2019 Critérium du Dauphiné

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

2019 Critérium du Dauphiné
2019 UCI World Tour, race 25 of 38
Race details
Dates9–16 June 2019
Stages8
Distance1,195.6[1] km (742.9 mi)
Winning time30h 44' 27"
Results
Winner  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) (Astana)
  Second  Tejay van Garderen (USA) (EF Education First)
  Third  Emanuel Buchmann (GER) (Bora–Hansgrohe)

Points  Wout Van Aert (BEL) (Team Jumbo–Visma)
Mountains  Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) (Deceuninck–Quick-Step)
Youth  Bjorg Lambrecht (BEL) (Lotto–Soudal)
  Team Astana
← 2018

The 2019 Critérium du Dauphiné was the 71st edition of the Critérium du Dauphiné, a road cycling stage race. The race took place between 9 and 16 June 2019, in France and Switzerland.[2] On 25 March 2019, the race organisers, the Amaury Sport Organisation (ASO), announced the route at a presentation in Lyon.[3]

Teams[edit]

The eighteen UCI WorldTeams were automatically invited to participate. In addition, four UCI Professional Continental teams received wildcard invitations: Cofidis, Arkéa–Samsic, Vital Concept–B&B Hotels and Wanty–Groupe Gobert.[3] In total, twenty-two teams started the race, with seven riders per team:[4]

UCI WorldTeams

UCI Professional Continental teams

Pre-race favourites[edit]

Chris Froome (Team Ineos) was the favourite for the race, having won three previous editions. Defending champion Geraint Thomas (Team Ineos) was not in the field. Jakob Fuglsang (Astana), Richie Porte (Trek–Segafredo), Nairo Quintana (Movistar Team) and Tom Dumoulin (Team Sunweb) were considered as the nearest rivals.[5]

Route[edit]

Stage characteristics and winners[1][2][6]
Stage Date Course Distance Type Winner
1 9 June Aurillac to Jussac 142 km (88.2 mi) Medium mountain stage  Edvald Boasson Hagen (NOR)
2 10 June Mauriac to Craponne-sur-Arzon 180 km (111.8 mi) Hilly stage  Dylan Teuns (BEL)
3 11 June Le Puy-en-Velay to Riom 172 km (106.9 mi) Hilly stage  Sam Bennett (IRL)
4 12 June Roanne to Roanne 26.1 km (16.2 mi) Individual time trial  Wout Van Aert (BEL)
5 13 June Boën-sur-Lignon to Voiron 201 km (124.9 mi) Hilly stage  Wout Van Aert (BEL)
6 14 June Saint-Vulbas to Saint-Michel-de-Maurienne 228 km (141.7 mi) Medium mountain stage  Julian Alaphilippe (FRA)
7 15 June Saint-Genix-les-Villages to Les Sept Laux-Pipay 133 km (82.6 mi) Mountain stage  Wout Poels (NED)
8 16 June Cluses to Champéry (Switzerland) 113.5 km (70.5 mi) Medium mountain stage  Dylan Van Baarle (NED)
Total 1,195.6 km (743 mi)

Stages[edit]

Stage 1[edit]

9 June 2019 - Aurillac to Jussac, 142 km (88.2 mi)[2]

Stage 1 result[7][8]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Edvald Boasson Hagen (NOR) Team Dimension Data 3h 24' 33"
2  Philippe Gilbert (BEL) Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 0"
3  Wout Van Aert (BEL) Team Jumbo–Visma + 0"
4  Nils Politt (GER) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 0"
5  Gregor Mühlberger (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe + 0"
6  Sonny Colbrelli (ITA) Bahrain–Merida + 0"
7  Jonas Koch (GER) CCC Team + 0"
8  Alexey Lutsenko (KAZ) Astana + 0"
9  Benoît Cosnefroy (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 0"
10  Michał Kwiatkowski (POL) Team Ineos + 0"
General classification after stage 1[7][8]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Edvald Boasson Hagen (NOR) General classificationPoints classification Team Dimension Data 3h 24' 23"
2  Philippe Gilbert (BEL) Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 4"
3  Wout Van Aert (BEL) Youth classification Team Jumbo–Visma + 6"
4  Nils Politt (GER) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 10"
5  Gregor Mühlberger (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe + 10"
6  Sonny Colbrelli (ITA) Bahrain–Merida + 10"
7  Jonas Koch (GER) CCC Team + 10"
8  Alexey Lutsenko (KAZ) Astana + 10"
9  Benoît Cosnefroy (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 10"
10  Michał Kwiatkowski (POL) Team Ineos + 10"

Stage 2[edit]

10 June 2019 - Mauriac to Craponne-sur-Arzon, 180 km (111.8 mi)[2]

Stage 2 result[9][10]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Dylan Teuns (BEL) Bahrain–Merida 4h 12' 41"
2  Guillaume Martin (FRA) Wanty–Groupe Gobert + 0"
3  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 13"
4  Thibaut Pinot (FRA) Groupama–FDJ + 13"
5  Michael Woods (CAN) EF Education First + 13"
6  Alexey Lutsenko (KAZ) Astana + 13"
7  Petr Vakoč (CZE) Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 13"
8  Nairo Quintana (COL) Movistar Team + 13"
9  Wout Poels (NED) Team Ineos + 13"
10  Adam Yates (GBR) Mitchelton–Scott + 13"
General classification after stage 2[9][10]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Dylan Teuns (BEL) General classification Bahrain–Merida 7h 37' 03"
2  Guillaume Martin (FRA) Wanty–Groupe Gobert + 3"
3  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 20"
4  Alexey Lutsenko (KAZ) Points classification Astana + 21"
5  Nairo Quintana (COL) Movistar Team + 24"
6  Michael Woods (CAN) EF Education First + 24"
7  Wout Poels (NED) Team Ineos + 24"
8  Chris Froome (GBR) Team Ineos + 24"
9  Thibaut Pinot (FRA) Groupama–FDJ + 24"
10  Adam Yates (GBR) Mitchelton–Scott + 24"

Stage 3[edit]

11 June 2019 - Le Puy-en-Velay to Riom, 172 km (106.9 mi)[2]

Stage 3 result[11][12]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Sam Bennett (IRL) Bora–Hansgrohe 4h 15' 25"
2  Wout Van Aert (BEL) Youth classification Team Jumbo–Visma + 0"
3  Davide Ballerini (ITA) Astana + 0"
4  Clément Venturini (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 0"
5  Edward Theuns (BEL) Trek–Segafredo + 0"
6  Edvald Boasson Hagen (NOR) Team Dimension Data + 0"
7  Álvaro Hodeg (COL) Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 0"
8  Jens Debusschere (BEL) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 0"
9  Luka Mezgec (SLO) Mitchelton–Scott + 0"
10  Bjorg Lambrecht (BEL) Lotto–Soudal + 0"
General classification after stage 3[11][12]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Dylan Teuns (BEL) General classification Bahrain–Merida 11h 52' 28"
2  Guillaume Martin (FRA) Wanty–Groupe Gobert + 3"
3  Alexey Lutsenko (KAZ) Astana + 20"
4  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 20"
5  Nairo Quintana (COL) Movistar Team + 24"
6  Thibaut Pinot (FRA) Groupama–FDJ + 24"
7  Michael Woods (CAN) EF Education First + 24"
8  Chris Froome (GBR) Team Ineos + 24"
9  Wout Poels (NED) Team Ineos + 24"
10  Adam Yates (GBR) Mitchelton–Scott + 24"

Stage 4[edit]

12 June 2019 - Roanne to Roanne, 26.1 km (16.2 mi) (ITT)[2]

Pre-race favourite Chris Froome suffered a crash during the route reconnaissance before the stage, resulting in fractures of the pelvis, femur, elbow and ribs.[13][14] Team principal Dave Brailsford later confirmed that Froome would miss the rest of the race, and the 2019 Tour de France.[15]

Stage 4 result[16][17]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Wout Van Aert (BEL) Points classificationYouth classification Team Jumbo–Visma 33' 38"
2  Tejay van Garderen (USA) EF Education First + 31"
3  Tom Dumoulin (NED) Team Sunweb + 47"
4  Steven Kruijswijk (NED) Team Jumbo–Visma + 49"
5  Emanuel Buchmann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe + 51"
6  Adam Yates (GBR) Mitchelton–Scott + 56"
7  Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 59"
8  Nils Politt (GER) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 1' 05"
9  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 1' 07"
10  Rémi Cavagna (FRA) Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 1' 10"
General classification after stage 4[16][17]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Adam Yates (GBR) General classification Mitchelton–Scott 12h 27' 26"
2  Dylan Teuns (BEL) Bahrain–Merida + 4"
3  Tejay van Garderen (USA) EF Education First + 6"
4  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 7"
5  Steven Kruijswijk (NED) Team Jumbo–Visma + 24"
6  Thibaut Pinot (FRA) Groupama–FDJ + 25"
7  Emanuel Buchmann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe + 26"
8  Alexey Lutsenko (KAZ) Astana + 30"
9  Wout Van Aert (BEL) Points classificationYouth classification Team Jumbo–Visma + 30"
10  Nairo Quintana (COL) Movistar Team + 40"

Stage 5[edit]

13 June 2019 - Boën-sur-Lignon to Voiron, 201 km (124.9 mi)[2]

Stage 5 result[18][19]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Wout Van Aert (BEL) Points classificationYouth classification Team Jumbo–Visma 5h 00' 34"
2  Sam Bennett (IRL) Bora–Hansgrohe + 0"
3  Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 0"
4  Lorenzo Manzin (FRA) Vital Concept–B&B Hotels + 0"
5  Clément Venturini (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 0"
6  Edvald Boasson Hagen (NOR) Team Dimension Data + 0"
7  Zdeněk Štybar (CZE) Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 0"
8  Sonny Colbrelli (ITA) Bahrain–Merida + 0"
9  Philippe Gilbert (BEL) Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 0"
10  Mads Würtz Schmidt (DEN) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 0"
General classification after stage 5[18][19]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Adam Yates (GBR) General classification Mitchelton–Scott 17h 28' 00"
2  Dylan Teuns (BEL) Bahrain–Merida + 4"
3  Tejay van Garderen (USA) EF Education First + 6"
4  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 7"
5  Wout Van Aert (BEL) Points classificationYouth classification Team Jumbo–Visma + 20"
6  Steven Kruijswijk (NED) Team Jumbo–Visma + 24"
7  Thibaut Pinot (FRA) Groupama–FDJ + 25"
8  Emanuel Buchmann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe + 26"
9  Alexey Lutsenko (KAZ) Astana + 30"
10  Nairo Quintana (COL) Movistar Team + 40"

Stage 6[edit]

14 June 2019 - Saint-Vulbas to Saint-Michel-de-Maurienne, 228 km (141.7 mi)[2]

Stage 6 result[20][21]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Deceuninck–Quick-Step 6h 00' 54"
2  Gregor Mühlberger (AUT) Bora–Hansgrohe + 0"
3  Alessandro De Marchi (ITA) CCC Team + 22"
4  Wout Poels (NED) Team Ineos + 6' 10"
5  Gorka Izagirre (ESP) Astana + 6' 10"
6  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 6' 10"
7  Jack Haig (AUS) Mitchelton–Scott + 6' 10"
8  Adam Yates (GBR) General classification Mitchelton–Scott + 6' 10"
9  Nairo Quintana (COL) Movistar Team + 6' 10"
10  Alexey Lutsenko (KAZ) Astana + 6' 10"
General classification after stage 6[20][21]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Adam Yates (GBR) General classification Mitchelton–Scott 23h 35' 04"
2  Dylan Teuns (BEL) Bahrain–Merida + 4"
3  Tejay van Garderen (USA) EF Education First + 6"
4  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 7"
5  Steven Kruijswijk (NED) Team Jumbo–Visma + 24"
6  Thibaut Pinot (FRA) Groupama–FDJ + 25"
7  Emanuel Buchmann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe + 26"
8  Alexey Lutsenko (KAZ) Astana + 30"
9  Nairo Quintana (COL) Movistar Team + 40"
10  Wout Poels (NED) Team Ineos + 40"

Stage 7[edit]

15 June 2019 - Saint-Genix-les-Villages to Les Sept Laux-Pipay, 133 km (82.6 mi)[2]

Tom Dumoulin, one of the pre-race favourites, withdrew from the race before the start of the stage.[22] During the stage, the weather started sunny, but the day's last two climbs occurred in heavy rain.[23]

Stage 7 result[24][25]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Wout Poels (NED) Team Ineos 4h 01' 34"
2  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) Astana + 1"
3  Emanuel Buchmann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe + 1"
4  Thibaut Pinot (FRA) Groupama–FDJ + 10"
5  Daniel Martin (IRL) UAE Team Emirates + 10"
6  Adam Yates (GBR) General classification Mitchelton–Scott + 10"
7  Romain Bardet (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 13"
8  Tejay van Garderen (USA) EF Education First + 16"
9  Dylan Teuns (BEL) Bahrain–Merida + 30"
10  Bjorg Lambrecht (BEL) Youth classification Lotto–Soudal + 34"
General classification after stage 7[24][25]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) General classification Astana 27h 36' 40"
2  Adam Yates (GBR) Mitchelton–Scott + 8"
3  Tejay van Garderen (USA) EF Education First + 20"
4  Emanuel Buchmann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe + 21"
5  Wout Poels (NED) Team Ineos + 28"
6  Dylan Teuns (BEL) Bahrain–Merida + 32"
7  Thibaut Pinot (FRA) Groupama–FDJ + 33"
8  Alexey Lutsenko (KAZ) Astana + 1' 12"
9  Steven Kruijswijk (NED) Team Jumbo–Visma + 1' 20"
10  Daniel Martin (IRL) UAE Team Emirates + 1' 21"

Stage 8[edit]

16 June 2019 - Cluses to Champéry (Switzerland), 113.5 km (70.5 mi)[2]

Adam Yates, second place on the general classification, abandoned the race in the final 50 km (31 mi).[26]

Stage 8 result[27][28]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Dylan van Baarle (NED) Team Ineos 3h 05' 48"
2  Jack Haig (AUS) Mitchelton–Scott + 0"
3  Carl Fredrik Hagen (NOR) Lotto–Soudal + 50"
4  Warren Barguil (FRA) Arkéa–Samsic + 1' 12"
5  Sepp Kuss (USA) Team Jumbo–Visma + 1' 12"
6  Sébastien Reichenbach (SUI) Groupama–FDJ + 1' 12"
7  Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Jersey white dots on blue.svg Deceuninck–Quick-Step + 1' 16"
8  Alexey Lutsenko (KAZ) Astana + 1' 59"
9  Xandro Meurisse (BEL) Wanty–Groupe Gobert + 1' 59"
10  Emanuel Buchmann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe + 1' 59"

Classification leadership table[edit]

In the Critérium du Dauphiné, four different jerseys were awarded. The most important was the general classification, which was calculated by adding each cyclist's finishing times on each stage. Time bonuses were awarded to the first three finishers on all stages except for the individual time trial: the stage winner won a ten-second bonus, with six and four seconds for the second and third riders respectively. The rider with the least accumulated time is the race leader, identified by a yellow jersey with a blue bar; the winner of this classification was considered the winner of the race.[29]

Points for the points classification
Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Stages 1–3 & 5 25 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6
Stages 4, 6–8 15 12 10 8 6 5 4 3 2 1

Additionally, there was a points classification, which awarded a green jersey. In the classification, cyclists received points for finishing in the top 10 in a stage. More points were awarded on the flatter stages in the opening half of the race.[29]

Points for the mountains classification
Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Points for Hors-category 15 12 10 8 6 5 4 3 2 1
Points for Category 1 10 8 6 4 2 1 0
Points for Category 2 5 3 2 1 0
Points for Category 3 2 1 0
Points for Category 4 1 0

There was also a mountains classification, the leadership of which was marked by a blue jersey with white polka dots. In the mountains classification, points towards the classification were won by reaching the top of a climb before other cyclists. Each climb was categorised as either hors, first, second, third, or fourth-category, with more points available for the higher-categorised climbs. Hors-category climbs awarded the most points; the first ten riders were able to accrue points, compared with the first six on first-category climbs, the first four on second-category, the first two on third-category and only the first for fourth-category.[29]

The fourth jersey represented the young rider classification, marked by a white jersey. This was decided the same way as the general classification, but only riders born on or after 1 January 1993 were eligible to be ranked in the classification. There was also a team classification, in which the times of the best three cyclists per team on each stage were added together; the leading team at the end of the race was the team with the lowest total time.[29]

Classification leadership by stage
Stage Winner General classification
A yellow jersey with a blue band.
Points classification
A green jersey.
Mountains classification
A blue jersey with white polka dots.
Young rider classification
A white jersey.
Team classification
A white jersey with a yellow number bib.
1 Edvald Boasson Hagen Edvald Boasson Hagen Edvald Boasson Hagen Casper Pedersen Wout van Aert Wanty–Groupe Gobert
2 Dylan Teuns Dylan Teuns Alexey Lutsenko Astana
3 Sam Bennett Wout van Aert
4 Wout van Aert Adam Yates EF Education First
5 Wout van Aert
6 Julian Alaphilippe Julian Alaphilippe Bjorg Lambrecht
7 Wout Poels Jakob Fuglsang Astana
8 Dylan Van Baarle
Final Jakob Fuglsang Wout Van Aert Julian Alaphilippe Bjorg Lambrecht Astana

Final classification standings[edit]

General classification[edit]

Final general classification[27][28]
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) General classification Astana 30h 44' 27"
2  Tejay van Garderen (USA) EF Education First + 20"
3  Emanuel Buchmann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe + 21"
4  Wout Poels (NED) Team Ineos + 28"
5  Thibaut Pinot (FRA) Groupama–FDJ + 33"
6  Dylan Teuns (BEL) Bahrain–Merida + 1' 11"
7  Alexey Lutsenko (KAZ) Astana + 1' 12"
8  Daniel Martin (IRL) UAE Team Emirates + 1' 21"
9  Nairo Quintana (COL) Movistar Team + 1' 24"
10  Romain Bardet (FRA) AG2R La Mondiale + 1' 38"

Points classification[edit]

Final points classification
Rank Rider Team Points
1  Wout van Aert (BEL) Jersey green.svg Team Jumbo–Visma 82
2  Edvald Boasson Hagen (NOR) Team Dimension Data 53
3  Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Jersey white dots on blue.svg Deceuninck–Quick-Step 49
4  Alexey Lutsenko (KAZ) Astana 48
5  Sam Bennett (IRL) Bora–Hansgrohe 47
6  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) General classification Astana 39
7  Wout Poels (NED) Team Ineos 31
8  Dylan Teuns (BEL) Bahrain–Merida 31
9  Nils Politt (GER) Team Katusha–Alpecin 31
10  Philippe Gilbert (BEL) Deceuninck–Quick-Step 30

Mountains classification[edit]

Final mountains classification
Rank Rider Team Points
1  Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) Jersey white dots on blue.svg Deceuninck–Quick-Step 75
2  Magnus Cort Nielsen (DEN) Astana 25
3  Wout Poels (NED) Team Ineos 15
4  Jack Haig (AUS) Mitchelton–Scott 14
5  Alessandro De Marchi (ITA) CCC Team 14
6  Dylan van Baarle (NED) Team Ineos 14
7  Lennard Hofstede (NED) Team Jumbo–Visma 14
8  Jakob Fuglsang (DEN) General classification Astana 12
9  Emanuel Buchmann (GER) Bora–Hansgrohe 12
10  Alexey Lutsenko (KAZ) Astana 10

Young rider classification[edit]

Final young rider classification
Rank Rider Team Time
1  Bjorg Lambrecht (BEL) Jersey white.svg Lotto–Soudal 30h 47' 44"
2  Neilson Powless (USA) Team Jumbo–Visma + 11' 42"
3  Sepp Kuss (USA) Team Jumbo–Visma + 16' 02"
4  Nils Politt (GER) Team Katusha–Alpecin + 24' 31"
5  Gianni Moscon (ITA) Team Ineos + 24' 42"
6  David Gaudu (FRA) Groupama–FDJ + 32' 55"
7  Robert Power (AUS) Team Sunweb + 33' 34"
8  Wout Van Aert (BEL) Team Jumbo–Visma + 41' 52"
9  Lennard Hofstede (NED) Team Jumbo–Visma + 47' 17"
10  Cristian Camilo Muñoz (COL) UAE Team Emirates + 49' 38"

Teams classification[edit]

Final teams classification
Rank Team Time
1 Astana 92h 19' 24"
2 Team Ineos + 12' 58"
3 Groupama–FDJ + 13' 22"
4 Team Jumbo–Visma + 18' 38"
5 Mitchelton–Scott + 27' 21"
6 EF Education First + 34' 30"
7 Movistar Team + 37' 47"
8 Bahrain–Merida + 38' 05"
9 Wanty–Groupe Gobert + 40' 17"
10 UAE Team Emirates + 49' 52"

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Critérium du Dauphiné 2019 : quels seront les moments clés de la course ?" [Critérium du Dauphiné 2019: What will be the key moments of the race?]. Le Dauphine (in French). 25 March 2019. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Arthurs-Brennan, Michelle (25 March 2019). "Critérium du Dauphiné 2019 route shakes up convention with new climbs and Swiss finish". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Organisers announce 'new challenges' for 2019 Criterium du Dauphine". Cycling News. 25 March 2019. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  4. ^ Arthurs-Brennan, Michelle (9 June 2019). "Critérium du Dauphiné 2019 start list: Froome, Porte, Bardet & Quintana go head to head". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  5. ^ Long, Jonny (9 June 2019). "Who are the bookmakers' favourites to win the Critérium du Dauphiné 2019?". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  6. ^ Benson, Daniel (7 June 2019). "Criterium du Dauphine: Full race preview". Cycling News. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  7. ^ a b O'Shea, Sadhbh (9 June 2019). "Boasson Hagen wins opening stage of the Criterium du Dauphine". Cycling News. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  8. ^ a b Long, Jonny (9 June 2019). "Edvald Boasson Hagen snatches victory from the breakaway on stage one of the Critérium du Dauphiné 2019". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  9. ^ a b "Criterium du Dauphine: Teuns wins stage 2". Cycling News. 10 June 2019. Retrieved 10 June 2019.
  10. ^ a b Long, Jonny (10 June 2019). "Dylan Teuns wins stage two and takes yellow jersey in the Critérium du Dauphiné 2019". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  11. ^ a b "Criterium du Dauphine: Sam Bennett wins stage 3". Cycling News. 11 June 2019. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  12. ^ a b Windsor, Richard (11 June 2019). "Sam Bennett a class above in sprint victory on Critérium du Dauphiné 2019 stage three". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  13. ^ "Chris Froome: Team Ineos confirm fractured femur and elbow". Cycling News. 12 June 2019. Retrieved 12 June 2019.
  14. ^ Ballinger, Alex (13 June 2019). "Chris Froome could be back racing in six months, according to surgeon". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 13 June 2019.
  15. ^ Ballinger, Alex (12 June 2019). "Chris Froome sustained 'multiple serious injuries' in Critérium du Dauphiné 2019 crash, Team Ineos confirm". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 12 June 2019.
  16. ^ a b Farrand, Stephen (12 June 2019). "Criterium du Dauphine: Van Aert wins stage 4". Cycling News. Retrieved 12 June 2019.
  17. ^ a b Ballinger, Alex (12 June 2019). "Wout van Aert dominates to take first WorldTour victory as Adam Yates steals race lead in Critérium du Dauphiné 2019 time trial". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 12 June 2019.
  18. ^ a b Farrand, Stephen (13 June 2019). "Criterium du Dauphine: Van Aert wins stage 5 in Voiron". Cycling News. Retrieved 13 June 2019.
  19. ^ a b Windsor, Richard (13 June 2019). "Wout van Aert doubles-up with phenomenal sprint victory on Critérium du Dauphiné stage five". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 13 June 2019.
  20. ^ a b Farrand, Stephen (14 June 2019). "Criterium du Dauphine: Alaphilippe wins stage 6". Cycling News. Retrieved 14 June 2019.
  21. ^ a b Arthurs-Brennan, Michelle (14 June 2019). "Julian Alaphilippe takes victory from day long break in Critérium du Dauphiné stage six". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  22. ^ Long, Jonny (15 June 2019). "Tom Dumoulin quits Critérium du Dauphiné to avoid further aggravating knee injury ahead of the Tour de France". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  23. ^ Long, Jonny (15 June 2019). "In pictures: Flooded finish line as storm drenches peloton on stage seven of the Critérium du Dauphiné". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  24. ^ a b Farrand, Stephen (15 June 2019). "Criterium du Dauphine: Wout Poels wins stage 7". Cycling News. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  25. ^ a b Long, Jonny (15 June 2019). "Wout Poels takes stage seven victory amid horrendous conditions at the Critérium du Dauphiné 2019". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  26. ^ Long, Jonny (16 June 2019). "Adam Yates abandons the Critérium du Dauphiné 2019". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  27. ^ a b "Criterium du Dauphine: Fuglsang takes overall victory". Cycling News. 16 June 2019. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  28. ^ a b Long, Jonny (16 June 2019). "Dylan Van Baarle takes final stage as Jakob Fuglsang wins the Critérium du Dauphiné 2019". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 16 June 2019.
  29. ^ a b c d "Règlement" [Regulations] (PDF). Critérium du Dauphiné (in French). Amaury Sport Organisation. Retrieved 4 June 2017.

External links[edit]