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2019 London Marathon

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39th London Marathon
2019 London Marathon.png2019 London Marathon IMG 9029 (32788526567) edited.jpg
Sinead Diver running in the elite women's race
VenueLondon, United Kingdom
Date28 April 2019
Champions
MenEliud Kipchoge (2:02:37)
WomenBrigid Kosgei (2:18:20)
Wheelchair menDaniel Romanchuk (1:33:38)
Wheelchair womenManuela Schär (1:44:09)
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The 2019 London Marathon was the 39th running of the annual marathon race in London, United Kingdom, which took place on 28 April. The elite men's race was won by Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge, who took his fourth London Marathon victory in a time of 2:02:37, the second fastest marathon ever at that point. The women's race was won by Brigid Kosgei, also of Kenya, in 2:18:20. American Daniel Romanchuk won the men's wheelchair title in 1:33:38 while Switzerland's Manuela Schär won the women's title in 1:44:09. Changes were made to the course to make it more environmentally friendly; the number of plastic bottles used was reduced and biodegradable alternatives were used instead.

Course[edit]

The Mall, the location of the finish of the race.

The marathon distance is officially 42.195 kilometres (26.219 mi) long as sanctioned by World Athletics (IAAF).[1] The London Marathon is run over a mainly flat course, starting in Blackheath.[2] The course begins at four separate points and they converge after 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) during which the course is downhill.[3] At just after 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) into the race, the runners reach the 19th-century clipper Cutty Sark docked in Greenwich[4] and at about halfway into the race, the runners cross Tower Bridge[3] before heading east into Shadwell and Canary Wharf.[2] After winding through Canary Wharf, the route returns back through Shadwell on the other side of the road to which it entered before passing through Tower Hill.[3] The runners enter the underpass in Blackfriars before running along the Thames Embankment, past Westminster and onto Birdcage Walk.[3][2] The course then runs parallel to St James's Park before turning onto The Mall and finishing in front of Buckingham Palace.[3][2]

Field[edit]

The favourite for the men's race was Eliud Kipchoge, winner of the 2015, 2016, and 2018 editions.[5] Abraham Kiptum was due to race but did not compete due to a biological passport violation,[6] and was later suspended in November for an anti-doping violation.[7] A much anticipated appearance was from Briton Mo Farah despite being an underdog and the bookmaker's second favourite pick.[8] Shura Kitata, runner-up in the 2018 edition, also competed.[5]

In the women's race, defending champion Vivian Cheruiyot and three-time London Marathon winner Mary Keitany were favourites.[9] David Weir was favourite in the men's wheelchair race, having won a total of eight editions of the race.[10] 2018 winner Madison de Rozario raced along with five-time New York City Marathon winner Tatyana McFadden, and Manuela Schär in the women's wheelchair race.[10]

The wheelchair race started at 9:05 BST (UTC+1), the women's race at 9:25 BST, and the men's race at 10:10 BST.[11] A new competition, the Flying 400, was introduced in the wheelchair race. It consisted of a 400 metres (1,300 ft) sprint at the 20 kilometres (12 mi) mark, with the winner receiving $8,000 and second place receiving $3,800 for both the men and women's race.[11][12] In the other races, the winner received £42,000, with second and third winning £23,000 and £17,000, respectively.[11]

Race summary[edit]

Daniel Romanchuk, winner of the men's wheelchair race.
Manuela Schär, winner of the women's wheelchair race.

In the wheelchair race, Weir fell out of the leading group following the Flying 400 sprint.[13] 20-year-old American Daniel Romanchuk managed to pull away from the lead group in the last kilometre to win in a time of 1:33:38.[14] Marcel Hug of Switzerland and Tomoki Suzuki of Japan finished second and third respectively, while Weir finished fifth.[14] In the women's wheelchair race, Schär dropped the other competitors about 30 minutes into the race,[15] and was able to win in a time of 1:44:09.[14] Rozario and McFadden finished over five minutes later in second and third, respectively.[14]

Brigid Kosgei, winner of the women's race.

The women's race contained four pacemakers, and three of them left the rest of the runners behind within the first five minutes of the race.[15] The race had got off to a slow start and they went through 4.5 miles (7.2 km) at about 2:20:00 pace.[15] They passed the 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) mark at about 2:21:00 pace, four minutes slower than the women's only world record set by Keitany at the 2017 edition.[16] The pace slowed even further, passing halfway in 1:11:38.[17] About 90 minutes into the race, Keitany began to drop from the lead group as Kenyan Brigid Kosgei and Cheruiyot began to move away from the rest.[15] At 35 kilometres (22 mi), Kosgei had put a three second gap between herself and Cheruiyot and just five minutes later had completely dropped her.[15] She managed to hold the lead and finished in a time of 2:18:20, with a second-half split time of 1:06:42, the fastest in women's marathon history.[17] Cheruiyot finished second in 2:20:14, 2018 Dubai Marathon winner Roza Dereje finished third in 2:20:51, whilst Keitany finished fifth.[17]

Eliud Kipchoge, winner of the men's race.

British tennis player Andy Murray started the men's race.[18] A group of nine formed and they ran at a controlled pace, passing 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) in 29:01 and halfway in 1:01:37.[19] Once the pacemakers had dropped out, Kipchoge took lead of the group which included Shura, Mule Wasihun, Mosinet Geremew, Farah, Wilson Kipsang Kiprotich, and Tamirat Tola.[15][19] Kipchoge began to increase the pace, leaving only himself, Mosinet, Mule, and Shura in the lead group by the 30 kilometres (19 mi) point. From mile 20 to 24, they ran a pace of about 4:40 per mile, enough to drop Shura and Mule.[19] However, Kipchoge soon left Mosinet behind after nearly two hours of racing and waved to the crowd as he crossed the finish line in 2:02:37.[15] Mosinet finished second in 2:02:55, Mule finished third in 2:03:16, Shura finished fourth in 2:05:01, and Farah finished fifth in 2:05:39. Kipchoge broke the previous London Marathon record by 28 seconds which he had set in 2016, and also ran the second quickest marathon in history behind his 2018 Berlin Marathon performance.[20][21]

Non-elite race[edit]

About 42,000 runners took part in the non-elite race and the total raised for charities surpassed £1 billion since the race began in 1981.[22][23][24] The organisers of the race decided to reduce the number of plastic bottles being used during the race by using biodegradable, edible water pods made of seaweed extract known as Ooho. They were invented by London-based Skipping Rocks Lab.[25] They also reduced the number of water stations from 26 to 19 and reduced the number of plastic bottles on the course by 215,000.[26]

Results[edit]

Elite men[edit]

Position[27][28] Athlete Nationality Time
1st place, gold medalist(s) Eliud Kipchoge  Kenya 2:02:37
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Mosinet Geremew  Ethiopia 2:02:55
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Mule Wasihun  Ethiopia 2:03:16
4 Shura Kitata  Ethiopia 2:05:01
5 Mo Farah  United Kingdom 2:05:39
6 Tamirat Tola  Ethiopia 2:06:57
7 Bashir Abdi  Belgium 2:07:03
8 Leul Gebrasilase  Ethiopia 2:07:15
9 Yassine Rachik  Italy 2:08:05
10 Callum Hawkins  United Kingdom 2:08:14

Elite women[edit]

Position[29][28] Athlete Nationality Time
1st place, gold medalist(s) Brigid Kosgei  Kenya 2:18:20
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Vivian Cheruiyot  Kenya 2:20:14
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Roza Dereje  Ethiopia 2:20:51
4 Gladys Cherono Kiprono  Kenya 2:20:52
5 Mary Jepkosgei Keitany  Kenya 2:20:58
6 Emily Sisson  United States 2:23:08
7 Sinead Diver  Australia 2:24:11
8 Carla Salomé Rocha  Portugal 2:24:47
9 Birhane Dibaba  Ethiopia 2:25:04
10 Charlotte Purdue  United Kingdom 2:25:38

Wheelchair men[edit]

Position[28] Athlete Nationality Time
1st place, gold medalist(s) Daniel Romanchuk  United States 1:33:38
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Marcel Hug   Switzerland 1:33:42
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Tomoki Suzuki  Japan 1:33:51
4 Dai Yuqiang  China 1:37:30
5 David Weir  United Kingdom 1:37:32
6 Ernst van Dyk  South Africa 1:37:32
7 Jordi Madera  Spain 1:37:32
8 Hiroki Nishida  Japan 1:37:34
9 Aaron Pike  United States 1:37:34
10 Hiroyuki Yamamoto  Japan 1:37:34

Wheelchair women[edit]

Position[28] Athlete Nationality Time
1st place, gold medalist(s) Manuela Schär   Switzerland 1:44:09
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Tatyana McFadden  United States 1:49:42
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Madison de Rozario  Australia 1:49:44
4 Eliza Ault-Connell  Australia 1:50:02
5 Tsubasa Kina  Japan 1:51:22
6 Zou Lihong  China 1:52:10
7 Katrina Gerhard  United States 1:52:11
8 Nikita den Boer  Netherlands 1:52:12
9 Arielle Rausin  United States 1:52:12
10 Aline Dos Santos Rocha  Brazil 1:52:13

References[edit]

  1. ^ "IAAF Competition Rules for Road Races". International Association of Athletics Federations. 2009. Archived from the original on 23 September 2015. Retrieved 15 February 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d Hughes, David (28 April 2019). "London Marathon 2019 route: map, road closures, start times and where to watch". inews.co.uk. Retrieved 15 February 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ a b c d e Harris-Fry, Nick (25 April 2019). "The Runner's Guide To The London Marathon Route". coachmag.co.uk. Retrieved 30 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "History of Cutty Sark". rmg.co.uk. Retrieved 16 February 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ a b "London Marathon 2019: World record holder Eliud Kipchoge to defend title". bbc.co.uk. 14 January 2019. Retrieved 18 January 2021.
  6. ^ "Eliud Kipchoge puts London Marathon challenge to Sir Mo Farah". sport.bt.com. 27 April 2019. Retrieved 18 January 2021.
  7. ^ "Abraham Kiptum: Kenyan runner gets four-year ban for anti-doping violation". bbc.co.uk. 11 November 2019. Retrieved 18 January 2021.
  8. ^ Doward, Jamie (27 April 2019). "London Marathon: records could tumble as Mo Farah takes on rivals". theguardian.com. Retrieved 20 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ Haden, Alexis (28 April 2019). "London Marathon 2019: Keitany, Cheruiyot PBs, records and other stats". thesouthafrican.com. Retrieved 20 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ a b Hudson, Elizabeth (25 April 2019). "London Marathon 2019: Johnboy Smith on why 'there is life after disability and tragedy'". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 20 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. ^ a b c Tom, Herbert (18 April 2019). "When is the London Marathon 2019: Date and start time for this year's big run". standard.co.uk. Retrieved 25 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ "Flying 400 introduced to elite wheelchair races at London Marathon". activityalliance.org.uk. 17 April 2019. Retrieved 25 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. ^ "David Weir finishes fifth as Daniel Romanchuk wins London Marathon". richmondandtwickenhamtimes.co.uk. 29 April 2019. Retrieved 25 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  14. ^ a b c d Falkingham, Katie (28 April 2019). "London Marathon 2019: Daniel Romanchuk & Manuela Schar win wheelchair races". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 25 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  15. ^ a b c d e f g Brewin, John (29 April 2019). "London Marathon 2019: Kipchoge and Kosgei win men and women's elite races – as it happened". theguardian.com. Retrieved 28 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  16. ^ Hall, Peter (28 April 2019). "London Marathon 2019: Brigid Kosgei wins women's elite race". standard.co.uk. Retrieved 28 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  17. ^ a b c Dutch, Taylor (28 April 2019). "Brigid Kosgei Becomes Youngest Woman Ever to Win London Marathon". runnersworld.com. Retrieved 29 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  18. ^ "London Marathon: Andy Murray named as official starter". bbc.co.uk. 28 March 2019. Retrieved 29 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  19. ^ a b c Dennehy, Cathal (28 April 2019). "Kipchoge Proves He Has No Equal: Runs 2nd Fastest Marathon Time in History". runnersworld.com. Retrieved 29 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  20. ^ Falkingham, Katie (28 April 2019). "London Marathon 2019: Eliud Kipchoge wins, Mo Farah fifth". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 29 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  21. ^ Ingle, Sean (28 April 2019). "London Marathon: Eliud Kipchoge and Brigid Kosgei win men and women's elite races". theguardian.com. Retrieved 29 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  22. ^ "London Marathon 2019: More than 40,000 taking part". bbc.co.uk. 28 April 2019. Retrieved 29 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  23. ^ "London Marathon fundraising to cross 1 billion pound mark". reuters.com. 25 January 2019. Retrieved 29 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  24. ^ "Record numbers complete 'extraordinary' London Marathon". ITV News. 28 April 2019. Retrieved 28 February 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  25. ^ Young, Sarah (28 April 2019). "London Marathon hands out edible water capsules to reduce plastic bottle waste". independent.co.uk. Retrieved 25 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  26. ^ Cheung, Helier (26 April 2019). "London Marathon: How do you reduce the environmental impact?". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 29 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  27. ^ Hartnett, Sean. "London Marathon Men — Nobody Faster Than Kipchoge". trackandfieldnews.com. Retrieved 15 February 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  28. ^ a b c d "Virgin Money London Marathon Leaderboard". Retrieved 15 February 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  29. ^ Hartnett, Sean. "London Marathon Women — Slow Kosgei Start, Then…!". trackandfieldnews.com. Retrieved 15 February 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External links[edit]