2019 Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters

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2019 Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters
Previous: 2018 Next: 2020
Sister series:
Super GT
Support series:
Formula European Masters
W Series
Porsche Carrera Cup Germany
Gary Paffett is the reigning Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters Drivers' Champion.

The 2019 Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters is planned to be twentieth season of the Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters since the series' resumption in 2000. Mercedes-AMG will withdraw from the championship after the 2018 season to focus on their Formula E entry. British sports car manufacturer Aston Martin is due to replace Mercedes-Benz which marks the first non-German entry in 22 years when Italian car manufacturer Alfa Romeo last entered the series under the International Touring Car Series name in 1996.[1][2]

The 2019 championship will see the series introduce regulations known as "Class One". These regulations will be shared between the Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters and the Japanese Super GT series' GT500 class from 2020, allowing entries to compete in both championships.[3]

Contracted teams and drivers[edit]

Manufacturer Car Team Driver name
Aston Martin Aston Martin Vantage AMR DTM Switzerland R-Motorsport United Kingdom Jake Dennis
Austria Ferdinand Habsburg
Spain Daniel Juncadella
United Kingdom Paul di Resta
Audi Audi RS5 Turbo DTM Germany Audi Sport Team Abt Sportsline Netherlands Robin Frijns
Switzerland Nico Müller
Germany Audi Sport Team Phoenix France Loïc Duval
Germany Mike Rockenfeller
Germany Audi Sport Team Rosberg United Kingdom Jamie Green
Germany René Rast
Belgium Audi Sport Team WRT Flag of None.svg TBA
Flag of None.svg TBA
BMW BMW M4 Turbo DTM Germany BMW Team RMG Germany Marco Wittmann
Germany Timo Glock
Canada Bruno Spengler
Belgium BMW Team RBM Austria Philipp Eng
Sweden Joel Eriksson
South Africa Sheldon van der Linde
Source:[4][5][6][7]

Team changes[edit]

Driver changes[edit]

Calendar[edit]

A nine-round calendar was announced in October 2018.

Round Circuit Race 1 Race 2
1 Germany Hockenheimring, Germany 4 May 5 May
2 Belgium Circuit Zolder, Belgium 18 May 19 May
3 Italy Misano World Circuit Marco Simoncelli, Italy 8 June 9 June
4 Germany Norisring, Germany 6 July 7 July
5 Netherlands TT Circuit Assen, Netherlands 20 July 21 July
6 United Kingdom Brands Hatch, Great Britain 10 August 11 August
7 Germany EuroSpeedway Lausitz, Germany 24 August 25 August
8 Germany Nürburgring, Germany 14 September 15 September
9 Germany Hockenheimring, Germany 5 October 6 October
Source:[13]

Calendar changes[edit]

  • With the adoption of Class One regulations, the series will share two rounds with the Super GT championship. One is planned to be held in Europe and the other in Asia. A balance of performance formula will be applied to ensure parity between DTM cars and Super GT as Super GT will not adopt Class One regulations until 2020.[14]
  • The rounds at the Hungaroring, Red Bull Ring and Zandvoort were removed from the schedule. The series will instead make its début at the TT Circuit Assen and return to Circuit Zolder for the first time since 2002. Meanwhile the Misano round will revert to a daytime start time instead of nighttime.[15]

Changes[edit]

Technical regulations[edit]

  • Turbochargers returned to the Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters for the first time since the 1990 Deutsche Tourenwagen Meisterschaft season. The engines are 2.0 L (122 cu in) inline-4 single-turbocharged engines, tuned to produce approximately 620 horsepower with a 10,000 RPM limit.[16] All engines will remain run Aral Ultimate 102 RON unleaded fuel. The naturally aspirated V8 engines that required since 2000 were permanently retired. The all-new engine configuration also incorporate the IndyCar-style push-to-pass overtake assist systems in a bid to improve the racing spectacle, the push-to-pass system will produce around 30 hp (22 kW) and will be used by driver 12 times in a race.[17]
  • The single-element rear wing returns for the first time since 2016 but will be wider and thus the revision of drag reduction systems to improve overtaking maneuver by activating within one second of a driver in front.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Klein, Jamie (25 July 2017). "Mercedes to quit DTM after 2018, confirms Formula E entry". Motorsport Network. Retrieved 25 July 2017.
  2. ^ "Aston Martin DTM entry announced for 2019". Retrieved 2018-10-11.
  3. ^ Errington, Tom (23 June 2018). "DTM and Super GT sign off Class One regs". Motorsport Network. Retrieved 23 June 2018.
  4. ^ "Everything stays different". Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters. 19 December 2018. Retrieved 19 December 2018.
  5. ^ Aller, Tamara (8 December 2018). "BMW confirm Wittmann, Eng, Eriksson, Spengler and Glock for the 2019 DTM". touringcartimes.com. Retrieved 8 December 2018.
  6. ^ a b Khorounzhiy, Valentin (17 January 2019). "Rookie van der Linde completes BMW's DTM roster". motorsport.com. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  7. ^ Villemant, Thibaut (February 19, 2019). "Ferdinand Habsburg sur Aston Martin en DTM (Ferdinand Habsburg on Aston Martin in DTM)". AUTOhebdo.fr. Retrieved February 19, 2019.
  8. ^ https://www.autosport.com/dtm/news/139321/rmotorsport-aston-replaces-mercedes-in-dtm
  9. ^ https://www.speedcafe.com/2018/10/12/aston-martin-joining-dtm-in-2019/
  10. ^ "WRT becomes Audi customer team in the DTM". Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters. 12 October 2018. Retrieved 12 October 2018.
  11. ^ >"Hyundai confirm Tarquini, Michelisz, Catsburg and Farfus for 2019". TouringCarTimes. 3 December 2018. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  12. ^ Dagys, John. "Farfus Quits DTM; Shifts Focus to GT Racing – Sportscar365". sportscar365.com. Retrieved 2019-01-06.
  13. ^ "2019 DTM calendar with new circuits and new support". Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters. 12 October 2018. Retrieved 12 October 2018.
  14. ^ Herrero, Dan (24 June 2018). "DTM, Super GT seal move to Class 1 regulations". Speedcafe. Retrieved 24 June 2018.
  15. ^ Khorounzhiy, Valentin (12 January 2019). "DTM abandons night-race format at Misano round for 2019". autosport.com. Autosport. Retrieved 12 January 2019.
  16. ^ Adam, Mitchell (20 January 2016). "DTM delays new engines and Class One rules to 2019". Autosport. Retrieved 20 January 2016.
  17. ^ Errington, Tom (16 January 2019). "DTM adopts IndyCar-style push-to-pass for 2019". motorsport.com. motorsport.com. Retrieved 16 January 2019.

External links[edit]