2019 College Football All-America Team

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The 2019 College Football All-America Team includes those players of American college football who have been honored by various selector organizations as the best players at their respective positions. The selector organizations award the "All-America" honor annually following the conclusion of the fall college football season. The original All-America team was the 1889 College Football All-America Team selected by Caspar Whitney and Walter Camp.[1][2][3] The National Collegiate Athletic Bureau, which is the National Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA) service bureau, compiled, in the 1950, the first list of All-Americans including first-team selections on teams created for a national audience that received national circulation with the intent of recognizing selections made from viewpoints that were nationwide.[4] Since 1957, College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) has bestowed Academic All-American recognition on male and female athletes in Divisions I, II, and III of the NCAA as well as National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics athletes, including all NCAA championship sports.

The 2019 College Football All-America Team is composed of the following College Football All-American first teams chosen by the following selector organizations: Associated Press (AP), Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), Walter Camp Foundation (WCFF), Sporting News (TSN, from its historic name of The Sporting News), Sports Illustrated (SI), The Athletic (Athletic), USA Today (USAT) ESPN, CBS Sports (CBS), College Football News (CFN), Scout.com, Athlon Sports, and Fox Sports (FOX).

Currently, the NCAA compiles consensus all-America teams in the sports of Division I FBS football and Division I men's basketball using a point system computed from All-America teams named by coaches associations or media sources. Players are chosen against other players playing at their position only. To be selected a consensus All-American, players must be chosen to the first team on at least two of the five official selectors as recognized by the NCAA. Second- and third-team honors are used to break ties. Players named first-team by all five selectors are deemed unanimous All-Americans. Currently, the NCAA recognizes All-Americans selected by the AP, AFCA, FWAA, TSN, and the WCFF to determine consensus and unanimous All-Americans.[5]

Twenty-five players were recognized as consensus All-Americans for 2019, 16 of them unanimously. Unanimous selections are followed by an asterisk (*)

2019 Consensus All-Americans
Name Position Year University
Joe Burrow* Quarterback Senior LSU
Chuba Hubbard* Running back Sophomore Oklahoma State
Jonathan Taylor* Junior Wisconsin
Ja'Marr Chase* Wide receiver Sophomore LSU
CeeDee Lamb Junior Oklahoma
Harrison Bryant* Tight end Senior FAU
Tyler Biadasz* Center Junior Wisconsin
Wyatt Davis Offensive line Sophomore Ohio State
John Simpson Senior Clemson
Penei Sewell* Sophomore Oregon
Andrew Thomas* Junior Georgia
Bradlee Anae Defensive line Senior Utah
Derrick Brown* Senior Auburn
James Lynch* Junior Baylor
Chase Young* Junior Ohio State
Isaiah Simmons* Linebacker Junior Clemson
Evan Weaver* Senior California
Grant Delpit Defensive back Junior LSU
Jeff Okudah* Junior Ohio State
J. R. Reed Senior Georgia
Derek Stingley Jr. Freshman LSU
Antoine Winfield Jr.* Sophomore Minnesota
Max Duffy* Punter Junior Kentucky
Lynn Bowden Jr. All-purpose Junior Kentucky
Keith Duncan Placekicker Junior Iowa

Offense[edit]

Quarterback[edit]

  • Joe Burrow, LSU (AFCA, AP, Athletic, Athlon, CBS, ESPN, FWAA, Phil Steele, SI, TSN, USAT, WCFF)

Running back[edit]

Wide receiver[edit]

Tight end[edit]

Offensive line[edit]

Defense[edit]

Defensive line[edit]

Linebacker[edit]

Defensive back[edit]

Special teams[edit]

Kicker[edit]

Punter[edit]

All-purpose / return specialist[edit]

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ The Michigan alumnus. University of Michigan Library. 2010. p. 495. ASIN B0037HO8MY.
  2. ^ Martin, John Stuart (October 1961). "Walter Camp and His Gridiron Game". American Heritage. 12 (6). Archived from the original on July 23, 2008. Retrieved October 17, 2011.
  3. ^ Newsome, Ron. "Amos Alonzo Stagg: Just Who Was This Guy, Anyway?". CBS Interactive/NCAA.org. Retrieved October 17, 2011.[dead link]
  4. ^ "Football Award Winners". NCAA. Archived from the original on July 14, 2009. Retrieved October 17, 2011.
  5. ^ "2010-11 NCAA Statistics Policies(updated 9/15/2010)". National Collegiate Athletic Association. September 15, 2010. Archived from the original on December 10, 2011. Retrieved December 10, 2011.

References[edit]