2019 Indonesian general election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
2019 Indonesian presidential election

← 2014 17 April 2019[1][2] 2024 →
Turnout81.93%
Green Arrow Up Darker.svg12.35 pp
  Capres nomor urut 01 2019 - 2024 Joko Widodo dan Ma'ruf Amin.jpeg Capres nomor urut 02 2019 - 2024 Prabowo Subianto dan Sandiaga Uno.jpeg
Candidate Joko Widodo Prabowo Subianto
Party PDI-P Gerindra
Alliance
Running mate Ma'ruf Amin Sandiaga Uno
Popular vote 85,607,362 68,650,239
Percentage 55.50% 44.50%

Map of 2019 Indonesian Presidential Election - Provinces.svg
Results of the election per provinces showing the candidates with the largest share of votes in 813,350 voting stations, as of 21 May 2019. Joko Widodo: red; Prabowo Subianto: tan.

President before election

Joko Widodo
PDI-P

Elected President

Joko Widodo
PDI-P

2019 Indonesian legislative election

Party Leader % Seats ±
PDI-P Megawati Sukarnoputri 19.33% 128 +19
Gerindra Prabowo Subianto 12.57% 78 +5
Golkar Airlangga Hartarto 12.31% 85 -6
PKB Muhaimin Iskandar 9.69% 58 +11
Nasdem Surya Paloh 9.05% 59 +23
PKS Sohibul Iman 8.21% 50 +10
Demokrat Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono 7.77% 54 -7
PAN Zulkifli Hasan 6.84% 44 -4
PPP Suharso Monoarfa 4.52% 19 -20
This lists parties that won seats. See the complete results below.
Speakers before Speakers-designate
MPR: Zulkifli Hasan
DPR: Bambang Soesatyo
DPD: Oesman Sapta Odang
MPR:
DPR:
DPD:
National emblem of Indonesia Garuda Pancasila.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Indonesia
Pancasila (national philosophy)
Constitution
Flag of Indonesia.svg Indonesia portal

General elections were held in Indonesia on 17 April 2019. For the first time in the country's history, the president, the vice president, members of the People's Consultative Assembly (MPR), and members of local legislative bodies were elected on the same day with over 190 million eligible voters. Sixteen parties participated in the elections nationally, including four new parties.

The presidential election, the fourth in the country's history, used a direct, simple majority system, with incumbent Indonesian President Joko Widodo, known as Jokowi, running for re-election with senior Muslim cleric Ma'ruf Amin as his running mate against former general Prabowo Subianto and former Jakarta vice governor Sandiaga Uno for a five-year term between 2019 and 2024. The election was a re-match of the 2014 presidential election, in which Widodo defeated Prabowo. The legislative election, which was the 12th such election for Indonesia, saw over 240,000 candidates competing for over 20,000 seats in the MPR and local councils for provinces and cities/regencies, with over 8,000 competing for the People's Representative Council (DPR) seats alone. The election was described as "one of the most complicated single-day ballots in global history".[3]

On 21 May 2019, the General Elections Commission declared Jokowi and Amin as the winners of the presidential election, having secured over 55 percent of the votes with more than 85 million votes. At the same time, Widodo's PDI-P finished first in the People's Representative Council (DPR) election with 19.33%, followed by Prabowo's Gerindra with 12.57%. The next top parties by the number of votes are Golkar, the National Awakening Party (PKB), the Nasdem Party , and the Prosperous Justice Party (PKS).

Following the election, it emerged of the more than 7 million election workers, 569 had died during the lengthy voting and counting process. Prabowo's campaign team claimed the deaths were linked to fraud that disadvantaged him.[4] As of 9 May 2019, the election commission (KPU) said the dead included 456 election officers, 91 supervisory agents and 22 police officers.[5]

In the early morning of 22 May 2019, supporters of Prabowo protested in Jakarta against Jokowi's victory. The protest turned into a riot which left six people dead and over 200 injured.[6]

Background[edit]

Elections in Indonesia were previously held separately, with a 2008 elections law regulating that presidential and legislative elections be held at least three months apart from one another. Following a 2013 Constitutional Court lawsuit, however, it was decided that the 2019 elections - which would have been the 12th legislative election and 4th presidential election - would be held simultaneously. The stated intent of the simultaneous election was to reduce associated costs and minimize transactional politics, in addition to increasing voter turnout.[7][8]

In the 2014 presidential election, Jakarta governor Joko Widodo defeated former general Prabowo Subianto to become the seventh President of Indonesia. Despite initially having a minority government, Jokowi later managed to secure the support of Golkar and the United Development Party, giving him control of the legislature.[9][10] In the legislative elections of the same year, former opposition party PDI-P managed to secure the largest share in the DPR, ahead of Golkar and Gerindra.[11]

Despite plans to introduce electronic voting, the DPR in March 2017 announced it would not mandate e-voting in the 2019 elections because of hacking fears and because of the lack of nationwide internet coverage.[12] On 7 April 2017, the General Elections Commission (KPU), the Elections Supervisory Agency (Bawaslu) and the Home Affairs Ministry held a meeting with the People's Representative Council's special committee to deliberate a draft law concerning the 2019 elections.[13] The Chairman of the House special committee deliberating the bill, Lukman Edy, announced on 25 April 2017 that Wednesday, 17 April 2019, had been agreed upon as the date for the elections.[14]

Nominations of candidates for the national and regional legislatures as well as candidates for president and vice president were completed in September 2018. The campaign period was from 13 October 2018 to 13 April 2019 followed by a three-day election silence before the voting day on 17 April. The final results will be announced on 22 May. The inauguration of the president and vice president is scheduled for Sunday, 20 October 2019.[15]

Electoral system[edit]

Election workers dress up in traditional Minang wedding costumes at this polling station in West Sumatra.

The election was regulated by the Law No. 7 of 2017.[16][17] The General Elections Commission (Indonesian: Komisi Pemilihan Umum, KPU), a legally independent government body was responsible for organizing the election.[18] In addition, the vote was monitored by the Elections Supervisory Agency (Bawaslu), which also had the authority to rule on violations of election rules (e.g. administrative errors, vote buying, etc).[19] Any ethical violations committed by either Bawaslu or the KPU were to be handled by the Elections Organizer Honor Council (Indonesian: Dewan Kehormatan Penyelenggara Pemilu, (DKPP)), which comprised one member from each body and five others recommended by the government.[20]

Voters were given five ballot papers:[a] for the president and vice president, Regional Representative Council (DPD), People's Representative Council (DPR), provincial council, and regency/municipal council (DPRD Provinsi and DPRD Kabupaten/Kota) members.[23] Voters used a nail to poke a hole in the ballot paper indicating which party/candidate they wished to vote for,[24] and then dip their fingers in ink as a precaution against voter fraud.[25] Tabulation of the votes was done manually on paper.[26] KPU is legally required to announce the results of the election within 35 days of the vote, i.e., before 22 May 2019.[27]

Presidential vote[edit]

In order to run for the presidency, a candidate had to be supported by political parties totaling 20 percent of the seats in the People's Representative Council or 25 percent of the popular vote in the previous legislative election i.e. 2014.[28][17]:Art. 222 Political parties were allowed to remain neutral if they were unable to propose their own candidate. However, if a neutral party/parties was able to endorse their own candidate (i.e. 20 percent of seats/25 percent of popular votes), they were required to do so, or be barred from participating in the next election.[17]:Art. 235[29]

The voting procedure followed a two round system, with voters simply choosing one of the candidate pairs. A winning candidate was required to win a majority, and is also required to win at least 20 percent of the votes in over half of Indonesia's provinces (i.e. 18 provinces). If no candidate pairs had fulfilled the criterion, the election would have been repeated with a maximum of two participants.[17]:Art. 416

Legislative vote[edit]

People's Representative Council Candidates from North Sumatra's 1st electoral district

Members of both the People's Representative Council (DPR) and the Regional People's Representative Councils (DPRD) were elected from multi-member electoral districts through voting with an open list system,[17][30] and seat distribution is done with the Sainte-Laguë method in contrast to previous elections which utilized the Hare quota.[31] There was a gender quota requiring at least 30 percent of registered candidates to be female.[32]

A 4 percent parliamentary threshold was set for parties to be represented in the DPR, though candidates could still win seats in the regional councils provided they won sufficient votes.[30][33] There were 575 DPR seats contested - up from 560 in 2014.[30] Nationally, there were 80 DPR electoral districts, with 272 provincial and 2,206 municipal electoral districts.[34] Candidates for the Regional Representative Council were not allowed be members of a political party. Four members were elected for each province – a total of 136.[35]

Voters[edit]

A voting station in Samarinda, East Kalimantan.
Postal voting documents sent to an Indonesian voter in the United Kingdom.

The voting age for the election is 17, or less if already married.[36] Indonesians living overseas could vote in either the embassies and consulates, mobile polling stations, or by post, with the voting taking place on 8–14 April.[37]

On 5 September 2018, the KPU announced there were 187 million registered voters – 185,732,093 in Indonesia and 2,049,791 voting abroad. They were to vote at 805,075 polling stations in Indonesia, with mail-in votes and 620 polling stations outside the country.[38] The large number of polling stations (which was updated in April 2019 to 810,329)[39] meant that there was an average of 200 voters per station, compared to 600 in the 2014 election.[40] Around 17 million people are involved in some way in running the election, including the election officers, polling station guards, and registered witnesses from the candidates and parties.[25]

Later on, 670,000 names were removed following complaints of duplicate names in the voter registry, lowering the total voter count to around 187.1 million.[41] Further investigations resulted in over 1 million duplicate voters discovered in Papua alone in October, out of the initial voter registry of 3 million.[42] Bawaslu commissioners in early September estimated that there would be around 2 million duplicate voters,[43] while opposition party Gerindra stated that they only had 137 million voters in their internal registry, and claimed that they found 25 million duplicate names in the registry.[44] The figure was later updated to 192.8 million voters, including 2 million overseas.[45]

Due to various logistical issues, namely with distribution of ballot papers, 2,249 polling stations had to conduct follow up voting.[46] A repeat vote was also recommended in the Kuala Lumpur embassy due to suspected voter fraud and a follow-up election in Sydney due to the voting station there closing early.[47]

Contesting parties[edit]

A total of 27 political parties had registered with the General Elections Commission to run in the election.[48] On 17 February 2018, the General Elections Commission announced that 14 parties had passed the verification precedes and would be eligible to contest the legislative election. The Crescent Star Party subsequently appealed to the Elections Supervisory Agency (Bawaslu), which ruled it could participate, making a total of 15 parties.[49][50] The Indonesian Justice and Unity Party's appeal to Bawaslu was rejected, but an 11 April ruling by the National Administrative Court (Pengadilan Tata Usaha Negara) decreed that the party was eligible to contest in the election.[51] A further four parties contested in Aceh only.[52]

Ballot
number
English name Indonesian name Leader
1 National Awakening Party Partai Kebangkitan Bangsa (PKB) Muhaimin Iskandar
2 Great Indonesia Movement Party Partai Gerakan Indonesia Raya (Gerindra) Prabowo Subianto
3 Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle Partai Demokrasi Indonesia Perjuangan (PDI-P) Megawati Sukarnoputri
4 Golkar Party Partai Golongan Karya Airlangga Hartarto
5 Nasdem Party Partai Nasdem Surya Paloh
6 Indonesian Transformation Movement Party Partai Gerakan Perubahan Indonesia (Partai Garuda) Ahmad Ridha Sabana
7 Berkarya Party Partai Berkarya Tommy Suharto
8 Prosperous Justice Party Partai Keadilan Sejahtera (PKS) Sohibul Iman
9 Indonesian Unity Party Partai Persatuan Indonesia (Perindo) Hary Tanoesoedibjo
10 United Development Party Partai Persatuan Pembangunan (PPP) Suharso Monoarfa
11 Indonesian Solidarity Party Partai Solidaritas Indonesia (PSI) Grace Natalie
12 National Mandate Party Partai Amanat Nasional (PAN) Zulkifli Hasan
13 People's Conscience Party Partai Hati Nurani Rakyat (Hanura) Oesman Sapta Odang
14 Democratic Party Partai Demokrat Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono
19[b] Crescent Star Party Partai Bulan Bintang (PBB) Yusril Ihza Mahendra
20 Indonesian Justice and Unity Party Partai Keadilan dan Persatuan Indonesia (PKPI) Diaz Hendropriyono

The four Aceh local parties were:[54]

Ballot
number
English name Indonesian name Leader
15 Aceh Party Partai Aceh Muzakir Manaf
16 Independent Voice of the Acehnese Party Partai Suara Independen Rakyat Aceh Muhammad Nazar
17 Aceh Regional Party Partai Daerah Aceh Jamaluddin Thaib
18 Aceh Nanggroe Party Partai Nanggroe Aceh Irwandi Yusuf

Presidential election[edit]

Candidates[edit]

In July 2017, the People's Representative Council (DPR) confirmed that only parties or coalitions with at least 20% of seats in the legislature, or 25% of votes in the previous election, would be eligible to submit a presidential candidate.[55] Requirements for presidential/vice presidential candidates were similar, with only either Indonesia-born lifelong Indonesian citizens or naturalized citizens who were born abroad and obtained a foreign citizenship outside their own will being eligible to run with a minimum age of 40 and a requirement to "have a belief in the One and Only God". If the candidates had spouses, they also had to be Indonesian citizens. A criminal record resulting in over 5 years of incarceration or an active bankruptcy also barred a candidate from running. A term limit of two terms prevented incumbent Vice President Jusuf Kalla from running as a vice presidential candidate.[56][17]:Art. 169

Except for the National Mandate Party, all parties in the government coalition supported a second term for Jokowi.[57] In total, nine parties running in the legislative election supported Jokowi, with the coalition having formally met by May 2018. Of those nine parties, the Indonesian Unity Party and Indonesian Solidarity Party were participating for the first time in elections.[58] Shortly after Ma'ruf was declared as Jokowi's VP candidate, Jokowi's coalition member party PPP leader Muhammad Romahurmuziy stated that the coalition, dubbed Koalisi Indonesia Kerja (lit. "Working Indonesia Coalition"),[59] was final, and was not accepting any more parties.[60] In total, the coalition gained over 62 percent of the votes during the 2014 legislative election and controlled 337 of 560 DPR seats.

Aside from Gerindra, parties backing Prabowo did not confirm their support until late: PAN and PKS on 9 August 2018,[61][62] Demokrat and Berkarya on 10 August,[63][64] the registration day, though the coalition had existed prior.[65] PAN withdrew from the government coalition, resulting in the resignation of bureaucratic reform minister and PAN member Asman Abnur.[66] The pro-Prabowo coalition was named Koalisi Indonesia Adil Makmur (lit. "Prosperous and Just Indonesia Coalition").[67] There are five parties in the coalition – including Berkarya, a new party[68] – which won 36 percent of the 2014 legislative vote, and holds 223 of 560 DPR seats.

Two parties – the Crescent Star Party/PBB (participated in the 2014 election, but did not gain a national legislature seat) and the Garuda Party (a new party) – initially did not endorse either candidate. The latter's secretary Abdullah Mansyuri stated the party was focusing on the legislative elections, while PBB chairman Yusril Ihza Mahendra said neither Jokowi nor Prabowo's camp invited PBB.[69][70] Later on, however, he would join Jokowi's campaign team as its lawyer.[71] On 27 January 2019, PBB officially endorsed Jokowi.[72] The Aceh Nanggroe Party – which held 3 of the 81 seats in Aceh's provincial council – also endorsed Jokowi in January 2019.[73]

Registration for presidential candidates was opened between 4 and 10 August 2018 at the General Elections Commission (KPU) head office in Jakarta.[74] Neither candidate declared their vice presidential pick until 9 August 2018, when both declared their running mates. Both picks were considered "surprising", with Jokowi selecting senior cleric and politician Ma'ruf Amin despite early reports that former Chief Justice of the Constitutional Court Mahfud MD would be selected. Prabowo's last-minute selection of businessman and Jakarta vice governor Sandiaga Uno – close to midnight on that day – was also unexpected, Sandiaga not having been mentioned in the early phases of the selection.[75][76]

Known as Party English name Supporting DPR seats (2014) DPR seats % (2014) Legislative votes % (2014)
PDI–P Partai Demokrasi Indonesia Perjuangan Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle Nominee: Joko Widodo (PDI-P)
Running mate: Ma'ruf Amin (Independent)

Campaign Logo of Jokowi-Amin.svg
Majority coalition:
PDI–P/Golkar/PPP/
Hanura/NasDem/PKB
338 / 560
60.36% 63.62%
Golkar Partai Golongan Karya Golkar
PPP Partai Persatuan Pembangunan United Development Party
Hanura Partai Hati Nurani Rakyat People's Conscience Party
NasDem Partai Nasdem Nasdem Party
PKB Partai Kebangkitan Bangsa National Awakening Party
PBB Partai Bulan Bintang Crescent Star Party
PKPI Partai Keadilan dan Persatuan Indonesia Indonesian Justice and Unity Party
Perindo Partai Persatuan Indonesia Perindo Party
PSI Partai Solidaritas Indonesia Indonesian Solidarity Party
Gerindra Partai Gerakan Indonesia Raya Great Indonesia Movement Party Nominee: Prabowo Subianto (Gerindra)
Running mate: Sandiaga Uno (Gerindra, later Independent)[77]

Campaign Logo of Prabowo-Sandi.svg
Minority coalition:
Gerindra/PKS/PAN/Demokrat
222 / 560
39.64% 36.38%
PKS Partai Keadilan Sejahtera Prosperous Justice Party
PAN Partai Amanat Nasional National Mandate Party
PD Partai Demokrat Democratic Party[c]
Berkarya Partai Berkarya Berkarya Party

Nominated[edit]

Others[edit]

Other individuals who expressed an intent, received political support, or were touted as prospective presidential candidates included son of former president Yudhoyono and 2017 Jakarta gubernatorial candidate Agus Harimurti Yudhoyono,[79][80] former speaker of the People's Consultative Assembly Amien Rais,[81][82] Governor of Jakarta and former minister of education and culture Anies Baswedan,[83][84] all of whom subsequently endorsed Prabowo, and incumbent Vice President of Indonesia Jusuf Kalla, who later expressed support for Jokowi.[85][86]

Campaigns[edit]

The official campaigning period lasted around 6 months, starting with a "peaceful campaign" declaration on 23 September 2018, and the final day on 13 April 2019.[87] Prior to the start of the campaign, both parties submitted their campaign teams to the KPU, with Jokowi's team being led by businessman Erick Thohir while Prabowo's was led by former Indonesian National Armed Forces commander Djoko Santoso.[88]

Debates[edit]

Presidential voting ballot sent by mail for Indonesian diaspora. The ballot is punched at section 01, in favour of Joko Widodo.

The KPU scheduled five debates to be held in 2019, the same number as in the previous campaign in 2014. People's Representative Council member and National Mandate Party Central Committee chairman Yandri Susanto proposed that the debates should be held in English, but the KPU decided that the debates would be held in Indonesian.[89][90] The questions from the KPU which were to be discussed in the debate were provided to the candidates prior to the events, with the Prabowo campaign team criticizing this decision as belittling the candidates.[91]

The first debate, held on 17 January 2019, focused on legal, human rights, terrorism and corruption issues, and was moderated by Ira Koesno and Imam Priyono.[92] During the early stages of the debate, both candidates described their visions, with Jokowi admitting the difficulty of solving old human rights cases and promising to strengthen law enforcement institutions - a sentiment shared by Prabowo, who also called for an increase in the salaries of civil servants in order to reduce corruption.[93]

The second debate was held on 17 February 2019, with topics covering energy, food, infrastructure, natural resources and the environment, and was moderated by news presenters Anisha Dasuki and Tommy Tjokro.[94] During the second debate, both candidates utilized numbers and statistics more than in the first. In one segment of the debate, Jokowi questioned Prabowo on his stance about unicorn companies, briefly confusing Prabowo and resulting in the country's internet users posting memes related to the animal unicorn.[95] During debates on agrarian land reform, Jokowi pointed out Prabowo's ownership of 340,000 hectares (840,000 acres) of land[96] - which Prabowo stated he held under cultivation rights instead of full ownership and was willing to return to the state.[97][98]

The third debate, involving the vice presidential candidates, covered education, health, labor, social affairs and culture, and was held on 17 March 2019.[99] On 30 March 2019, the fourth debate was held, which was centered around defense and foreign policy.[100] The fifth and final debate was held on 13 April 2019, and was focused on Economics, Public Welfare, Industry, Trade and Investment.[101]

Social media[edit]

With millennials making up around two-fifths of Indonesia's population, there were significant efforts by both sides to appeal to the age group.[102] A major social media-centered campaign, dubbed #2019GantiPresiden, initiated by Prosperous Justice Party politician Mardani Ali Sera, also emerged, holding rallies in multiple cities until they were disallowed following clashes with Jokowi supporters.[103]

Before the campaign period started, observers had expected that hoaxes and fake news would become rampant, primarily spreading through social media and WhatsApp, with one observer noting that the government was limited in its impact in handling the fake news as it may be framed as favoring the incumbent in the election.[104][105] One particular case involved activist and Prabowo campaigner Ratna Sarumpaet who falsely claimed to have been assaulted, initially causing many prominent opposition politicians to voice support for her, before she admitted that she had lied following a police investigation. She was prosecuted and forced to resign from the campaign team, with Prabowo personally apologizing for spreading the hoax.[106] Both sides formed dedicated anti-hoax groups to counter attacks on social media,[87][107] with the Indonesian government holding weekly fake news briefings.[108]

Amid public apathy toward mainstream parties and candidates, a pairing of spoof candidates, "Nurhadi-Aldo" (abbreviated as dildo), gained popularity on social media, with 400,000 Instagram followers within the first month of its creation. The account parodied typical political aesthetics and utilized vulgar acronyms.[109]

Finances[edit]

On 23 September, both campaign teams submitted an initial budget, with Jokowi's campaign team reporting an initial balance of Rp 11.9 billion and Prabowo's team reporting Rp 2 billion. Indonesia Corruption Watch observers deemed the initial numbers "unrealistic" (Widodo's campaign team spent Rp 293 billion in 2014, Prabowo's spent Rp 166 billion), though representatives from both campaign teams noted that the balance was just an initial balance, and would increase throughout the campaigning period.[110]

For the Prabowo Subianto campaign in particular, Uno paid for the majority of campaign fees, with his contribution comprising 70 percent of the reported campaign funds (Rp 95.4 billion out of Rp 135 billion). Uno stated in an interview with Bloomberg that he spent around USD 100 million on the election.[111]

Endorsements[edit]

Polls[edit]

By late 2018, Jokowi was ahead of Prabowo in most surveys.[112][113] The table below gives detailed survey results from a variety of organizations.

NOTE: The accuracy of political surveys in Indonesia varies significantly, with some having little transparency. It should also be noted that some agencies also act as political consultants and surveys are often paid for by candidates.[114] Caution should hence be exercised in using the polling data below.

Polls conducted after nominations
Polling organization Date Sample size Widodo Prabowo
Charta Politika 5-10 April 2019 2,000 55.7 38.8
SMRC 5-8 April 2019 2,285 56.8 37.0
LSI 18-26 March 2019 1,200 60 40
SMRC 24 February-5 March 2019 2,479 57.6 31.8
Kompas 22 February-5 March 2019 2,000 49.2 37.4
LSI 18-25 January 2019 1,200 54.8 31.0
Median 6-15 January 2019 1,500 47.9 38.7
Charta Politika 22 December 2018–2 January 2019 2,000 53.2 34.1
LSI 10-19 November 2018 1,200 53.2 31.2
Median 4-16 November 2018 1,200 47.7 35.5
Kompas 24 September-5 October 2018 1,200 52.6 32.7
SMRC 7-24 September 2018 1,074 60.4 29.8
Indikator 1-6 September 2018 1,220 57.7 32.3
Y-Publica 13-23 August 2018 1,200 52.7 28.6
LSI 12-19 August 2018 1,200 52.2 29.5
Alvara 12-18 August 2018 1,500 53.5 35.2

NOTE: See warning above

Polls conducted before nominations
Polling organization Date Sample size Widodo Prabowo Kalla Nurmantyo Yudhoyono Baswedan Purnama Tanoesoedibjo Hasan Iskandar
RTK 23 July-1 Aug 2018 1,610 42.5 21.3 0.4 1.6 3.1 0.8 0.4 0.2 1.8
Median 19 April-5 May 2018 2,100 35.70 22.60 6.80 5.20
Median (head to head) 19 April-5 May 2018 2,100 58.20 26.60
Polcomm 3-6 May 2018 1,200 36.42 27.17 4.92 4.33 3.5 2.5
IDM (head to head) 28 Apr - 8 May 2018 2,450 29.8 50.1
IDM 28 Apr - 8 May 2018 2,450 26.4 40.1 8.2 6.3
RTK 21 Apr - 21 May 2018 1,610 38.5 20.5 1.6 2.7 0.9
Indo Barometer 15-22 Apr 2018 2,000 40.7 19.7 1.2 2.7 2.0 2.4 0.9 1.0 0.3 0.5
Charta Politika 13-19 Apr 2018 2,000 51.2 23.3 2.0 5.5 2.7 3.4 0.6
INES 12 - 28 April 2018 2,180 27.7 50.2 7.4
Cyrus 27 March-3 April 2018 1,230 56.7 19.8 1.6 3.2 2.1 1.6 2.2
Median 24 March-6 April 2018 1,200 36.2 20.4 4.3 7.0 1.8 2.0 1.6
Kompas 21 March-1 April 2018 1,200 55.9 14.1 1.8
KedaiKOPI 19-27 March 2018 1,135 48.3 21.5 2.1 1.1 1.1 0.5
Populi Center 7–16 February 2018 1,200 64.3 25.3
Median 1–9 February 2018 1,000 35.0 21.2 5.5 3.3 4.5
Poltracking 27 January-3 February 2018 1,200 45.4 19.8 0.5 0.3 0.8 0.6 0.3
Indo Barometer 23–30 January 2018 1,200 32.7 19.1 2.1 2.7 2.5 2.5 2.9 0.8
SMRC 7–13 December 2017 1,220 38.9 10.5 0.9 1.2 1.7 1.3
PolMark[permanent dead link] 13–25 November 2017 2,600 50.2 22.0 0.7 2.0 4.8 4.5 1.6
Indo Barometer 15–23 November 2017 1,200 34.9 12.1 3.2 2.5 3.6 3.3
Poltracking 8–15 November 2017 2,400 41.5 18.2 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.5
Populi Center 19–26 October 2017 1,200 49.4 21.7 0.4 2.0 0.7 0.7
PolMark 22 October 2017 2,250 41.2 21 2.9
Median 2 October 2017 1,000 36.2 23.2 2.6 2.8 4.4
Indikator 17–24 September 2017 1,220 34.2 11.5 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.5 1
SMRC 3–10 September 2017 1,220 38.9 12 0.8 0.3 0.3 0.9 0.8 0.6
SMRC 14–20 May 2017 1,500 53.7 37.2
SMRC 14–20 May 2017 1,500 34.1 17.2 0.4 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.9 1.1
Kompas April 2017 41.6 22.1

NOTE: See warning above

Legislative election[edit]

Voters receiving ballots for the election.
Voters casting their choice for the election. Voters had wait for several minutes for their name to be called before voting.

Contested seats[edit]

Legislative elections in Indonesia: April 2019[115]
Level Institution Seats contested Change from 2014
National People's Representative Council
Dewan Perwakilan Rakyat (DPR)
575 Increase15
National Regional Representative Council
Dewan Perwakilan Daerah (DPD)
136 Increase4[d]
Provincial
Provinsi
Provincial People's Regional Representative Council
Dewan Perwakilan Rakyat Daerah Provinsi (DPRD I)
2,207 Increase95
Regency/Municipal
Kabupaten/Kota
Regency/Municipal People's Regional Representative Council
Dewan Perwakilian Rakyat Daerah Kabupaten/Kota (DPRD II)
17,610 Increase715
Total 20,528 Increase829
A list of candidates for the Regional Representative Council, from the Special Region of Jakarta constituency.

Candidates[edit]

All legislative candidates had to be Indonesian citizens, over 21 years old, senior high school (or equivalent) graduates, and have never been convicted for a crime resulting with a sentence of 5 years or more. In addition, the candidates for the People's Representative Council or local legislatures had to be endorsed by a political party, and were required to resign from their non-legislative government offices - except for the president and vice president - or their state-owned company positions. Legislators running for reelection or for another body through a new political party were also required to resign.[117]

For the People's Representative Council, there were 7,968 candidates - 4,774 male and 3,194 female - contesting the 575 seats for an average of 13.86 candidates per seat available. Just three parties - Nasdem, PAN and PKB - used their entire quota of 575 candidates, with the Indonesian Justice and Unity Party registering only 137 candidates.[118] Formappi, an NGO, found that 529 out of 560 (94 percent) incumbent DPR members were running for reelection.[119]

The election for Regional Representative Council members required candidates to not be a member of a political party, with a total of 807 candidates competing for the 136 seats. The incumbent speaker, Oesman Sapta Odang, was briefly removed from the candidacy list due to him not resigning from Hanura, though he was restored when he submitted a resignation letter. Although all provinces were allocated 4 seats, the number of candidates varied from 10 for West Papua to 49 for West Java.[120][121] There were approximately 245,000 candidates running for all legislative seats across the country.[122] For example, 1,586 candidates were approved to run for the 120-seat West Java Provincial Council alone.[123]

Details for People's Representative Council candidate numbers[124]
Ballot No.
Party Districts Candidates Male Female
1 National Awakening Party PKB 80 575 355 220
2 Great Indonesia Movement Party Gerindra 79 569 360 209
3 Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle PDIP 80 573 358 215
4 Party of the Functional Groups Golkar 80 574 357 217
5 National Democratic Party NasDem 80 575 354 221
6 Garuda Party Garuda 80 225 115 110
7 Berkarya Party Berkarya 80 554 341 213
8 Prosperous Justice Party PKS 80 533 321 212
9 Indonesian Unity Party Perindo 80 568 347 221
10 United Development Party PPP 80 554 321 233
11 Indonesian Solidarity Party PSI 80 574 300 274
12 National Mandate Party PAN 80 575 356 219
13 People's Conscience Party Hanura 79 427 250 177
14 Democratic Party Demokrat 80 573 350 223
19 Crescent Star Party PBB 80 382 228 154
20 Indonesian Justice and Unity Party PKPI 61 137 61 76

Finances[edit]

The political parties, like the presidential candidates, were required to submit their campaign budgets to the KPU. Aside from donations from sympathizers and members, the parties which participated in the 2014 election also receive money from the government amounting to Rp 1,000 (USD 0.071) per vote received.[125][126] By January 2019, the national political parties have collectively reported campaign donations totaling Rp 445 billion (USD 31.6 million).[127]

Polls[edit]

NOTE: The accuracy of political surveys in Indonesia varies significantly, with some having little transparency. It should also be noted that some agencies also act as political consultants and surveys are often paid for by candidates.[114] Caution should hence be exercised in using the polling data below.

Polls for the 2019 Indonesian legislative election
Pollster Date Sample size PDI-P Golkar Gerindra Demokrat PKB PKS PAN PPP Hanura Nasdem PBB Perindo PSI Berkarya Garuda PKPI
Cyrus 27 March-2 April 2019 1,230 27.9 11.4 16.7 5.5 8.0 5.1 3.7 3.2 1.2 3.7
LSI 18-26 March 2019 1,200 24.6 11.8 13.4 5.9 5.8 3.9 3.1 2.9 0.9 2.5 0.2 3.9 0.2 0.7 0.1 0.1
Charta Politika 1-9 March 2019 2,000 24.8 9.8 15.7 5.1 7.2 4.1 3.2 3.6 0.8 4.9 0.4 1.3 1.4 0.4 0.2 0.3
Kompas 22 February-5 March 2019 2,000 26.9 9.4 17 4.6 6.8 4.5 2.9 2.7 0.9 2.6 0.4 1.5 0.9 0.5 0.2 0.2
LSI 18-25 January 2019 1,200 23.7 11.3 14.6 5.4 8.2 4 1.5 3.5 0.5 4.5 - 3.6 0.4 0.1 0.3 -
Charta Politika 22 December 2018-2 January 2019 2,000 25.2 9.0 15.2 4.5 8.1 4.2 2.6 4.3 0.6 5.3 0.4 2.7 - - - 0.1
Kompas 24 September-5 October 2018 1,200 29.90 6.20 16.00 4.80 6.30 3.30 2.30 3.20 1.00 3.60 0.40 1.50 0.40 0.40 0.30 0.10
Median 19 April–5 May 2018 1,200 26.00 8.80 16.50 8.60 8.70 3.00 3.40 2.80 0.70 2.70 0.20 3.50 0.30 0.20 0.20
Polcomm 3–6 May 2018 1,200 22.92 7.92 17.5 6.17 3.42 2.83 3.25 1.17 0.58 1.75 0.42 1.75 0.33
LSI 28 Apr–5 May 2018 1,200 21.7 15.3 14.7 5.8 6.2 2.2 2.5 1.8 0.7 2.3 0.4 2.3 0.1 0.1 0.3 0.1
Charta Politika 13-19 Apr 2018 2,000 24.9 11 12.3 5 7 3.5 2.8 3.8 0.6 3.6 0.7 4.0 0.2 0.2
Cyrus 27 Mar–3 Apr 2018 1,239 26.9 11.5 11.5 5.0 7.3 3.5 1.5 4.3 1.0 3.3 0.2 4.3 0.3 0.8 0.3
Indikator 25-31 Mar 2018 1,200 27.7 8.0 11.4 6.6 5.8 4.0 1.9 3.5 0.5 2.7 0.3 4.6 0.2 0.3 0.7
Median 24 Mar–6 Apr 2018 1,200 21.1 9.3 15 8.1 8.5 2.9 2 3.6 0.7 2.4
Kompas 21 Mar–1 Apr 2018 1,200 33.3 7.2 10.9 2.8 4.9 2.4 1.3 2.2 2.5 1.5
Poltracking 27 Jan–3 Feb 2018 1,200 26.5 11.3 13.4 6.6 6 4.6 3.6 2.7 2.3 3.3 0.5 2.1 2.1
LSI 7–14 Jan 2018 1,200 22.2 15.5 11.4 6.2 6 3.8 2 3.5 0.7 4.2 0.3 3 0.3
Indikator 17–24 Sep 2017 1,220 23.6 12 10.3 8 5.5 3.3 1.9 4.6 0.9 2 0.5 2.5 0.4
PolMark 9–20 Sep 2017 2,250 25.1 9.2 7.1 5.3 6.3 2.4 3.6 2.4 0.3 2.8 0.2 1.7
SMRC 3–10 Sep 2017 1,220 27.1 11.4 10.2 6.9 5.5 4.4 3.6 4.3 1.3 2.4 0.1 2

NOTE: See warning above

Results[edit]

Presidential[edit]

Overview[edit]

Results of the overseas election showing the candidates with the largest share of votes in 3,174 voting stations across 130 cities around the world, as of 20 May 2019. Data entry 100%. Joko Widodo: red; Prabowo Subianto: blue. Tunisia has a tie condition.

KPU officially announced that the Jokowi-Amin ticket had won the election on 21 May 2019 dawn.[1] The official vote tally was 85,607,362 votes for Jokowi (55.50%) and 68,650,239 votes for Prabowo (44.50%). The result is subject to appeals in the Constitutional Court; parties disputing the official tallies have 72 hours after the announcement to file an appeal.[128]

Prior to the announcement of official results, 40 bodies were authorized by the KPU to release quick count results.[129]

e • d Summary of 17 April 2019 Indonesian presidential election result[130]
Candidate Running mate Parties Votes %
Joko Widodo Ma'ruf Amin Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (Partai Demokrasi Indonesia Perjuangan) 85,607,362 55.50
Prabowo Subianto Sandiaga Uno Great Indonesia Movement Party (Partai Gerakan Indonesia Raya) 68,650,239 44.50
Total 154,257,601 100.00
Valid votes 154,257,601 97.62
Spoilt and null votes 3,754,905 2.38
Turnout 158,012,506 81.93
Abstentions 34,853,748 18.07
Registered voters 192,866,254
Source: KPU

National[edit]

Votes by province[131] Joko Widodo 2014 official portrait.jpg Prabowo.jpg Total votes
Joko Widodo
PDI–P
Prabowo Subianto
Gerindra
Votes % Votes %
Sumatra Aceh 404,188 14.41 2,400,746 85.59 2,804,934
North Sumatra 3,936,515 52.32 3,587,786 47.68 7,524,301
West Sumatra 407,761 14.08 2,488,733 85.91 2,896,494
Riau 1,248,713 38.73 1,975,287 61.27 3,224,000
Jambi 859,833 41.68 1,203,025 58.32 2,062,858
South Sumatra 1,942,987 40.30 2,877,781 59.70 4,820,768
Bengkulu 583,488 49.89 585,999 50.11 1,169,487
Lampung 2,853,585 59.34 1,955,689 40.66 4,809,274
Bangka Belitung Islands 495,729 63.23 288,235 36.77 783,964
Riau Islands 550,692 54.19 465,511 45.81 1,016,203
Java Banten 2,537,524 38.46 4,059,514 61.54 6,597,038
Jakarta 3,279,547 51.68 3,066,137 48.32 6,345,684
West Java 10,750,568 40.07 16,077,446 59.93 26,828,014
Central Java 16,825,511 77.29 4,944,447 22.71 21,769,958
Yogyakarta 1,655,174 69.03 742,481 30.97 2,397,655
East Java 16,231,668 65.79 8,441,247 34.21 24,672,915
Kalimantan West Kalimantan 1,709,896 57.50 1,263,757 42.50 2,973,653
Central Kalimantan 830,948 60.74 537,138 39.26 1,368,086
South Kalimantan 823,939 35.92 1,470,163 64.08 2,294,102
East Kalimantan 1,094,845 55.71 870,443 44.29 1,965,288
North Kalimantan 248,239 70.04 106,162 29.96 354,401
Lesser Sunda Bali 2,351,057 91.68 213,415 9.32 2,564,472
West Nusa Tenggara 951,242 32.11 2,011,319 67.89 2,962,561
East Nusa Tenggara 2,368,982 88.57 305,587 14.43 2,674,569
Sulawesi North Sulawesi 1,220,524 77.24 359,685 22.76 1,580,209
Gorontalo 369,803 51.73 345,129 48.27 714,932
Central Sulawesi 914,588 56.41 706,654 43.59 1,621,242
Southeast Sulawesi 555,664 39.75 842,117 60.25 1,397,781
West Sulawesi 475,312 64.32 263,620 35.68 738,932
South Sulawesi 2,117,591 42.98 2,809,393 57.02 4,926,984
Maluku Maluku 599,457 60.40 392,940 39.60 992,397
North Maluku 310,548 47.39 344,823 52.61 655,371
Papua Papua 3,021,713 90.66 311,352 9.34 3,333,065
West Papua 508,997 79.81 128,732 20.19 637,729
At-large 85,607,362 55.50 68,650,239 44.50 154,257,601
Unofficial quick count results for the 2019 Indonesian presidential election
Polling organization Jokowi Prabowo Data received Source
Litbang Kompas 54.43 45.57 99.95% [132]
Indo Barometer 54.32 45.68 99.67% [132]
Charta Politika 54.31 45.69 99.45% [132]
Poltracking 54.95 45.05 99.89% [132]
Indikator 53.91 46.09 95.70% [132]
LSI 55.77 44.23 99.55% [133]
CSIS-Cyrus 55.59 44.41 98.15% [134]

Rejection[edit]

Protesters marching for the rejection of the results.
Marines preparing for the 2019 Indonesian elections protests.

Prabowo's camp has declared that they would not accept the KPU's official results. On 14 May 2019, he held a press briefing where he alleged that vote-rigging had occurred, and claimed that his campaign team had collected evidence showing so. The campaign team had also requested KPU stop their official vote tallying.[135] Shortly after the election, after unofficial quick count results indicated a Jokowi victory, Prabowo claimed that his internal counts had found him winning with 62 percent of the votes, and accused the pollsters of taking sides.[136] One of the campaign team members, Fadli Zon, has indicated that the campaign team would not bring the case to the Constitutional Court (which rejected their appeal in 2014).[137] After KPU's official announcement on 21 May, Prabowo stated that he rejected the presidential election results, and would resort to "constitutional legal pathways".[138]

Protests by Prabowo supporters are expected on 22 May, when KPU is set to officially announce the results. In anticipation, the American and Singaporean Embassies issued security notices warning their citizens to avoid the protests.[139][140] Following arrests of 29 people suspected of planning attacks on the rally, the Indonesian National Police urged for people to not attend the protests.[141] Several opposition figures, such as Kivlan Zen, were investigated on suspicions of treason.[142]

Legislative[edit]

The official tally puts the PDI-P in the first place with 19.33%, followed by Prabowo's Gerindra with 12.57%. The next top parties by the number of votes are Golkar, the National Awakening Party (PKB), the Nasdem Party, and the Prosperous Justice Party (PKS).[143][144]

e • d Summary of the 17 April 2019 Indonesian People's Representative Council election results
Parties Votes % Swing Seats +/- %
Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (Partai Demokrasi Indonesia Perjuangan, PDI–P) 27,053,961 19.33 Increase 0.38 128 Increase 19 22.26
Great Indonesia Movement Party (Partai Gerakan Indonesia Raya, Gerindra) 17,594,839 12.57 Increase 0.76 78 Increase 5 13.57
Golkar (Partai Golongan Karya) 17,229,789 12.31 Decrease 2.44 85 Decrease 6 14.78
National Awakening Party (Partai Kebangkitan Bangsa, PKB) 13,570,097 9.69 Increase 0.65 58 Increase 11 10.09
Nasdem Party (Partai Nasdem, Nasdem) 12,661,792 9.05 Increase 2.33 59 Increase 23 10.26
Prosperous Justice Party (Partai Keadilan Sejahtera, PKS) 11,493,663 8.21 Increase 1.42 50 Increase 10 8.70
Democratic Party (Partai Demokrat, PD) 10,876,507 7.77 Decrease 2.42 54 Decrease 7 9.39
National Mandate Party (Partai Amanat Nasional, PAN) 9,572,623 6.84 Decrease 0.75 44 Decrease 4 7.65
United Development Party (Partai Persatuan Pembangunan, PPP) 6,323,147 4.52 Decrease 2.01 19 Decrease 20 3.30
Perindo Party (Partai Perindo, Perindo) 3,738,320 2.67 New 0 New 0.00
Berkarya Party (Partai Berkarya, Berkarya) 2,929,495 2.09 New 0 New 0.00
Indonesian Solidarity Party (Partai Solidaritas Indonesia, PSI) 2,650,361 1.89 New 0 New 0.00
People's Conscience Party (Partai Hati Nurani Rakyat, Hanura) 2,161,507 1.54 Decrease 3.72 0 Decrease 16 0.00
Crescent Star Party (Partai Bulan Bintang, PBB) 1,099,848 0.79 Decrease 0.67 0 Steady 0.00
Garuda Party (Partai Garuda, Garuda) 702,536 0.50 New 0 New 0.00
Indonesian Justice and Unity Party (Partai Keadilan dan Persatuan Indonesia, PKPI) 312,775 0.22 Decrease 0.69 0 Steady 0.00
Total 100.00 Steady 575 Increase 15 100.00
Spoilt and null votes
Voter turnout
Electorate
Source: KPU RI
Unofficial quick count results for the 2019 Indonesian legislative election
Polling organization PKB Gerindra PDI-P Golkar Nasdem Garuda Berkarya PKS Perindo PPP PSI PAN Hanura PD PBB PKPI Data received Source
Litbang Kompas 9.27 12.87 19.89 11.86 8.23 0.53 2.12 8.67 2.84 4.62 2.06 6.67 1.34 8.05 0.76 0.23 93.9% [145]
LSI 9.71 12.52 19.69 12.19 8.61 0.98 2.41 8.04 2.95 4.34 2.37 6.15 1.89 6.83 0.93 0.39 99.55% [145]
Indo Barometer 8.97 13.37 19.49 11.64 7.84 0.57 2.12 9.66 2.67 4.40 2.07 6.83 1.64 7.63 0.84 0.27 91.58% [145]
Indikator 10.05 12.88 19.11 11.88 9.00 0.50 2.06 8.42 2.66 4.46 1.99 6.55 1.63 7.64 0.93 0.25 88.71% [146]
Poltracking 10.42 12.71 19.21 12.64 8.50 0.62 2.17 7.83 2.78 4.48 1.82 6.32 1.64 7.69 0.86 0.31 N/A [147]
SMRC 9.57 12.59 19.42 12.14 8.95 0.63 2.19 8.12 2.80 4.48 1.94 6.65 1.71 7.55 0.87 0.31 N/A [147]

Turnout[edit]

The voter turnout for the election was a record, with around 81 percent of the registered voters participating in the presidential election. This was the highest turnout in Indonesian presidential electoral history, in contrast to the trend of increasing number of abstentions between 2004 and 2014.[148] Certain areas in West Papua also allowed traditional voting procedures where a single village head represented entire communities, resulting in nominal 100 percent turnouts.[149]

Controversies[edit]

A woman (wearing white hijab) supervising the election process. The woman is a witness from the PKS party. Witnesses from other parties can be seen behind the woman.

The decision to hold the legislative and presidential elections simultaneously was criticized by observers as it was deemed too complicated—manual tabulation of votes at polling stations lasted until the day after the election itself.[150] Exhaustion and fatigue caused by the long hours resulted in at least 225 election officers dying during the voting or in the ensuing vote counts, in addition to 1,470 falling ill.[151] Vice President Jusuf Kalla has called for the 2024 election to return to the 2014 format of separated legislative and presidential votes.[152] The 2024 election, under the existing regulations, would be a vote on all elected legislative and executive posts in the country.[153]

As of May 9, 2019, the election commission (KPU) confirmed that 569 deaths had occurred due to overwork; this number includes 456 election officers, 91 supervisory agents and 22 police officers. Besides, 4,310 had reportedly fallen sick.[154]

In July 2018, the KPU passed a regulation barring ex-corruption convicts, sexual offenders and people convicted of drug offenses from running for office.[155] However, the Elections Supervisory Body and the People's Representative Council objected to the regulation, and accused the KPU of violating the 2017 election law.[156] The Supreme Court of Indonesia eventually ruled that the KPU regulation was invalid, allowing the aforementioned convicts to contest in the election.[157] 38 people who had been corruption convicts eventually ran for office across the country - 26 for regency/municipal councils and 12 for provincial councils.[158]

The KPU was also criticized for giving legislative candidates an option to not publish their resumes - Formappi found that around a quarter of the candidates chose to not publish their information, with a further 18 percent not having submitted any. Some candidates noted that they wished to publish their information, but could not due to technical reasons with the KPU's website.[119][159]

Ballot boxes for the election were made from waterproof cardboard intended for single use, a move the KPU said would save on the ballot box costs and allow construction of transparent boxes as mandated by election regulations.[160] Although the decision was approved by all parties in DPR, Prabowo's campaign team contested it.[161] Uno remarked that there was a potential for cheating.[162] PDI-P Secretary General Hasto Kristiyanto remarked that "Gerindra was making up reasons for losing".[163] The KPU later held public demonstrations where a ballot box was sprayed with water and sat on to demonstrate its strength,[164] although KPU officials from various region had reported receiving 70 ballot boxes with water damage,[165][166][167] and even the cardboard ballot boxes eaten by termites.[168][169]

In January 2019, it was rumored by Yusril Ihza Mahendra that Jokowi was considering releasing Islamist Abu Bakar Ba'asyir due to old age and declining health. The move was seen as controversial in Indonesia as part of a growing number of actions taken by Jokowi to appease Indonesia's conservative Muslims ahead of the election.[170] The government later suspended this attempt as Ba'asyir refused to accept Pancasila as his ideology, instead stuck to his fundamentalist Islam point of view.[171]

Throughout his campaign, Prabowo was accused of spreading pessimism and using Donald Trump's 2016 campaign strategy of highlighting economic disparity.[172] In one speech in October 2018, Prabowo stated he wanted to "Make Indonesia Great Again", much like Trump's 2016 campaign slogan.[173][174] He also accused journalists of "manipulating" the attendance of the 212 "Mujahideen" Grand Reunion on 2 December 2018.[175][176] Prabowo is known to have close relations with fundamentalist Muslims,[177] with Muhammad Rizieq Shihab of the Islamic Defenders Front being one prominent example. Rizieq, who is currently on self-imposed exile in Mecca, persistently campaigned against Jokowi and for Prabowo.[178] Prabowo also promised to bring Rizieq home should he be elected.[179]

Budget[edit]

A budget of Rp 24.9 trillion (USD 1.7 billion) was allocated for the election - 3 percent higher than the budget used in the 2014 election. This included spending on "safeguarding the election from hijacking".[180] The KPU estimated a Rp 16.8 trillion funding requirement in December 2017,[181] later revising it to Rp 15 trillion for a one-stage election,[182] and ended up submitting a funding request of Rp 18.1 trillion, on top of the Rp 8.6 trillion requested by Bawaslu, in September 2018.[183] Officers at the polling stations are paid Rp 500,000 (roughly USD 35) each.[184]

Gallery[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Except for voters in Jakarta, who did not vote for the regency/municipal council and only received four ballot papers[21] and overseas voters who only voted for the president/vice president and DPR.[22]
  2. ^ Ballot numbers 15 to 18 are assigned to local parties in the province of Aceh[53]
  3. ^ Though part of Prabowo's coalition, the Democratic Party explicitly permits its members to endorse either pair of candidates.[78]
  4. ^ Due to the formation of North Kalimantan, which was previously unrepresented[116]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Zunita Putri (21 May 2019). "KPU Tetapkan Jokowi-Ma'ruf Pemenang Pilpres 2019". Detik.com (in Indonesian). Retrieved 21 May 2019.
  2. ^ Zunita Putri (21 May 2019). "KPU Tetapkan Hasil Pileg 2019: PDIP Juara, Disusul Gerindra-Golkar". Detik.com (in Indonesian). Retrieved 21 May 2019.
  3. ^ Ben Bland (3 April 2019). "The mind-boggling challenge of Indonesia's election logistics". The Interpreter. Archived from the original on 11 April 2019. Retrieved 11 April 2019.
  4. ^ "Old age, poor health caused deaths of poll administrators: Indonesia government". The Straits Times. 12 May 2019. Retrieved 14 May 2019.
  5. ^ Beo Da Costa, Agustinus (9 May 2019). "Indonesia should probe deaths of election staff - parliament deputy". Reuters. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  6. ^ "Six dead, 200 injured in Jakarta riots". The Star Online. 22 May 2019. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  7. ^ Karina M. Tehusijarana (8 February 2019). "Explaining the 2019 simultaneous elections". The Jakarta Post. Retrieved 29 April 2019.
  8. ^ "Indonesia to ensure stability during elections, says president's..." Reuters. 12 April 2018. Retrieved 29 April 2019.
  9. ^ "Jokowi vs. Prabowo: Who Will Win in 2019?". Jakarta Globe. Archived from the original on 17 February 2018. Retrieved 24 September 2018.
  10. ^ Chandran, Nyshka (18 October 2016). "Two years on, Indonesian President Jokowi is just getting started". CNBC. Archived from the original on 25 August 2018. Retrieved 24 September 2018.
  11. ^ "Indonesian opposition party leads parliamentary poll". BBC. 10 April 2014. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  12. ^ "House to not apply e-voting in 2019 elections". The Jakarta Post. 30 March 2017. Archived from the original on 12 May 2017. Retrieved 3 May 2017.
  13. ^ "RUU Pemilu: Pemilu Serentak Legislatif dan Presiden Bulan April 2019". Komisi Pemilihan Umum Republik Indonesia. KPU. Archived from the original on 15 June 2017. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  14. ^ Anugrah (25 April 2017). "Pemilu 2019: Rabu 17 April 2019". Harian Terbit. Archived from the original on 4 July 2017. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  15. ^ Rommy Roosyana (11 May 2019). "Pelantikan presiden hasil Pemilu 2019 digelar Oktober". Beritagar.id (in Indonesian). Retrieved 12 May 2019.
  16. ^ "Inilah Undang-Undang Nomor 7 Tahun 2017 tentang Pemilihan Umum (2)". setkab.go.id (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 2018-12-04. Retrieved 22 September 2018.
  17. ^ a b c d e f "Indonesian Electoral Law of 2017". Act No. 7 of 2017 (PDF) (in Indonesian). Archived from the original (PDF) on 28 August 2018. Retrieved 24 September 2018.
  18. ^ Budhiati, Ida (14 May 2017). "Rekonstruksi Kelembagaan KPU". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  19. ^ "Tugas, Wewenang, dan Kewajiban". bawaslu.go.id (in Indonesian). Bawaslu. Archived from the original on 5 December 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  20. ^ Stefanie, Christie (12 June 2017). "Jokowi Lantik Anggota Dewan Kehormatan Penyelenggara Pemilu". CNN Indonesia (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 19 December 2018. Retrieved 18 December 2018.
  21. ^ Alpino, Okto Rizki (7 April 2019). "Khusus DKI, Pemilih Hanya Dapat Empat Surat Suara di Pemilu 2019". SINDOnews.com (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  22. ^ Ronauli, Margareth (12 April 2019). "Ini Tata Cara Pemilu 2019 di Luar Negeri". tagar.id (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  23. ^ "Jusuf Kalla: 2019 Elections Most Complicated in World". Tempo. 25 June 2018. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 22 September 2018.
  24. ^ Tanamal, Yvette (22 August 2018). "Why Indonesians Use Nails Instead of Pens When Voting". Vice. Archived from the original on 5 December 2018. Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  25. ^ a b "Indonesians Vote in Vast Democratic Exercise". The New York Times. 17 April 2019. Retrieved 22 April 2019.
  26. ^ "Rekapitulasi Surat Suara Pemilu Dilakukan secara Manual". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). 1 March 2019. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  27. ^ "KPU: Hasil Resmi Pemilu 2019 Diumumkan Paling Lama 35 Hari". Berita Satu (in Indonesian). 17 April 2019. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  28. ^ "Inilah Undang-Undang Nomor 7 Tahun 2017 tentang Pemilihan Umum (2)". setkab.go.id (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 2018-12-04. Retrieved 22 September 2018.
  29. ^ "Parpol tak Usung Capres Belum Tentu Kena Sanksi". JPNN (in Indonesian). 5 August 2018. Archived from the original on 5 December 2018. Retrieved 15 October 2018.
  30. ^ a b c Amindoni, Ayomi (21 July 2017). "Apa yang perlu Anda ketahui tentang UU Pemilu". BBC (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  31. ^ Tehusijarana, Karina M. (28 May 2018). "New votes-to-seats system makes elections 'fairer'". The Jakarta Post. Archived from the original on 28 May 2018. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  32. ^ "Ketua DPR Minta Parpol Penuhi Kuota Caleg Perempuan di Pemilu 2019". liputan6.com (in Indonesian). 14 April 2018. Archived from the original on 5 December 2018. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  33. ^ Dwi Andayani (14 August 2018). "Suara Parpol Tak Lolos Parlemen akan Hangus, Begini Aturannya". Detik.com (in Indonesian). Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  34. ^ "Pemilu 2019: Inilah Jumlah Dapil dan Kursi di Dewan". JPNN (in Indonesian). 18 April 2018. Retrieved 23 May 2019.
  35. ^ "Minus OSO, 807 Orang Berebut Kursi DPD RI". Detik.com (in Indonesian). 20 September 2018. Archived from the original on 23 September 2018. Retrieved 24 September 2018.
  36. ^ Amindoni, Ayumi (21 July 2017). "Apa yang perlu Anda ketahui tentang UU Pemilu". BBC (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 16 October 2018.
  37. ^ Andayani, Dwi (24 April 2018). "Ini Jadwal Pemilu 2019 Bagi WNI di Luar Negeri". Detik.com (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  38. ^ Irfan, Muhammad (6 September 2018). "Daftar Pemilih Tetap Nasional Ditetapkan, Tapi Masih Terbuka Perbaikan". Pikiran Rakyat (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 15 October 2018.
  39. ^ "Setelah Putusan MK, Jumlah TPS Pemilu 2019 Bertambah 829 Jadi 810.329". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). 8 April 2019. Retrieved 22 April 2019.
  40. ^ "Widodo glides to a second term in Indonesia". Asia Times. 17 April 2019. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  41. ^ "187m voters to woo as poll season begins in Indonesia". The Straits Times. 19 September 2018. Archived from the original on 19 September 2018. Retrieved 16 October 2018.
  42. ^ Prastiwi, Devira (22 October 2018). "Bawaslu Papua Temukan Jutaan Pemilih Ganda Pemilu 2019". liputan6.com (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 22 October 2018. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  43. ^ Farisa, Fitria Chusna (12 September 2018). "Bawaslu Prediksi Jumlah Pemilih Ganda Pemilu 2019 Capai 2 Juta". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  44. ^ "Political parties dispute voters list". The Jakarta Post. 4 September 2018. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 16 October 2018.
  45. ^ "KPU: Jumlah Pemilih Tetap Pemilu 2019 Capai 192 Juta". CNN Indonesia (in Indonesian). 15 December 2018. Archived from the original on 18 December 2018. Retrieved 17 December 2018.
  46. ^ Farisa, Fitria Chusna (18 April 2019). "KPU Gelar Pemungutan Suara Susulan di 2.249 TPS". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). Retrieved 22 April 2019.
  47. ^ Asmara, Chandra Gian (17 April 2019). "Pemilu Malaysia Diulang, di Sydney Buka Susulan". CNBC Indonesia (in Indonesian). Retrieved 22 April 2019.
  48. ^ Andayani, Dwi (17 October 2017). "Resmi Ditutup KPU, 27 Parpol Daftar sebagai Peserta Pemilu 2019". detiknews (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  49. ^ "Four new parties to take part in 2019 elections". The Jakarta Post. 17 February 2018. Archived from the original on 23 March 2018. Retrieved 16 March 2018.
  50. ^ "Bawaslu finds Crescent Star Party eligible for 2019 elections". The Jakarta Post. 5 March 2018. Archived from the original on 16 March 2018. Retrieved 16 March 2018.
  51. ^ Putranto, Aryo (11 April 2018). "Diloloskan Pemilu oleh PTUN, PKPI Langsung Gelar Rakernas". CNN Indonesia (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 11 April 2018. Retrieved 11 April 2018.
  52. ^ "Ada 16 Parpol Nasional Peserta Pemilu 2019, Tahu Apa Saja?". Kumparan (in Indonesian). 13 April 2018. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  53. ^ "KPU Beri PBB Nomor Urut 19 untuk Pemilu 2019". CNN Indonesia (in Indonesian). 6 March 2018. Archived from the original on 12 April 2018. Retrieved 12 April 2018.
  54. ^ Suryowati, Estu (19 February 2018). "Ini Nomor Urut Empat Partai Lokal Aceh di Pemilu 2019". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 10 May 2018. Retrieved 9 May 2018.
  55. ^ Aritonang, Margareth S. (21 July 2017). "Election bill passed, presidential threshold intact". The Jakarta Post. Archived from the original on 22 July 2017. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  56. ^ Saragih, Samgysara (23 May 2018). "KPU: WNI Naturalisasi Boleh Jadi Capres atau Cawapres". Kabar24 (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  57. ^ Putri, Teatrika Handiko (9 August 2018). "Pilpres 2019: PAN Akhirnya Resmi Dukung Prabowo". IDN Times (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 22 September 2018.
  58. ^ Ibnu Sani, Ahmad Faiz (7 May 2018). "Ini yang Dibahas Pramono dengan 9 Sekjen Partai Pendukung Jokowi". Tempo (in Indonesian). Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  59. ^ Kuwado, Fabian Januarius; Farisa, Fitria Chusna (9 August 2018). "Kubu Jokowi Bernama Koalisi Indonesia Kerja". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  60. ^ Chairunnisa, Ninis (10 August 2018). "PPP: Koalisi Jokowi Sudah Final, Tak Bertambah atau Berkurang". Tempo (in Indonesian). Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  61. ^ Putri, Teatrika Handiko (9 August 2018). "Pilpres 2019: PAN Akhirnya Resmi Dukung Prabowo". IDN Times (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 22 September 2018.
  62. ^ "PKS Resmi Dukung Prabowo Capres di 2019". Kumparan (in Indonesian). 9 August 2018. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 22 September 2018.
  63. ^ Kurniawan, Sigid (10 August 2018). "Demokrat Putuskan Dukung Prabowo-Sandiaga". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 22 September 2018.
  64. ^ "Berkarya Dukung Prabowo-Sandiaga, Titiek Hadir ke KPU". Tribunnews.com (in Indonesian). 10 August 2018. Archived from the original on 13 August 2018. Retrieved 22 September 2018.
  65. ^ "Prabowo Coalition to Finalize VP Candidate Name Tonight". Tempo. 8 August 2018. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2018.
  66. ^ Putri, Adinda (14 August 2018). "Asman Abnur Quits Jokowi Cabinet as PAN Joins Prabowo Camp". Jakarta Globe. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2018.
  67. ^ Ihsanuddin (19 September 2018). "Ini Alasan Prabowo-Sandi Pilih Nama "Koalisi Indonesia Adil Makmur"". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2018.
  68. ^ Evans, Kevin. "Guide to the 2019 Indonesia Elections" (PDF). Australia Indonesia Center. Archived (PDF) from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2018.
  69. ^ Wiwoho, Bimo (14 August 2018). "Abstain di Pilpres, Garuda Fokus Dulang Suara di Pileg 2019". CNN Indonesia (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 22 September 2018.
  70. ^ Ihsanuddin (10 August 2018). "Tak Diajak Jokowi dan Prabowo, PBB Netral di Pilpres 2019". Kompas.com (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 22 September 2018.
  71. ^ "Jokowi Lauds Yusril Ihza Mahendra as a Professional Individual". Tempo. 6 November 2018. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  72. ^ Abba Gabrillin (27 January 2019). "Hasil Rakornas, PBB Resmi Dukung Jokowi-Ma'ruf Amin". Kompas.com (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 27 January 2019. Retrieved 27 January 2019.
  73. ^ "Irwandi's Nanggroe Aceh Party declares support for Jokowi in 2019 race". The Jakarta Post. 22 January 2019. Archived from the original on 25 January 2019. Retrieved 24 January 2019.
  74. ^ "Pendaftaran Capres-Cawapres 2019 Resmi Dibuka". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). 4 August 2018. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 22 September 2018.
  75. ^ Prasetia, Andhika (10 August 2018). "Drama Jokowi Deklarasi Cawapres dan Show Off Prabowo Daftar Pilpres". detiknews (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 12 August 2018. Retrieved 15 October 2018.
  76. ^ "Drama Penunjukan Sandiaga Uno Jadi Cawapres Prabowo". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). 10 August 2018. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 15 October 2018.
  77. ^ Kristian Erdianto; Dylan Aprialdo Rachman (9 August 2018). "Jadi Cawapres Prabowo, Sandiaga Keluar dari Gerindra" [Becomes Prabowo's Running Mate, Sandiaga Exits Gerindra]. Kompas.com (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 21 January 2019. Retrieved 21 January 2019. ...Prabowo mengaku meminta Sandiaga untuk mundur sebagai kader Gerindra agar bisa diterima oleh dua parpol lain... [...Prabowo claimed to ask Sandiaga to renounce as Gerindra cadre in order to be accepted by two other parties...]
  78. ^ "AHY: Kader Demokrat Bebas Tentukan Sikap pada Pilpres 2019". Kompas.com (in Indonesian). 10 September 2018. Archived from the original on 25 January 2019. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  79. ^ "Son of former Indonesian president launches think-tank in Jakarta". The Straits Times. 11 August 2017. Archived from the original on 23 June 2018. Retrieved 22 September 2018.
  80. ^ Ihsanuddin (10 August 2018). "AHY: Saya Dukung Penuh Prabowo-Sandi". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2018.
  81. ^ Jordan, Ray (1 July 2018). "Cerita Amien Rais: Teken Capres PA 212, Dicapreskan Koalisi Ummat". detiknews (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 23 January 2019. Retrieved 22 September 2018.
  82. ^ Putra, Putu Merta Surya (8 July 2018). "Prabowo: TGB Dukung Jokowi, Kita Punya Amien Rais". liputan6.com (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2018.
  83. ^ "Anies Baswedan Mengaku Didatangi Massa yang Memintanya Jadi Capres". liputan6.com (in Indonesian). 24 July 2018. Archived from the original on 24 August 2018. Retrieved 22 September 2018.
  84. ^ Fathurohman, Irfan (17 December 2018). "Hadiri Konferensi Nasional Gerindra, Anies Dukung Prabowo-Sandiaga". IDN Times (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 19 December 2018. Retrieved 19 December 2018.
  85. ^ Ibrahim, Gibran Maulana (28 June 2018). "Demokrat: JK Harus Berani Maju Capres". detiknews (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 7 October 2018.
  86. ^ Florentin, Vindry (3 August 2018). "Dukung Jokowi di Pilpres 2019, JK: Masa Teman Tak Didukung". Tempo (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2018.
  87. ^ a b "Prabowo to Set Up Anti-hoax Team During Election Campaign". Tempo. 23 September 2018. Archived from the original on 23 September 2018. Retrieved 16 October 2018.
  88. ^ Yulisman, Linda (8 September 2018). "Media tycoon to helm Jokowi's campaign team". The Straits Times. Archived from the original on 8 September 2018. Retrieved 16 October 2018.
  89. ^ Mashabi, Sania (14 September 2018). "PAN usul debat berbahasa Inggris, Gerindra pertimbangkan pakai bahasa yang mudah". Merdeka (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 14 September 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  90. ^ "Lima Sesi Debat Jokowi dan Prabowo Digelar 2019". CNN Indonesia (in Indonesian). 26 September 2018. Archived from the original on 5 December 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  91. ^ Saputra, Muhammad Genantan (7 January 2019). "Kubu Prabowo Kritik Bocoran Pertanyaan Debat: KPU Melecehkan Paslon". Merdeka (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 19 January 2019. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  92. ^ "Moderator Ira Koesno hopes for fierce presidential debate despite 'cheat sheet'". The Jakarta Post. 11 January 2019. Archived from the original on 19 January 2019. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  93. ^ Sapiie, Marguerite Afra; Ramadhani, Nurul Fitri (17 January 2019). "Jokowi to continue legal reform, Prabowo promises higher wages for law enforcers". The Jakarta Post. Archived from the original on 19 January 2019. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  94. ^ "Sosok Moderator Debat ke-2 Pilpres 2019, Tommy Tjokro dan Anisha Dasuki". Tribun Wow (in Indonesian). 25 January 2019. Archived from the original on 2019-01-30. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  95. ^ Renaldi, Erwin; Shelton, Tracey (18 February 2019). "Unicorns become an unexpected symbol of Indonesia's second presidential debate". ABC News. Retrieved 25 February 2019.
  96. ^ Sapiie, Marguerite Afra (21 February 2019). "Presidential campaign heats up as rival camps trade blows". The Jakarta Post. Archived from the original on 25 February 2019. Retrieved 25 February 2019.
  97. ^ Andayani, Dwi (17 February 2019). "Prabowo Akui Kuasai Ratusan Ribu Hektare Lahan di Kaltim dan Aceh". detiknews (in Indonesian). Retrieved 23 April 2019.
  98. ^ "Jokowi Knocks Prabowo on His Extensive Land Ownership During Second Presidential Debate". Jakarta Globe. 17 February 2019. Retrieved 22 April 2019.
  99. ^ "Jadwal Debat Pilpres 2019 Ketiga, Ma'ruf Amin vs Sandiaga Uno". tirto.id (in Indonesian). 18 February 2019. Archived from the original on 26 February 2019. Retrieved 25 February 2019.
  100. ^ Aditya, Ars; Sipatuhar, Tassia; Singgih, Viriya; Rahadiana, Rieka (30 March 2019). "Jokowi, Prabowo Spar Over Defense Policy as Indonesia Vote Nears". Bloomberg. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  101. ^ Adyatama, Egi (13 April 2019). "Presidential Debate; Prabowo Asks Jokowi to Learn from China". Tempo. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  102. ^ Yuniar, Resti Woro (5 October 2018). "Rupiah, race: where Indonesian election will be won or lost". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 6 October 2018. Retrieved 15 October 2018.
  103. ^ Walden, Max (21 September 2018). "Indonesian Opposition Movement Accuses President of Authoritarianism". VOA. Archived from the original on 22 September 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  104. ^ "Beware of hoaxes, fake news ahead of 2019 election". The Jakarta Post. 21 September 2018. Archived from the original on 21 September 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2018.
  105. ^ Walden, Max (25 October 2018). "Ahead of 2019 Election, Indonesia, Media Battle Fake News". VOA. Archived from the original on 7 November 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2018.
  106. ^ Yuniar, Resty Woro (14 October 2018). "The face of fake news: Indonesia's latest disinformation scandal". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 3 November 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2018.
  107. ^ Putri, Zunita (13 August 2018). "Tangkal Hoax, Timses Jokowi Bentuk Tim Siber Hadapi Isu di Medsos". detiknews (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 29 March 2019. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  108. ^ Handley, Lucy (27 September 2018). "Indonesia's government is to hold public fake news briefings every week". CNBC. Archived from the original on 28 September 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  109. ^ Lamb, Kate (18 January 2019). "Vote 'Dildo for Indonesia': rivals for president find young voters hard to please". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 18 January 2019. Retrieved 18 January 2019.
  110. ^ Anugerah, Pijar (24 September 2018). "Dana awal kampanye kubu Jokowi Rp11 miliar dan Prabowo Rp2 miliar dianggap 'tidak realistis'". BBC Indonesia (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 5 December 2018. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  111. ^ Salna, Karlis (26 March 2019). "Rising Star in Indonesia Bets $100 Million on Ousting Incumbent President". Bloomberg. Retrieved 22 April 2019.
  112. ^ "Indonesia's Jokowi Still Looks Good for 2019, Polls Say". Asia Sentinel. 24 July 2018. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2018.
  113. ^ "Jokowi may run unopposed in next polls". The Straits Times. 9 May 2018. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 2 November 2018.
  114. ^ a b Hidayat, Reja (25 April 2018). "Rawan Kepentingan: Campur Aduk Lembaga Survei & Jasa Konsultan". tirto.id (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 22 September 2018.
  115. ^ "Pemilu 2019, Jumlah Kursi Anggota DPRD Berjumlah 19.817". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). 18 April 2018. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  116. ^ "MK Putuskan Kaltara Tak Punya Wakil di DPD 2014-2019". Berita Satu (in Indonesian). 10 October 2017. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  117. ^ "Syarat Lengkap Jadi Caleg di 2019: Bukan Koruptor hingga Lulusan SMA". Kumparan (in Indonesian). 1 July 2018. Archived from the original on 5 December 2018. Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  118. ^ "KPU Tetapkan Daftar Caleg 2019, PKB-NasDem-PAN Terbanyak". detiknews (in Indonesian). 20 September 2018. Archived from the original on 9 October 2018. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  119. ^ a b Briantika, Adi (15 September 2018). "Formappi Sebut 94 Persen Petahana Calonkan Diri di Pileg 2019". tirto.id. Archived from the original on 5 December 2018. Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  120. ^ "Minus OSO, 807 Orang Berebut Kursi DPD RI". detiknews (in Indonesian). 20 September 2018. Archived from the original on 23 September 2018. Retrieved 24 September 2018.
  121. ^ "Oesman Sapta Akhirnya Masuk DCT Pileg 2019 dengan Sejumlah Kontroversi". Bisnis Indonesia (in Indonesian). 30 November 2018. Archived from the original on 6 December 2018. Retrieved 6 December 2018.
  122. ^ Pollard, Ruth (17 April 2019). "Voting Begins in Indonesia Presidential, Legislative Elections". Bloomberg. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  123. ^ Sarasa, Agung Bakti (21 September 2018). "KPU Tetapkan DCT Caleg DPRD Jabar 1.586 Orang". SINDOnews.com (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 5 December 2018. Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  124. ^ Farisa, Fitria Chusna (20 September 2018). "KPU Tetapkan 7968 Caleg DPR RI". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 8 April 2019. Retrieved 8 April 2019.
  125. ^ "Ini Daftar Dana Awal Kampanye Sejumlah Parpol Peserta Pemilu 2019". detiknews (in Indonesian). 24 September 2018. Retrieved 22 April 2019.
  126. ^ Gabrilin, Abba (29 August 2017). "Naik 10 Kali Lipat, Berapa Dana yang Akan Diterima Setiap Parpol?". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). Retrieved 22 April 2019.
  127. ^ Hadi, Syaiful (3 January 2019). "Rincian Sumbangan Dana Kampanye Pilpres dan Partai Pemilu 2019". Tempo. Retrieved 22 April 2019.
  128. ^ Prasongko, Dias (20 May 2019). "KPU Menetapkan Jokowi-Ma'ruf Unggul 55.50 Persen". Tempo (in Indonesian). Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  129. ^ "Daftar 40 Lembaga Survei yang Boleh Umumkan Quick Count Pemilu 2019". liputan6.com (in Indonesian). 16 April 2019. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  130. ^ Ghina Ghaliya (21 May 2019). "KPU names Jokowi winner of election". The Jakarta Post. Retrieved 21 May 2019.
  131. ^ "Ini Hasil Lengkap Rekapitulasi Suara Pilpres 2019 di 34 Provinsi". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). 21 May 2019. Retrieved 23 May 2019.
  132. ^ a b c d e Retia Kartika Dewi; Akbar Bhayu Tamtomo (18 April 2019). "INFOGRAFIK: Ini Hasil "Quick Count" Pilpres 2019 Versi 5 Lembaga". Kompas.com (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 18 April 2019. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  133. ^ Azis, Ibnu; Firdaus, Fitra (18 April 2019). "Hasil Quick Count LSI: Jokowi 55%, Prabowo 44%, Data Masuk 99%". tirto.id (in Indonesian). Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  134. ^ Ramadhan, Ardito (19 April 2019). "Hasil "Quick Count" Sejumlah Lembaga: Jokowi-Ma'ruf Unggul di DKI Jakarta". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  135. ^ "Indonesia elections: Prabowo alleges fraud, says he will reject official vote tally". Straits Times. 15 May 2019. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  136. ^ Made Anthony Iswara; Nurul Fitri Ramadhani (17 April 2019). "Prabowo claims election lead, accuses pollsters of being 'partisan'". The Jakarta Post. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  137. ^ Ramadhani, Nurul Fitri; Ghaliya, Ghina (15 May 2019). "Election dispute settlement in Constitutional Court 'useless': Prabowo camp". The Jakarta Post. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  138. ^ "KPU umumkan hasil Pilpres 2019: Apa kata Joko Widodo dan Prabowo Subianto?". BBC Indonesia (in Indonesian). 21 May 2019. Retrieved 21 May 2019.
  139. ^ "Singaporeans Warned to Avoid Election Protests in Jakarta". Jakarta Globe. 18 May 2019. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  140. ^ "U.S. embassy issues Indonesia security alert ahead of election results". Reuters. 18 May 2019. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  141. ^ Aditya, Arys; Salna, Karlis (17 May 2019). "Indonesia Arrests 29 Suspects for Plotting Attacks on Political Rallies". Bloomberg. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  142. ^ "Kivlan Zen dan Eggi Sudjana Dikenai Tuduhan Makar". VOA Indonesia (in Indonesian). 13 May 2019. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  143. ^ Wijanarko, Tulus (2019-05-21). "KPU Tetapkan Hasil Rekapitulasi Pileg, PDIP Raup Suara Terbesar". Tempo. Retrieved 2019-05-20.
  144. ^ "KPU Tetapkan PDIP Raih Suara Terbanyak Pileg 2019". CNN Indonesia (in Indonesian). 2019-05-21. Retrieved 2019-05-21.
  145. ^ a b c "Quick Count Pemilu Pileg 2019". CNN Indonesia (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 18 April 2019. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  146. ^ "Perbandingan Real Count Pileg 2014 dengan Quick Count Pileg 2019". Rakyatku (in Indonesian). 18 April 2019. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  147. ^ a b Syaiful, Anri (19 April 2019). "Parpol Lolos ke Senayan Versi Quick Count Pileg 2019". liputan6.com (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 19 April 2019. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  148. ^ "Lembaga survei: Jumlah golput di Pilpres 2019 paling rendah sejak 2004". BBC Indonesia (in Indonesian). 3 May 2019. Retrieved 21 May 2019.
  149. ^ Bland, Ben (15 April 2019). "The World's Most Complicated Single-Day Election Is a Feat of Democracy". The Atlantic. Retrieved 21 May 2019.
  150. ^ "Pemilu Serentak 2019 Terlalu Rumit, Pileg-Pilpres Harus Dipisah". Bisnis.com. 19 April 2019. Archived from the original on 19 April 2019. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  151. ^ "Petugas KPPS Meninggal di Pemilu Serentak Tembus 225 Orang". CNN Indonesia (in Indonesian). 25 April 2019. Retrieved 25 April 2019.
  152. ^ "Dinilai Terlalu Rumit, JK Ingin Pilpres dan Pileg Dipisah Pada 2024". Suara.com (in Indonesian). 18 April 2019. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  153. ^ Sukoyo, Yeremia (29 August 2018). "Pemilu Serentak 2024 Dikhawatirkan Lebihi Kemampuan Negara". Berita Satu (in Indonesian). Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  154. ^ Beo Da Costa, Agustinus (9 May 2019). "Indonesia should probe deaths of election staff - parliament deputy". Reuters. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  155. ^ "Former corruption convicts barred from participating in 2019 election". The Jakarta Post. 4 July 2018. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  156. ^ "KPU defends regulation on banning corruption-tainted candidates". The Jakarta Post. 13 June 2018. Archived from the original on 15 August 2018. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  157. ^ "Ex-graft convicts may contest election: Court". The Jakarta Post. 14 September 2018. Archived from the original on 14 September 2018. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  158. ^ "Total 38 Caleg Eks Koruptor Diusung di Pileg 2019, Ini Daftarnya". KOMPAS (in Indonesian). 21 September 2018. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  159. ^ "KIPP Soal Data Caleg Tak Transparan: KPU Harusnya Malu". CNN Indonesia (in Indonesian). 14 November 2018. Archived from the original on 5 December 2018. Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  160. ^ Medistiara, Yulida (17 December 2018). "KPU Bikin Kotak Suara 'Kardus': Kami Ingin Pemilu Murah". detiknews (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 18 December 2018. Retrieved 17 December 2018.
  161. ^ Prasetia, Andhika (16 December 2018). "KPU: Semua Fraksi DPR Setuju Kotak Suara 'Kardus'". detiknews (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 18 December 2018. Retrieved 17 December 2018.
  162. ^ "Sandi Sebut Kotak Suara 'Kardus' Rawan Potensi Kecurangan". CNN Indonesia (in Indonesian). 17 December 2018. Archived from the original on 18 December 2018. Retrieved 17 December 2018.
  163. ^ "Persoalkan Kotak Suara Kardus, Gerindra Dinilai PDIP Mulai Mempersiapkan Alasan Kalah". Merdeka (in Indonesian). 17 December 2018. Archived from the original on 16 December 2018. Retrieved 17 December 2018.
  164. ^ Setiawan, Riyan (17 December 2018). "KPU Pontang-Panting Yakinkan Publik Soal Kotak Suara Kardus". tirto.id (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 18 December 2018. Retrieved 17 December 2018.
  165. ^ Bhwana, Petir Garda (2019-04-15). "Hundreds of Indonesia Election Ballot Boxes Damaged in Flood". Tempo. Archived from the original on 2019-04-18. Retrieved 2019-04-18.
  166. ^ "KPU Bantul Terima 70 Kotak Suara Kardus Rusak karena Basah". CNN Indonesia (in Indonesian). 17 December 2018. Archived from the original on 17 December 2018. Retrieved 17 December 2018.
  167. ^ LombokPost, Redaksi (2019-04-16). "Kotak Suara Rusak Terkena Air Hujan". Lombok Post (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 2019-04-18. Retrieved 2019-04-18.
  168. ^ Mulyono, Yakub. "Duh, 9 Kotak Surat Suara Pemilu 2019 di Jember Rusak Dimakan Rayap". detiknews (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 2019-04-18. Retrieved 2019-04-18.
  169. ^ Amirullah (2019-02-23). "Kotak Suara Kardus di Cilacap Dimakan Rayap". Tempo (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 2019-04-18. Retrieved 2019-04-18.
  170. ^ Jones, Sidney (22 January 2019). "Indonesia: releasing Abu Bakar Ba'asyir wrong on all counts". The Interpreter. Archived from the original on 23 January 2019. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  171. ^ "Moeldoko Sebut Batasan Yusril Bantu Jokowi Bebaskan Ba'asyir". CNN Indonesia. 23 January 2019. Archived from the original on 24 January 2019. Retrieved 24 January 2019.
  172. ^ Marlinda Oktavia Erwanti (3 April 2018). "Indo Barometer: Prabowo Jalankan Strategi Donald Trump" [Indo Barometer: Prabowo Executes Donald Trump's Strategies]. Detik.com (in Indonesian). Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  173. ^ Bagus Prihantoro Nugroho (12 October 2018). "Antara 'Make Indonesia Great Again' Prabowo dan Kemenangan Trump" [Between Prabowo's 'Make Indonesia Great Again' and Trump's Victory]. Detik.com (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 12 October 2018. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  174. ^ Massola, James (20 October 2018). "Prabowo wants to 'make Indonesia great again'". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 12 October 2018. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  175. ^ Indra Komara (2 December 2018). "Panitia Reuni 212: Arahan HRS, Kami Ganti 'Alumni' Jadi 'Mujahid'" [212 Reunion Committee: On Rizieq's Order, We Changed 'Alumni' to 'Mujahideen']. Detik.com (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 23 January 2019. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  176. ^ Haris Prabowo (6 December 2018). "Ada Donald Trump di Balik Makian Prabowo Terhadap Wartawan" [There Was Donald Trump Behind Prabowo's Abuse Towards Journalists]. Detik.com (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 24 January 2019. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  177. ^ Restu Woro Yuniar (19 January 2019). "Indonesia's Prabowo Subianto plays to Muslim voters in a twist of faith before election". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 25 January 2019. Retrieved 24 January 2019. ... Prabowo’s move to align himself with Muslim hardliners...
  178. ^ "Dari Mekkah, Rizieq Shihab Kembali Kampanyekan Prabowo-Sandi" [From Mecca, Rizieq Shihab Campaigning for Prabowo-Sandi Again]. CNN Indonesia (in Indonesian). 23 January 2019. Archived from the original on 24 January 2019. Retrieved 24 January 2019.
  179. ^ Gibran Maulana Ibrahim (4 November 2018). "Prabowo Kembali Janji Jemput Habib Rizieq Jika Terpilih Presiden" [Prabowo Promises Again to Pick Habib Rizieq Up If Elected President]. Detik.com (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 24 January 2019. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  180. ^ Gumiwang, Ringkang (16 August 2018). "Anggaran Pemilu dan Pilpres 2019 Capai Rp24,9 triliun". tirto.id (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 5 December 2018. Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  181. ^ "Anggaran Pemilu Serentak 2019 capai Rp16,8 Triliun". Media Indonesia (in Indonesian). 8 December 2017. Archived from the original on 5 December 2018. Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  182. ^ "KPU Ajukan Anggaran Rp 15 Triliun untuk Pemilu 2019". liputan6.com (in Indonesian). 6 September 2018. Archived from the original on 5 December 2018. Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  183. ^ Safutra, Ilham (7 September 2018). "Sukseskan Pemilu 2019, KPU Minta Dana Rp 18 T, Bawaslu 8,6 T". Jawa Pos (in Indonesian). Archived from the original on 5 December 2018. Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  184. ^ "Pengin Tahu Honor Petugas KPPS di Pemilu 2019?". JPNN (in Indonesian). 9 January 2019. Retrieved 22 April 2019.