighth, a ninth, a tenth, a twelfth or a fifteenth of the total points available from the series, depending on the result and how many matches the series happened to consist of. Ultimately, this meant a figure for the total points available from the series needs to be picked very carefully, as not many numbers give all integers when split into all these different fractions (360 does). Being a highly composite number, when 120 was split into all these fractions, an integer was obtained in all cases except one - the points awarded for a draw in a 3-match series should be 13​13 (a third of a third of 120), but the ​13 had been dropped.

Each series would therefore carry a maximum of 120 points with points distributed as follows:

Distributions of points in ICC World Test Championship[16]
Matches in series Points for a win Points for a tie Points for a draw Points for a defeat
2 60 30 20 0
3 40 20 13 0
4 30 15 10 0
5 24 12 8 0

A team that was behind the required over rate at the end of a match would have two competition points deducted for each over it was behind.[17] In January 2020, South Africa became the first team to be docked World Test Championship points, after a slow over-rate in the fourth Test against England.[18]

Participants[edit]

The nine full members of the ICC who participated were:

Since each team played only six of the eight possible opponents, the ICC announced that India and Pakistan would not play against each other in the first and second editions of the tournament.

The three full members of the ICC who did not participate:

These were the three lowest ranked full members of the ICC. They had been included in the ICC Future Tours Programme; they played a number of Test matches during this period against Championship participants and each other[n 1] but these did not have bearing on the Championship.[n 2]

Schedule[edit]

The schedule for the World Test Championship was announced by the ICC on 20 June 2018, as part of the 2018–2023 Future Tours Programme.[19]

Home \ Away Australia Bangladesh England India New Zealand Pakistan South Africa Sri Lanka West Indies Cricket Board
Australia  1–2 [4] 3–0 [3] 2–0 [2]
Bangladesh  Cancelled [2] Cancelled [2] 0–2 [2]
England  2–2 [5] 1–0 [3] 2–1 [3]
India  2–0 [2] 2–1* [4] 3–0 [3]
New Zealand  2–0 [2] 2–0 [2] 2–0 [2]
Pakistan  1–0 [1/2] 2–0 [2] 1–0 [2]
South Africa  Cancelled [3] 1–3 [4] 2–0 [2]
Sri Lanka  2 matches
Apr 2021
0–2 [2] 1–1 [2]
West Indies  0–2 [2] Cancelled [2] 2 matches
Mar 2021
Updated to match(es) played on 16 February 2021. Source: icc-cricket The numbers in square brackets are the numbers of matches in the series.
Legend: Blue = home team win; Yellow = draw; Red = away team win.

Therefore, the total number of matches played by each team (home and away) in this tournament, and the two countries that each side did not face in this tournament, were as follows. (Note this was not the total Test matches played by each team during this period, as some countries did play further matches during this period which were not part of this Championship, as part of the ICC Future Tours Programme for 2018–23. Some of these may be against the opponents they did not play in this Championship.)

Team Matches Did not play against
Total Home Away
 Australia 19 9 10  Sri Lanka and  West Indies
 Bangladesh 12 6 6  England and  South Africa
 England 21 11 10  Bangladesh and  New Zealand
 India 17 9 8  Pakistan and  Sri Lanka
 New Zealand 13 6 7  England and  South Africa
 Pakistan 13 6 7  India and  West Indies
 South Africa 16 9 7  Bangladesh and  New Zealand
 Sri Lanka 12 6 6  Australia and  India
 West Indies 13 6 7  Australia and  Pakistan

Variations in strength of opponents[edit]

Rather than being a full round-robin tournament in which everyone played everyone else equally, each team played only six of the other eight. Each team played a different set of opponents, and so can be considered as having an easier or harder schedule.

All the series were mutually agreed between the two nations involved;[19] this had led to allegations that the schedule has been agreed based on what would provide the biggest television audiences, and therefore television receipts,[20] rather than selecting an even spread of teams.

COVID-19 pandemic[edit]

The COVID-19 pandemic impacted on international cricket fixtures, including matches in the Championship. In March 2020, the second Test match between Pakistan and Bangladesh was postponed due to the pandemic.[21] Later the same month, the two-match series between Sri Lanka and England was also postponed.[22] The following month saw Australia's tour to Bangladesh and the West Indies tour to England being postponed.[23][24] In June 2020, the two-match series between Bangladesh and New Zealand and the three-match series between Sri Lanka and Bangladesh were both postponed.[25][26] South Africa's tour of the West Indies was postponed, after the fixtures clashed with the West Indies rescheduled tour to England.[27][28]

On 29 July 2020, the ICC confirmed that their attention had moved to the fixtures in the World Test Championship, with their priority on rescheduling the six Test series that had been postponed.[29] The ICC ultimately accepted several series would not take place as part of the Championship and changed the points system to account for the variation in the number of series played per team.[8][9]

League stage[edit]

League table[edit]

Pos Team Series Matches PC PCT Ded Points RpW Ratio
P W L D P W L D T
1  India 6* 4 1 0 16 11 4 1 0 690 71.0% 0 490 1.549
2  New Zealand 5 3 1 1 11 7 4 0 0 600 70.0% 0 420 1.281
3  Australia 4 2 1 1 14 8 4 2 0 480 69.2% 4[a] 332 1.392
4  England 6* 4 0 1 20 11 6 3 0 690 64.1% 0 442 1.163
5  Pakistan 5.5 3 3 0 12 4 5 3 0 660 43.3% 0 286 0.822
6  West Indies 4 1 3 0 9 3 6 0 0 480 33.3% 0 160 0.598
7  South Africa 4 1 3 0 11 3 8 0 0 480 30.0% 6[b] 144 0.693
8  Sri Lanka 4 0 3 1 8 1 6 1 0 480 16.7% 0 80 0.586
9  Bangladesh 2.5 0 3 0 5 0 5 0 0 300 0.0% 0 0 0.577
Last updated: 25 February 2021. Source: International Cricket Council,[31] ESPNcricinfo[32]
  1. ^ Australia were deducted 4 points for a slow over rate in the second Test against India on 29 December 2020.[30]
  2. ^ South Africa were deducted 6 points for a slow over rate in the fourth Test against England on 27 January 2020.[18]
  • The top two teams advance to the final.
  • Teams are ranked by PCT. If two teams are tied on PCT, then they are ranked by runs per wicket ratio. If teams are still tied, ranking is determined by matches won in series between the teams, finally by ranking in the Men's Test Team Rankings as at 30 April 2021.[33]
  • Under the original rules, teams were ranked first by points. If two teams were tied on points, the team that won more series was ranked higher. If teams were still equal, the runs per wicket ratio was used.[34] This ranking system was amended in November 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic causing some series to be cancelled, meaning not all teams would compete for the same number of points.[9]
  • *indicates ongoing series
  •   Team eliminated from final
  •   Team qualified for final

2019[edit]

The Ashes (England v Australia)[edit]

1–5 August 2019
Scorecard
Australia 
284 (80.4 overs)
&
487/7d (112 overs)
v
 England
374 (135.5 overs)
&
146 (52.3 overs)
Australia won by 251 runs
Edgbaston, Birmingham
Points: Australia 24, England 0
14–18 August 2019
Scorecard
England 
258 (77.1 overs)
&
258/5d (71 overs)
v
 Australia
250 (94.3 overs)
&
154/6 (47.3 overs)
Match drawn
Lord's, London
Points: Australia 8, England 8
22–26 August 2019
Scorecard
Australia 
179 (52.1 overs)
&
246 (75.2 overs)
v
 England
67 (27.5 overs)
&
362/9 (125.4 overs)
England won by 1 wicket
Headingley, Leeds
Points: England 24, Australia 0
4–8 September 2019
Scorecard
Australia 
497/8d (126 overs)
&
186/6d (42.5 overs)
v
 England
301 (107 overs)
&
197 (91.3 overs)
Australia won by 185 runs
Old Trafford, Manchester
Points: Australia 24, England 0
12–16 September 2019
Scorecard
England 
294 (87.1 overs)
&
329 (95.3 overs)
v
 Australia
225 (68.5 overs)
&
263 (76.6 overs)
England won by 135 runs
The Kia Oval, London
Points: England 24, Australia 0

Sri Lanka v New Zealand[edit]

14–18 August 2019
Scorecard
New Zealand 
249 (83.2 overs)
&
285 (106 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
267 (93.2 overs)
&
268/4 (86.1 overs)
22–26 August 2019
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
244 (90.2 overs)
&
122 (70.2 overs)
v
 New Zealand
431/6d (115 overs)

West Indies v India[edit]

22–26 August 2019
Scorecard
India 
297 (96.4 overs)
&
343/7d (112.3 overs)
v
 West Indies
222 (74.2 overs)
&
100 (26.5 overs)
30 August–3 September 2019
Scorecard
India 
416 (140.1 overs)
&
168/4d (54.4 overs)
v
 West Indies
117 (47.1 overs)
&
210 (59.5 overs)
India won by 257 runs
Sabina Park, Jamaica
Points: India 60, West Indies 0

2019–20[edit]

Freedom Trophy (India v South Africa)[edit]

2–6 October 2019
Scorecard
India 
502/7d (136 overs)
&
323/4d (67 overs)
v
 South Africa
431 (131.2 overs)
&
191 (63.5 overs)
10–14 October 2019
Scorecard
India 
601/5d (156.3 overs)
v
 South Africa
275 (105.4 overs)
&
189 (67.2 overs) (f/o)
19–23 October 2019
Scorecard
India 
497/9d (116.3 overs)
v
 South Africa
162 (56.2 overs)
&
133 (48 overs) (f/o)

Ganguly–Durjoy Trophy (India v Bangladesh)[edit]

14–18 November 2019
Scorecard
Bangladesh 
150 (58.3 overs)
&
213 (69.2 overs)
v
 India
493/6d (114 overs)
22–26 November 2019 (D/N)
Scorecard
Bangladesh 
106 (30.3 overs)
&
195 (41.1 overs)
v
 India
347/9d (89.4 overs)

Australia v Pakistan[edit]

21–25 November 2019
Scorecard
Pakistan 
240 (86.2 overs)
&
335 (84.2 overs)
v
 Australia
580 (157.4 overs)
29 November – 3 December 2019 (D/N)
Scorecard
Australia 
3/589d (127 overs)
v
 Pakistan
302 (94.4 overs)
&
239 (82 overs) (f/o)

Pakistan v Sri Lanka[edit]

11–15 December 2019
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
308/6d (97 overs)
v
 Pakistan
252/2 (70 overs)
Match drawn
Rawalpindi Cricket Stadium, Rawalpindi
Points: Pakistan 20, Sri Lanka 20
19–23 December 2019
Scorecard
Pakistan 
191 (59.3 overs)
&
555/3d (131 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
271 (85.5 overs)
&
212 (62.5 overs)
Pakistan won by 263 runs
National Stadium, Karachi
Points: Pakistan 60, Sri Lanka 0

Trans-Tasman Trophy (Australia v New Zealand)[edit]

12–16 December 2019 (D/N)
Scorecard
Australia 
416 (146.2 overs)
&
9/217d (69.1 overs)
v
 New Zealand
166 (55.2 overs)
&
171 (65.3 overs)
Australia won by 296 runs
Perth Stadium, Perth
Points: Australia 40, New Zealand 0
26–30 December 2019
Scorecard
Australia 
467 (155.1 overs)
&
5/168d (54.2 overs)
v
 New Zealand
148 (54.5 overs)
&
240 (71 overs)
3–7 January 2020
Scorecard
Australia 
454 (150.1 overs)
&
2/217d (52 overs)
v
 New Zealand
256 (95.4 overs)
&
136 (47.5 overs)
Australia won by 279 runs
Sydney Cricket Ground, Sydney
Points: Australia 40, New Zealand 0

Basil D'Oliveira Trophy (South Africa v England)[edit]

26–30 December 2019
Scorecard
South Africa 
284 (84.3 overs)
&
272 (61.4 overs)
v
 England
181 (53.2 overs)
&
268 (93 overs)
South Africa won by 107 runs
Centurion Park, Centurion
Points: South Africa 30, England 0
3–7 January 2020
Scorecard
England 
269 (91.5 overs)
&
391/8d (111 overs)
v
 South Africa
223 (89 overs)
&
248 (137.4 overs)
England won by 189 runs
PPC Newlands, Cape Town
Points: England 30, South Africa 0
16–20 January 2020
Scorecard
England 
499/9d (152 overs)
v
 South Africa
209 (86.4 overs)
&
237 (88.5 overs)(f/o)
24–28 January 2020
Scorecard
England 
400 (98.2 overs)
&
248 (61.3 overs)
v
 South Africa
183 (68.3 overs)
&
274 (77.1 overs)
England won by 191 runs
Wanderers Stadium, Johannesburg
Points: England 30, South Africa –6[18]

Pakistan v Bangladesh[edit]

The second match was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[21] Due to a busy schedule, the match would be postponed until the 2021–22 season and outside the Championship season.[35]

7–11 February 2020
Scorecard
Bangladesh 
233 (82.5 overs)
&
168 (62.2 overs)
v
 Pakistan
445 (122.5 overs)
5–9 April 2020
Scorecard
v

New Zealand v India[edit]

21–25 February 2020
Scorecard
India 
165 (68.1 overs)
&
191 (81 overs)
v
 New Zealand
348 (100.2 overs)
&
9/0 (1.4 overs)
29 February–4 March 2020
Scorecard
India 
242 (63 overs)
&
124 (46 overs)
v
 New Zealand
235 (73.1 overs)
&
132/3 (36 overs)

2020[edit]

Bangladesh v Australia[edit]

This series did not happen due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

11–15 June 2020
Scorecard
v
19–23 June 2020
Scorecard
v

Wisden Trophy (England v West Indies)[edit]

This series was originally scheduled for May and June 2020 but was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[36]

8–12 July 2020
Scorecard
England 
204 (67.3 overs)
&
313 (111.2 overs)
v
 West Indies
318 (102 overs)
&
200/6 (64.2 overs)
West Indies won by 4 wickets
Rose Bowl, Southampton
Points: West Indies 40, England 0
16–20 July 2020
Scorecard
England 
469/9d (162 overs)
&
129/3d (19 overs)
v
 West Indies
287 (99 overs)
&
198 (70.1 overs)
England won by 113 runs
Old Trafford, Manchester
Points: England 40, West Indies 0
24–28 July 2020
Scorecard
England 
369 (111.5 overs)
&
226/2d (58 overs)
v
 West Indies
197 (65 overs)
&
129 (37.1 overs)
England won by 269 runs
Old Trafford, Manchester
Points: England 40, West Indies 0

West Indies v South Africa[edit]

This series did not happen due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

23–27 July 2020
Scorecard
v
31 July – 4 August 2020
Scorecard
v

England v Pakistan[edit]

5–9 August 2020
Scorecard
Pakistan 
326 (109.3 overs)
&
169 (46.4 overs)
v
 England
219 (70.3 overs)
&
277/7 (82.1 overs)
England won by 3 wickets
Old Trafford, Manchester
Points: England 40, Pakistan 0
13–17 August 2020
Scorecard
Pakistan 
236 (91.2 overs)
v
 England
110/4d (43.1 overs)
Match drawn
Rose Bowl, Southampton
Points: England 13, Pakistan 13
21–25 August 2020
Scorecard
England 
583/8d (154.4 overs)
v
 Pakistan
273 (93 overs)
&
187/4 (83.1 overs) (f/o)
Match drawn
Rose Bowl, Southampton
Points: England 13, Pakistan 13

Bangladesh v New Zealand[edit]

This series did not happen due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

August 2020
v
Cancelled
August 2020
v
Cancelled

2020–21[edit]

New Zealand v West Indies[edit]

3–7 December 2020
Scorecard
New Zealand 
519/7d (145 overs)
v
 West Indies
138 (64 overs)
&
247 (58.5 overs) (f/o)
11–15 December 2020
Scorecard
New Zealand 
460 (114 overs)
v
 West Indies
131 (56.4 overs)
&
317 (79.1 overs) (f/o)

Border–Gavaskar Trophy (Australia v India)[edit]

17–21 December 2020 (D/N)
Scorecard
India 
244 (93.1 overs)
&
36 (21.2 overs)
v
 Australia
191 (72.1 overs)
&
2/93 (21 overs)
26–30 December 2020
Scorecard
Australia 
195 (72.3 overs)
&
200 (103.1 overs)
v
 India
326 (115.1 overs)
&
2/70 (15.5 overs)
7–11 January 2021
Scorecard
Australia 
338 (105.4 overs)
&
6/312d (87 overs)
v
 India
244 (100.4 overs)
&
5/334 (131 overs)
Match drawn
Sydney Cricket Ground, Sydney
Points: Australia 10, India 10
15–19 January 2021
Scorecard
Australia 
369 (115.2 overs)
&
294 (75.5 overs)
v
 India
336 (111.4 overs)
&
7/329 (97 overs)
India won by 3 wickets
The Gabba, Brisbane
Points: India 30, Australia 0

New Zealand v Pakistan[edit]

26–30 December 2020
Scorecard
New Zealand 
431 (155 overs)
&
180/5d (45.3 overs)
v
 Pakistan
239 (102.2 overs)
&
271 (123.3 overs)
New Zealand won by 101 runs
Bay Oval, Mount Maunganui
Points: New Zealand 60, Pakistan 0
3–7 January 2021
Scorecard
Pakistan 
297 (83.5 overs)
&
186 (81.4 overs)
v
 New Zealand
659/6d (158.5 overs)

South Africa v Sri Lanka[edit]

26–30 December 2020
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
396 (96 overs)
&
180 (46.1 overs)
v
 South Africa
621 (142.1 overs)
3–7 January 2021
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
157 (40.3 overs)
&
211 (56.5 overs)
v
 South Africa
302 (75.4 overs)
&
67/0 (13.2 overs)

Sri Lanka v England[edit]

This series was originally scheduled for March 2020 but was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[37]

14–18 January 2021
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
135 (46.1 overs)
&
359 (136.5 overs)
v
 England
421 (117.1 overs)
&
76/3 (24.2 overs)
22–26 January 2021
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
381 (139.3 overs)
&
126 (35.5 overs)
v
 England
344 (116.1 overs)
&
164/4 (43.3 overs)

Pakistan v South Africa[edit]

26–30 January 2021
Scorecard
South Africa 
220 (69.2 overs)
&
245 (100.3 overs)
v
 Pakistan
378 (119.2 overs)
&
90/3 (22.5 overs)
Pakistan won by 7 wickets
National Stadium, Karachi
Points: Pakistan 60, South Africa 0
4–8 February 2021
Scorecard
Pakistan 
272 (114.3 overs)
&
298 (102 overs)
v
 South Africa
201 (65.4 overs)
&
274 (91.4 overs)

Bangladesh v West Indies[edit]

This was originally a three-match series scheduled for January 2021.

3–7 February 2021
Scorecard
Bangladesh 
430 (150.2 overs)
&
223/8d (67.5 overs)
v
 West Indies
259 (96.1 overs)
&
395/7 (127.3 overs)
11–15 February 2021
Scorecard
West Indies 
409 (142.2 overs)
&
117 (52.5 overs)
v
 Bangladesh
296 (96.5 overs)
&
213 (61.3 overs)

Anthony de Mello Trophy (India v England)[edit]

This was originally a five-match series.[38]

5–9 February 2021
Scorecard
England 
578 (190.1 overs)
&
178 (46.3 overs)
v
 India
337 (95.5 overs)
&
192 (58.1 overs)
13–17 February 2021
Scorecard
India 
329 (95.5 overs)
&
286 (85.5 overs)
v
 England
134 (59.5 overs)
&
164 (54.2 overs)
24–28 February 2021 (D/N)
Scorecard
England 
112 (48.4 overs)
&
81 (30.4 overs)
v
 India
145 (53.2 overs)
&
49/0 (7.4 overs)
4–8 March 2021
Scorecard
v

South Africa v Australia[edit]

This series did not take place as originally scheduled due to the COVID-19 pandemic and could not be a part of the Championship season.[39]

March 2021
v
Cancelled
March 2021
v
Cancelled
March 2021
v
Cancelled

Sobers–Tissera Trophy (West Indies v Sri Lanka)[edit]

21–25 March 2021
Scorecard
v
29 March – 2 April 2021
Scorecard
v

Sri Lanka v Bangladesh[edit]

This series originally comprised three Test matches and was scheduled for July–August 2020, then postponed to October 2020, but was rescheduled again due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In December 2020, the Bangladesh Cricket Board was considering touring Sri Lanka in April 2021 to play two Test matches.

April 2021
v

TBD
April 2021
v

TBD

Final match[edit]

18–22 June 2021
Scorecard
v
TBD

Statistics[edit]

Individual statistics[edit]

The top 5 players in each category are listed.

Most runs[edit]

Batsman Mat Inns NO Runs Ave HS 100s 50s
Australia Marnus Labuschagne 13 23 0 1675 72.82 215 5 9
England Joe Root 19 35 2 1625 49.24 228 3 8
Australia Steve Smith 13 22 1 1341 63.85 211 4 7
England Ben Stokes 16 30 3 1277 47.30 176 4 5
India Ajinkya Rahane 15* 27 3 1068 44.50 115 3 6
[*=playing] Last Update: 25 February 2021[40]

Most wickets[edit]

Bowler Mat Inns Wkts Runs Overs BBI BBM Avg 5WI 10WM
Australia Pat Cummins 14 28 70 1472 555.3 5/28 7/69 21.02 1 0
England Stuart Broad 16 31 69 1386 499.3 6/31 10/67 20.08 2 1
India R Ashwin 12 22 59 1305 482.0 7/145 9/207 22.11 3 0
Australia Nathan Lyon 14 27 56 1757 630.5 6/49 10/118 31.37 4 1
New Zealand Tim Southee 10 20 51 1054 390.3 5/32 9/110 20.66 3 0
Last Update: 25 February 2021[41]

Highest individual score[edit]

Batsman Runs Balls 4s 6s Opposition Ground Match date
Australia David Warner 335* 418 39 1 Pakistan Pakistan Adelaide 29 November 2019
England Zak Crawley 267 393 34 1 Pakistan Pakistan Southampton 21 August 2020
India Virat Kohli 254* 336 33 2 South Africa South Africa Pune 10 October 2019
New Zealand Kane Williamson 251 412 34 2 West Indies Cricket Board West Indies Hamilton 3 December 2020
India Mayank Agarwal 243 330 28 8 Bangladesh Bangladesh Indore 14 November 2019
Last Update: 6 December 2020[42]

Best bowling figures in an innings[edit]

Bowler Wkts Runs Overs Mdns Econ Opposition Ground Match date
Sri Lanka Lasith Embuldeniya 7 137 42 6 3.26 England England Galle 25 January 2021
India Ravichandran Ashwin 7 145 46.2 11 3.12 South Africa South Africa Visakhapatnam 2 October 2019
India Jasprit Bumrah 6 27 12.1 3 2.21 West Indies Cricket Board West Indies Sabina Park 30 August 2019
England Stuart Broad 6 31 14.0 4 2.21 West Indies Cricket Board West Indies Old Trafford 24 July 2020
India Axar Patel 6 38 21.4 6 1.8 England England Ahmedabad 24 February 2021
Last Update: 24 February 2021[43]

Best bowling figures in a match[edit]

Bowler Wkts Runs Overs Mdns Opposition Ground Match date
India Axar Patel 11 70 36.4 9 England England Ahmedabad 25 February 2021
New Zealand Kyle Jamieson 11 117 41 14 Pakistan Pakistan Christchurch 3 January 2021
England Stuart Broad 10 67 22.1 5 West Indies Cricket Board West Indies Old Trafford 24 July 2020
Pakistan Hasan Ali 10 114 31.4 4 South Africa South Africa Rawalpindi 4 February 2021
Australia Nathan Lyon 10 118 47.3 14 New Zealand New Zealand Sydney 3 January 2020
Last Update: 25 February 2021[44]

Best batting averages[edit]

Players with a minimum of 500 runs scored listed.[clarification needed]

Batsman Matches Runs Average HS 100s 50s
Australia Marnus Labuschagne 13 1675 72.82 215 5 9
Pakistan Babar Azam 10 932 66.57 143 4 5
India Rohit Sharma 10 981 65.40 212 4 2
Australia Steve Smith 13 1341 63.85 211 4 6
New Zealand Kane Williamson 9 817 58.35 251 3 1
[*=playing] Last Update: 25 February 2021[45]

Best bowling averages[edit]

A minimum of 20 wickets is required to be listed.[clarification needed]

Bowler Matches Wkts Average BBI BBM
New Zealand Kyle Jamieson 6 36 13.27 6/48 11/117
India Ishant Sharma 10 36 16.72 5/22 9/78
India Umesh Yadav 7 29 18.55 5/53 8/82
England James Anderson 10 36 19.91 6/31 10/67
India Mohammed Shami 10 36 19.77 5/35 7/58
Last Update: 25 February 2021[46]

Team statistics[edit]

The top 5 countries in each category are listed

Highest team totals[edit]

Team Score Overs RR Inns Opposition Venue Date
 New Zealand 659/6d 158.5 4.14 2  Pakistan Christchurch 3 January 2021
 South Africa 621 142.1 4.36 2  Sri Lanka Centurion 26 December 2020
 India 601/5d 156.3 3.84 1  South Africa Pune 10 October 2019
 Australia 589/3d 127.0 4.63 1  Pakistan Adelaide 29 November 2019
 England 583/8d 154.4 3.76 1  Pakistan Southampton 21 August 2020
(d=declared) Last Update: 5 January 2021[47]

Lowest team totals[edit]

Only all-out totals are listed. (No Declaration)

Team Score Overs RR Inns Opposition Venue Date
 India 36 21.2 1.68 3  Australia Adelaide 17 December 2020
 England 67 27.5 2.40 2  Australia Headingley 22 August 2019
 England 81 30.4 2.64 3  India Ahmedabad 25 February 2021
 West Indies 100 26.5 3.72 4  India North Sound 22 August 2019
 Bangladesh 106 30.3 3.47 1  India Kolkata 22 November 2019
Last Update: 25 February 2021[48]

Highest successful run-chases[edit]

Team Score Target Overs RR Opposition Venue Date
 West Indies 395/7 395 127.3 3.10  Bangladesh Chattogram 7 February 2021
 England 362/9 359 125.4 2.88  Australia Headingley 25 August 2019
 India 329/7 328 97.0 3.39  Australia The Gabba 19 January 2021
 England 277/7 277 82.1 3.37  Pakistan Old Trafford 8 August 2020
 Sri Lanka 268/4 268 86.1 3.11  New Zealand Galle 18 August 2019
Last Update: 7 February 2021[49]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Ireland, Afghanistan and Zimbabwe, like the nine Championship participants were not able to add further fixtures outside the FTP including Test matches.
  2. ^ Netherlands were also included on the FTP as a one-day and T20 playing nation only.

References[edit]

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  35. ^ Yousaf, Muhammad (29 September 2020). "Solitary Pakistan, Bangladesh Test unlikely to take place before 2021". Cricket Pakistan. Retrieved 10 February 2021.
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  48. ^ "Lowest Team Totals". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 25 January 2021.
  49. ^ "Highest Successful Run chases". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 7 February 2021.

External links[edit]