2019 Irish local elections

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2019 Irish local elections

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949 County and City Council Seats
  First party Second party Third party
  Micheál Martin 2015 (cropped).jpg Leo Varadkar 2016.jpg Mary Lou McDonald (official portrait) (cropped).jpg
Leader Micheál Martin Leo Varadkar Mary Lou McDonald
Party Fianna Fáil Fine Gael Sinn Féin
Leader since 26 January 2011 2 June 2017 10 February 2018
Last election 267 235 159

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Brendan Howlin Aviva.jpg Eamon Ryan Green Party.jpg
Leader Brendan Howlin Collective leadership Eamon Ryan
Party Labour Party Solidarity–PBP Green Party
Leader since 20 May 2016 n/a 27 May 2011
Last election 51 28[n 1] 12

  Eighth party
  Róisín Shortall TD and Catherine Murphy TD cropped.jpg
Leader Catherine Murphy
Róisín Shortall
Party Social Democrats
Leader since 15 July 2015
Last election n/a (new party)

The 2019 Irish local elections will be held in all local authorities in Ireland on Friday, 24 May 2019, on the same day as the 2019 European Parliament election.[1] Each local government area is divided into local electoral areas (LEAs) where three to seven councillors are elected by means of the single transferable vote.[2] In the local authorities outside of Dublin, Cork City and Galway City, municipal districts meet comprising the councillors of one or more LEAs.

Boundary changes[edit]

There will be one change to the local government areas since the 2014 elections, after the Local Government Act 2019 has effected a transfer of land from County Cork to Cork city.[3] Reviews of the county boundaries near Drogheda,[4][5] Athlone,[6][7] and Carlow (Graiguecullen)[8][9] recommended no change. A review recommending transfer of Ferrybank from Kilkenny County Council to Waterford City and County Council was rejected by minister Simon Coveney after objections from Kilkenny.[10][11]

The boundaries of municipal districts and LEAs were revised by John Paul Phelan, Minister of State at the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government, based on recommendations from two Local Electoral Area Boundary Committees established in 2017, which reported on 13 June 2018.[12][13][14] Whereas, since 2014, most districts have a single LEA and all LEAs (except for Cork city) have between 6 and 10 councillors, in 2019 LEAs will have between 3 and 7 councillors and many districts have two LEAs.

Mayoral Plebiscites[edit]

There is a proposal for a plebiscite under the Local Government Act 2019 on a directly-elected mayor in Cork, Limerick and Waterford to be held on the same date.[15]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Contested the 2014 election as two separate parties: Anti-Austerity Alliance and People Before Profit. Each won 14 seats.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "EXCLUSIVE: A former local councillor has announced his intention to run in the 2019 Local Elections".
  2. ^ "Local Elections in Ireland". Citizens Information Board. Retrieved 25 January 2018.
  3. ^ "Local Government Act 2019". Irish Statute Book. Attorney General of Ireland. 25 January 2019. Retrieved 23 February 2019.
  4. ^ Casey, Ann (1 March 2017). "No changes for Meath boundaries". Meath Chronicle. Retrieved 25 January 2018.
  5. ^ "Report of the Drogheda Boundary Review Committee" (PDF). Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government. 16 February 2017. Retrieved 23 February 2019.
  6. ^ McGarry, Patsy (24 Nov 2016). "Roscommon safe as boundary review recommends no change". The Irish Times. Retrieved 25 January 2018.
  7. ^ "Report of the Athlone Boundary Review Committee" (PDF). Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government. 3 November 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2019.
  8. ^ Miller, Steven (8 February 2017). "Graiguecullen to stay in Laois, proposes Boundary Committee". Laois Today. Retrieved 25 January 2018.
  9. ^ "Report of the Carlow Boundary Review Committee" (PDF). Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government. December 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2019.
  10. ^ "Report of the Waterford Boundary Review Committee" (PDF). Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government. December 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2019.
  11. ^ "Coveney issues statement on the recommendations of the Waterford Boundary Committee" (Press release). Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government. 3 Apr 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2018.
  12. ^ "Local Electoral Area Boundary Committees 2017 - Home Page". boundarycommittee.ie. Retrieved 2018-06-18.
  13. ^ Local Electoral Area Boundary Committee No. 1 Report 2018 (PDF). Dublin: Government Publications. 13 June 2018. ISBN 978-1-4064-2990-9.
  14. ^ Local Electoral Area Boundary Committee No. 2 Report 2018 (PDF). Dublin: Government Publications. 13 June 2018. ISBN 978-1-4064-2991-6.
  15. ^ "Proposal for directly elected mayors – Minister Phelan's Opening Dáil Statement". Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government. 24 January 2019. Retrieved 28 January 2019.