2019 International Championship (snooker)

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International Championship
Tournament information
Dates4–11 August 2019
VenueBaihu Media Broadcasting Centre
CityDaqing
CountryChina
Organisation(s)WPBSA
FormatRanking event
Total prize fund£802,000
Winner's share£175,000
Highest break Judd Trump (ENG) (141)
 Mark Allen (NIR) (141)
Final
Champion Judd Trump (ENG)
Runner-up Shaun Murphy (ENG)
Score10–3
2018

The 2019 International Championship was a professional ranking snooker tournament that took place from 4 to 11 August 2019 at the Baihu Media Broadcasting Centre in Daqing, China. It was the second ranking event of the 2019/2020 season and the eighth iteration of the International Championship first held in 2012.

Northern Irish cueist Mark Allen was the defending champion, after defeating Australian Neil Robertson in the previous year's final. Allen, however, lost 9–6 to England's Shaun Murphy in the semi-finals. Reigning world champion Judd Trump won the event and his 12th ranking championship with a 10–3 win over Murphy in the final. In winning the event, Trump returned to the world number one position, that he had last held in 2013.

Trump and Allen tied for the highest break during the television stages, both scoring 141, with Trump also making 12 centuries throughout the tournament. Qualifying for the event took place 14–17 June 2019 in Ponds Forge International Sports Centre in Sheffield, England. Tom Ford made the 152nd official maximum break, the fourth of his career, in his 6–1 win in qualifying over Fraser Patrick.

Tournament format[edit]

The event was the eighth iteration of the International Championship, having been first held in 2012.[1] The event took place from 4–11 August 2019 at the Baihu Media Broadcasting Centre in Daqing, China.[2][3] The event was the second ranking event of the 2019/20 snooker season after the 2019 Riga Masters won by Yan Bingtao.[4]

Qualifying for the event was held from 14–17 June 2019 at the Ponds Forge International Sports Centre in Sheffield, England featuring one round of 64 matches.[5] Matches were played as best of 11 frames matches until the semi-finals and finals. The semi-finals were played as best of 17 frames, whilst the final was played as a best of 19 frames match.[2]

Prize fund[edit]

The championship total fund was higher than that of the previous years event, with a total of £802,000 (up from £775,000). The winner of the event received the same prize money as in previous years, at £175,000. The breakdown of prize money for this year is shown below:[6]

  • Winner: £175,000
  • Runner-up: £75,000
  • Semi-final: £32,000
  • Quarter-final: £21,500
  • Last 16: £13,500
  • Last 32: £8,500
  • Last 64: £4,750
  • Highest break: £6,000
  • Total: £802,000

Tournament summary[edit]

The championship began on 4 August 2019, with the round of 64, alongside heldover qualifier matches.[7] Two matches in the heldover qualifier rounds were decided on a deciding frame. Ding Junhui defeated Simon Lichtenberg despite being 5–3 behind, whilst four-time world champion John Higgins defeated amateur under 21 world champion Wu Yize despite being 4–3 behind to the 15 year old.[8] Judd Trump in his first tournament after winning the 2019 World Snooker Championship scored three century breaks in his qualifier to defeat Jordan Brown 6–1.[9]

Early rounds (round one–quarter-finals)[edit]

Two top 16 ranked players were defeated in the last 64; Mark Williams lost to Jak Jones whilst Barry Hawkins to Daniel Wells both 2–6.[10] Ding Junhui defeated three fellow Chinese players in the first three rounds, overcoming Zhao Xintong, Xiao Guodong and Liang Wenbo to reach the quarter-finals. Defending champion Mark Allen conceded just four frames to draw Ding, having defeated Sam Craigie, Mark Davis (both 6–1) and Ali Carter (6–2).[11][12][13] Allen defeated Ding 6–3 to reach the semi-finals. As the sole remaining Chinese player in the competition, some Chinese viewers were reported to have stopped watching the event.[14]

Graeme Dott qualified to play Shaun Murphy in the second quarter-final. Dott defeated Michael White before defeating two world champions in Stuart Bingham and John Higgins to reach the quarter-final.[15] Murphy, who had reached only the 2018 Scottish Open final in the previous season defeated Yuan Sijun 6–5 and Riga Masters champion Yan Bingtao 6–4 before drawing a rematch of the second round match at the 2019 World Championships against Neil Robertson. Murphy defeated Robertson on a deciding frame 6–5.[15][16] Murphy defeated Dott 6–4 to draw Allen in the semi-final.

Three time world champion Mark Selby played just English players to reach the second semi-final, after defeating Liam Highfield and Ben Woollaston(both 6–3), before playing World Championship semi-finalists David Gilbert and Gary Wilson, defeating both on a deciding frame 6–5.[17][18][19] World champion Judd Trump reached the semi-finals defeating Zhang Anda, Scott Donaldson, Joe Perry and Tom Ford.[20]

Semi-final–final[edit]

Reigning world champion Judd Trump won the event, defeating Shaun Murphy in the final 10–3.

The first semi-final took place on 9 August 2019, between Selby and Trump. In reaching the semi-finals, Trump was guarenteed to return to world number one after the tournament, previously held by Ronnie O'Sullivan, having last held the rank in 2013.[21] Selby started off the match quickest, winning three of the first four frames to lead 3–1.[17] However, Trump won the next four frames to lead 5–3 after the first session with breaks of 97, 108, 97 and 116.[17] In the second session, Trump won the first three frames to lead 8–3 including two more 90+ breaks. Selby took frame 12 before Trump won the match in frame 13 with a break of 72.[22] Post match, Trump commented "It was probably somewhere near how I was playing to win the World Championship," describing his form and scoring within the match.[17]

The second semi-final was a rematch of the 2019 Scottish Masters final between Murphy and Allen. Murphy won the first five frames of the match, with Allen not scoring a single point until frame four.[23] Allen fought back to trail 3–6 after the first session.[23] Murphy won the first frame of the second session, before Allen won the next two. Murphy won frame 13 to need just one more frame for victory. Allen won the next two frames to push the match into the interval. Murphy however won frame 15 to win the match 9–6 with a break of 66.[23][24]

The final was played as a best of 19 frames match held over two sessions on 11 August 2019. Trump won the first five frames of the match including a century break in frame three. Murphy, however won three of the remaining four frames of the session to trail 3–6.[25] On the resume of the match, Trump dominated the remaining frames, winning the next four frames to win the match 10–3, completing eight half-centuries in the match.[26] The victory was Trump's twelfth ranking event title, twelth match unbeaten in a row, and had scored twelve centuries during the event.[27]

The win was the first time a reigning world champion won the first championship that they had competed in after the event, since Ronnie O'Sullivan in 2008.[28] In losing the event, Murphy commented that he was "disapointed" and that he didn’t really feature in the game: "Judd swamped me, that was how it felt."[9]

Main draw[edit]

 
Last 64
Best of 11 frames
Last 32
Best of 11 frames
Last 16
Best of 11 frames
Quarter-finals
Best of 11 frames
Semi-finals
Best of 17 frames
Final
Best of 19 frames
 
                      
 
 
 
 
 Mark Allen (NIR)6
 
 
 
 Sam Craigie (ENG)1
 
Northern Ireland Mark Allen6
 
 
 
England Mark Davis1
 
 Mark Davis (ENG)6
 
 
 
 Matthew Selt (ENG)3
 
Northern Ireland Mark Allen6
 
 
 
England Ali Carter2
 
 Ali Carter (ENG)6
 
 
 
 Alan McManus (SCO)5
 
England Ali Carter6
 
 
 
Norway Kurt Maflin3
 
 Ryan Day (WAL)4
 
 
 
 Kurt Maflin (NOR)6
 
Northern Ireland Mark Allen6
 
 
 
China Ding Junhui3
 
 Ashley Carty (ENG)5
 
 
 
 Xiao Guodong (CHN)6
 
China Xiao Guodong1
 
 
 
China Ding Junhui6
 
 Zhao Xintong (CHN)4
 
 
 
 Ding Junhui (CHN)6
 
China Ding Junhui6
 
 
 
China Liang Wenbo5
 
 Liang Wenbo (CHN)6
 
 
 
 Duane Jones (WAL)5
 
China Liang Wenbo6
 
 
 
Wales Daniel Wells4
 
 Daniel Wells (WAL)6
 
 
 
 Barry Hawkins (ENG)2
 
Northern Ireland Mark Allen6
 
 
 
England Shaun Murphy9
 
 John Higgins (SCO)6
 
 
 
 David Grace (ENG)4
 
Scotland John Higgins6
 
 
 
England Elliot Slessor3
 
 Elliot Slessor (ENG)6
 
 
 
 Louis Heathcote (ENG)4
 
Scotland John Higgins2
 
 
 
Scotland Graeme Dott6
 
 Stuart Bingham (ENG)6
 
 
 
 Mark Joyce (ENG)1
 
England Stuart Bingham3
 
 
 
Scotland Graeme Dott6
 
 Graeme Dott (SCO)6
 
 
 
 Michael White (WAL)1
 
Scotland Graeme Dott4
 
 
 
England Shaun Murphy6
 
 Chang Bingyu (CHN)3
 
 
 
 Yan Bingtao (CHN)6
 
China Yan Bingtao4
 
 
 
England Shaun Murphy6
 
 Yuan Sijun (CHN)5
 
 
 
 Shaun Murphy (ENG)6
 
England Shaun Murphy6
 
 
 
Australia Neil Robertson5
 
 Thepchaiya Un-Nooh (THA)2
 
 
 
 Ricky Walden (ENG)6
 
England Ricky Walden5
 
 
 
Australia Neil Robertson6
 
 Nigel Bond (ENG)2
 
 
 
 Neil Robertson (AUS)6
 
England Shaun Murphy3
 
 
 
England Judd Trump10
 
 Mark Williams (WAL)2
 
 
 
 Jak Jones (WAL)6
 
Wales Jak Jones6
 
 
 
England Robert Milkins3
 
 Zhou Yuelong (CHN)3
 
 
 
 Robert Milkins (ENG)6
 
Wales Jak Jones3
 
 
 
England Gary Wilson6
 
 Luca Brecel (BEL)6
 
 
 
 Sunny Akani (THA)3
 
Belgium Luca Brecel2
 
 
 
England Gary Wilson6
 
 Gary Wilson (ENG)6
 
 
 
 Peter Ebdon (ENG)1
 
England Gary Wilson5
 
 
 
England Mark Selby6
 
 Michael Holt (ENG)3
 
 
 
 Anthony McGill (SCO)6
 
Scotland Anthony McGill1
 
 
 
England David Gilbert6
 
 Ken Doherty (IRL)2
 
 
 
 David Gilbert (ENG)6
 
England David Gilbert5
 
 
 
England Mark Selby6
 
 Ben Woollaston (ENG)6
 
 
 
 Mark King (ENG)3
 
England Ben Woollaston3
 
 
 
England Mark Selby6
 
 Liam Highfield (ENG)3
 
 
 
 Mark Selby (ENG)6
 
England Mark Selby4
 
 
 
England Judd Trump9
 
 Kyren Wilson (ENG)6
 
 
 
 Robbie Williams (ENG)2
 
England Kyren Wilson5
 
 
 
England Tom Ford6
 
 Tom Ford (ENG)w/o
 
 
 
 Hossein Vafaei (IRN)w/d
 
England Tom Ford6
 
 
 
England Andrew Higginson4
 
 Jack Lisowski (ENG)5
 
 
 
 Andrew Higginson (ENG)6
 
England Andrew Higginson6
 
 
 
England Jimmy Robertson4
 
 Jimmy Robertson (ENG)6
 
 
 
 Matthew Stevens (WAL)4
 
England Tom Ford3
 
 
 
England Judd Trump6
 
 Chris Wakelin (ENG)2
 
 
 
 Joe Perry (ENG)6
 
England Joe Perry6
 
 
 
Scotland Stephen Maguire2
 
 Stuart Carrington (ENG)0
 
 
 
 Stephen Maguire (SCO)6
 
England Joe Perry2
 
 
 
England Judd Trump6
 
 Scott Donaldson (SCO)6
 
 
 
 Martin Gould (ENG)4
 
Scotland Scott Donaldson4
 
 
 
England Judd Trump6
 
 Zhang Anda (CHN)2
 
 
 Judd Trump (ENG)6
 

Final[edit]

Final: Best of 19 frames. Referee: China Lyu Xilin.
Baihu Media Broadcasting Centre, Daqing, China, 11 August 2019.
Shaun Murphy
 England
3–10 Judd Trump
 England
Afternoon: 14–85, 5–83 (58), 19–108 (104), 0–77 (58), 0–69, 87–0 (87), 68–37, 23–86 (74), 79–0 (79)
Evening: 0–80 (80), 30–90 (63), 6–102 (102), 9–99 (62)
87 Highest break 104
0 Century breaks 2
2 50+ breaks 8

Qualifying[edit]

Matches were played between 14 and 17 June 2019 at the Ponds Forge International Sports Centre in Sheffield, England. Matches involving Mark Allen, Sam Craigie, Ding Junhui, John Higgins, Yan Bingtao, Sunny Akani, Anthony McGill and Judd Trump, were played in Daqing. All matches were the best of 11 frames.[5]

Century breaks[edit]

Televised stage centuries[edit]

A total of 63 century breaks were made during the tournament. Judd Trump and Mark Allen shared the highest break of the tournament, with both players making a break of 141. In addition, Trump made a total of 12 centuries, eight more than any other player.[29]

Qualifying stage centuries[edit]

A total of 42 century breaks were made during the qualifying tournament preceding the event, including a maximum break from Tom Ford.[29][30]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ a b "Snooker Calendar 2019–20" (PDF). worldsnooker.com. Archived (PDF) from the original on 7 May 2019. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
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  20. ^ "Judd Trump to play Mark Selby in International Championship semi-finals in China". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 9 August 2019. Retrieved 11 August 2019.
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  22. ^ "Snooker news – Judd Trump beats Mark Selby to reach International Championship final". Eurosport. 8 September 2019. Retrieved 11 August 2019.
  23. ^ a b c "Snooker news – Shaun Murphy into International Championship final after win over Mark Allen". Eurosport. 8 October 2019. Retrieved 11 August 2019.
  24. ^ "Murphy wraps up victory over Allen at International Championship". Video Eurosport UK. 8 October 2019. Retrieved 11 August 2019.
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  29. ^ a b "Centuries". World Snooker. 11 August 2019. Archived from the original on 11 August 2019. Retrieved 11 August 2019.
  30. ^ "Qualifier Centuries". World Snooker. 11 August 2019. Archived from the original on 11 August 2019. Retrieved 11 August 2019.