2019 Moscow City Duma election

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2019 Moscow City Duma election
Flag of Moscow, Russia.svg
← 2014 8 September 2019 2024 →
Turnout21.77%
  First party Second party Third party
  No image.svg Valery Rashkin.jpg Валерий Горячев.jpg
Leader Andrey Metelsky Valery Rashkin Valery Goryachev
Party United Russia Communist Party Yabloko
Last election 38 seats 5 seats 0 seats
Seats won 25 13 4
Seat change Decrease 13 Increase 8 Increase 4
Popular vote 495,591 499,643 63,193
Percentage 32.35% 32.62% 4.13%

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  FM9T3618.jpg No image.svg No image.svg
Leader Alexander Romanovich Mikhail Monakhov Andrey Shibaev
Party A Just Russia LDPR Rodina
Last election 0 seats 1 seat 1 seat
Seats won 3 0 0
Seat change Increase 3 Decrease 1 Decrease 1
Popular vote 196,896 138,145 12,187
Percentage 12.85% 9.02% 0.80%

Results of 2019 Moscow City Duma election.svg
Results of the election by district

Election to the 7th convocation of the Moscow City Duma took place on the United Voting Day on 8 September 2019. The elections were held in a first-past-the-post system: 45 deputies were elected in 45 single-member constituencies. The term of the new Duma will be five years.

Background and preparations[edit]

The Moscow City Election Commission organizes 3,616 polling stations, of which 3,440 - at the places of residence, 176 - at places of temporary residence (hospitals, sanatoriums, places of temporary detention of suspects and accused, and other places of temporary stay).[1][2]

Candidates for registration must collect voter signatures in their support in the amount of 3% of all constituency voters (from 4,500 to 5,500 signatures). However, regardless of whether a candidate has enough valid signatures, a candidate will not be on the ballot if more than 10% of the signatures are considered flawed by the Moscow City Election Commission (MCEC).[3][4][5]

Candidates nominated by political parties represented in the State Duma (United Russia, CPRF, LDPR, A Just Russia) could nominate their candidates without collecting signatures. However, United Russia did not formally nominate any candidates. Its supporters will go to the polls as independents because of low ratings of the party.[6][7] In order for as few United Russia 'independent' candidates as possible to go to the Moscow City Duma, Alexey Navalny launched the “Smart Voting” project, calling for voting for the strongest candidates among those who are not members of United Russia.[8]

On 26 July 2019, the "Liberal Mission" Foundation published a report entitled “Results of the nomination and registration at the elections of deputies of the Moscow City Duma on 8 September 2019”. According to the authors of the report Alexander Kenev, Arkady Lyubarev and Andrey Maximov, the results of registration of candidates for the MCD indicate electoral commission's inadequacy and injustice, suggesting that there was an unequal approach and even discrimination in the process of registering candidates.[9]

Constituencies[edit]

The current constituencies' boundaries were adopted on 30 April 2014.[10] According to independent experts, they contain marks of gerrymandering.[11]

The list of constituencies and candidates.[12][13] In central, southwestern and northwestern constituencies the independent opposition candidates had strong chances[14] (see also 2013 Moscow mayoral election, districts where Navalny had good results), in most of other constituencies the strongest opponent is a CPRF candidate.[13] However, some strong candidates, even nominated by political parties represented in the State Duma, were excluded from the race. In constituency 43 no pro-United Russia candidates are registered.

voters required signatures pro-United Russia candidate strongest opponent opponent's affiliation opponent's status
1 170190 5106 Andrey Titov Ivan Ulyanchenko CPRF registered (party nomination)
2 174313 5230 Svetlana Volovets Gennady Gudkov independent, Gudkov's team rejected (more than 10% signatures flawed)
3 177162 5315 Sabina Tsvetkova Timur Abushaev CPRF excluded ("-" instead of "don't have" in the column "foreign property")[15]
4 175445 5264 Maria Kiseleva Zoya Shargatova independent, green rejected (more than 10% signatures flawed)
5 177149 5315 Roman Babayan Dmitry Gudkov independent, Gudkov's team rejected (more than 10% signatures flawed)
6 173647 5210 Mikhail Balykhin Evgeny Bunimovich [ru] independent, Yabloko registered (signatures accepted)
7 171081 5133 Nadezhda Perfilova Piotr Zvagintsev CPRF registered (party nomination)
8 176983 5310 Ekaterina Kopeikina Ivan Zhdanov independent, Navalny's team rejected (more than 10% signatures flawed)
9 173117 5194 Andrey Medvedev Yulia Galyamina independent, Yabloko rejected (more than 10% signatures flawed)
10 176136 5285 Larisa Kartavtseva Yuri Dashkov CPRF registered (party nomination)
11 175532 5266 Evgeny Nifantiev Andrey Babushkin independent, Yabloko rejected (more than 10% signatures flawed)
12 155980 4680 Alexey Shaposhnikov Alexander Efimov CPRF registered (party nomination)
13 166862 5006 Igor Buskin Ilya Lifantsev A Just Russia registered (party nomination)
14 172217 5167 Natalya Pochinok Sergey Tsukasov independent, sup. CPRF excluded ("-" instead of "don't have" in the column "foreign property")[16]
15 145155 4355 Andrey Metelsky Sergey Savostyanov CPRF registered (party nomination)
16 145474 4361 Anton Molev Mikhail Timonov A Just Russia registered (party nomination)
17 145676 4371 Anastasia Tatulova Victor Maximov CPRF registered (party nomination)
18 145147 4355 Nikolay Tabashnikov Elena Yanchuk CPRF registered (party nomination)
19 145340 4361 Irina Nazarova Oleg Sheremetiev CPRF registered (party nomination)
20 147832 4435 Maxim Shingarkin Evgeny Stupin CPRF registered (party nomination)
21 156741 4703 Vera Shevchenko Leonid Zyuganov CPRF registered (party nomination)
22 152760 4583 Inna Svyatenko Dmitry Saraev CPRF registered (party nomination)
23 149075 4473 Elena Nikolaeva Elena Gulicheva CPRF registered (party nomination)
24 176256 5288 Igor Dyagilev Pavel Tarasov CPRF registered (party nomination)
25 148276 4449 Lyudmila Stebenkova Andrey Orel CPRF registered (party nomination)
26 147175 4416 Kirill Shchitov Vladimir Kalinin A Just Russia registered (party nomination)
27 152197 4566 Stepan Orlov Alexey Dryga CPRF registered (party nomination)
28 150374 4512 Elena Samyshina Arkadiy Pavlinov A Just Russia registered (party nomination)
29 149589 4488 Oleg Artemyev Nikolay Sergeev CPRF registered (party nomination)
30 159827 4795 Margarita Rusetskaya Roman Yuneman independent registered (signatures accepted)
31 148433 4453 Sergey Zverev Konstantin Yankauskas independent, Navalny's team rejected (more than 10% signatures flawed)
32 149141 4475 Olga Melnikova Klim Likhachev CPRF registered (party nomination)
33 176224 5287 Lyudmila Guseva Levon Smirnov CPRF registered (party nomination)
34 166292 4989 Alexander Semennikov Yulia Gladkova CPRF registered (party nomination)
35 175756 5273 Natalya Metlina Sergey Vasiliev A Just Russia registered (party nomination)
36 145107 4354 Olga Sharapova Sergey Kurgansky CPRF registered (party nomination)
37 174072 5223 Alexander Romanovich Elena Rusakova independent, Yabloko rejected (more than 10% signatures flawed)
38 174943 5249 Alexander Kozlov Igor Glek A Just Russia registered (party nomination)
39 155001 4651 Valeriy Golovchenko Alexander Vidmanov CPRF registered (party nomination)
40 170305 5110 Tatiana Batysheva Igor Sukhanov CPRF registered (party nomination)
41 162735 4883 Evgeny Gerasimov Olga Frolova CPRF registered (party nomination)
42 160090 4803 Kirill Nikitin Anastasia Bryukhanova independent, Yabloko rejected (more than 10% signatures flawed)
43 149685 4491 Anna Federmesser (withdrew) Lyubov Sobol independent, Navalny's team rejected (more than 10% signatures flawed)
44 159496 4785 Ilya Sviridov Elena Shuvalova CPRF registered (party nomination)
45 150228 4507 Valeria Kasamara Ilya Yashin independent, Navalny's team rejected (more than 10% signatures flawed)
Moscow constituencies. A different color for each one.

Rejection of opposition candidacies[edit]

After the verification of the signatures collected by the candidates, the Moscow City Election Commission (MCEC) refused to register most of independent opposition candidates. The claimed reason was the high percentage of rejected signatures (exceeding permissible reject rate is 10%). Independent candidates accused the MCEC of forgery in verifying signatures aimed at prohibiting the opposition to participate in elections. During the verification some personal data of the signers was entered with errors. In addition, a significant part of the signatures was invalidated on the grounds of a so-called handwriting examination, which scientific validity and impartiality the candidates questioned. The candidates submitted to the MCEC statements confirming the validity of signatures from signatories, whose signatures were rejected on the grounds of handwriting examination. The candidates also submitted to the MCEC an opinion of professional handwriting experts on the insolvency of the MCEC examination. Despite this, the MCEC did not change the decision. In protest, one of the candidates, Lyubov Sobol, went on a hunger strike on July 13.[3][4][5]

On the other hand, the MCEC registered 32 candidates from Communists of Russia party, which has very low popularity (during 2016 election to the State Duma it collected 2%). This party is regarded by experts as a spoiler for CPRF.[17] These candidates are almost unknown in Moscow, mostly students, housewives and low-skilled workers.[18][19] According to the MCEC, these 32 unknown candidates managed to collect the necessary signatures. However, Muscovites did not see any signature collectors for the candidates from Communists of Russia or pro-United Russia 'independent' candidates in the streets of their city.[20] Later, an opposition newspaper Novaya Gazeta revealed that the same headquarters coordinates the actions of candidates from Communists of Russia and pro-United Russia 'independents'.[21]

Starting from July 2019, numerous approved and unapproved rallies in Moscow took place. Rallies on Sakharov Avenue on July 20 and August 10, 2019 became the largest political rallies in Russia after the 2011–2013 protests and the rally on 27 July 27 established a record high for the number of detainees. The protests were accompanied by massive administrative arrests of unregistered independent candidates and two criminal cases: the obstructing the work of election commissions case and the riots case (also known as the Moscow case).[22]

Campaign[edit]

Metelsky agitation cube
Metelsky poster on bus stop
Communists of Russia agitation cube, stilyzed under CPRF

Pro-United Russia candidates[edit]

Positive articles about pro-United Russia candidates began to appear in district newspapers six months before the official start of the race, thus allowing to identify them.[23][24] Pro-United Russia candidates received 800 mln rubles (~12.5 mln USD) from funds affiliated with United Russia for their campaigns.[25] All other candidates had significantly less resources. Pro-United Russia candidates actively used outdoor advertising[26] and promoted in various media.[27]

Shortly before election day, fake "smart vote" (see below) posters with wrong candidate began to appear. For example, posters were actively distributed in constituency 15, stating that "Navalny supports candidate Ostrikov from the Communists of Russia party", while "smart vote" supported the candidate from the CPRF Savostianov.[28] Also, in some constituencies, Communist of Russia party candidates from Russia became more active, though they show no activity during most of the campaign. Their posters and agitation cubes were made as similar as possible to the posters and agitation cubes of candidates from the CPRF.

Non-system opposition[edit]

Non-system opposition figures divided in their opinion on participation in the elections.[29]

Alexei Navalny offered a "smart vote" tactic, which boils down to voting for the most popular candidate among the parliamentary opposition or the independents, in order to prevent a United Russia domination.[30][31][32][33] They marked with a (*) in the list below. The FBK has issued many anti-corruption investigations in support of the "smart vote".

Mikhail Khodorkovsky made a site with candidates' opinion on detainees during 2019 Moscow protests.[34] His site was heavily criticised due to mentioning Valeria Kasamara among the supporters of the detainees, what was seen as a hypocrisy given her support by the United Russia and Sobyanin.[35][36]

Dmitry Gudkov made a short list of worthy candidates.[37] They marked with a (¤) below.

Garry Kasparov called to boycott the elections.[38]

FBK Investigations[edit]

During the 2019 Moscow City Duma elections campaign the FBK published a lot of anti-corruption investigations against Moscow City Duma deputies from the United Russia faction, the CEC and the MCEC members and Moscow City officials. Even authorities later admitted that FBK investigations had a significant impact on protest activity and election results.[39]

On July 1, the FBK published an investigation of Andrey Metelsky's, the leader of the United Russia faction in the Moscow City Duma, property. He has been a deputy in the Moscow City Duma since 2001. His son and 75 years old mother owns hotels Maximilian (bought for 5.36 mln €), Tirolerhof (3.6 mln €), Mozart (7 mln €), Strudlhof (24 mln €) in Austria, multi-apartment complex "Lefort", built near the MosMetro station under construction Lefortovo, auto center network "Obukhov", 2 "Tanuki" restaurants, hotel "Foresta" and 4 apartments with a total area of 1700 m2 in Moscow, 3 houses in Moscow Oblast and 1 house in Kaliningrad Oblast. The total cost of his real estate in Moscow only is about 5.7 billion rubles (~ US$90 mln).[40][41]

On July 18, the FBK published an investigations of the head of the MCEC Valentin Gorbunov's property. His family owns two apartments with a total area of 200 m2 worth US$420 000 in Ika, Croatia.[42][43]

On July 22, the FBK revealed that pro-government journalist Vladimir Solovyov has an Italian permanent residency.[44][45][46]

On August 1, the FBK published an investigation of the vice-mayor Natalya Sergunina's property. Sergunina is responsible for the election process in Moscow. The FBK estimates Sergunina's (along with close relatives) undeclared real estate value at 6.5 billion rub (~ US$100 mln).[47][48]

On August 12, the FBK published an investigation of the member of the CEC Boris Ebzeev's property. His grandson at the age of 4 bought an apartment worth 500 mln rub (~ US$18.5 mln), and at the age of 7 a house in Moscow Oblast.[49][50]

On August 12, it was revealed that the MCEC member Dmitry Reut bought an apartment worth 22 mln rub (~US$0.8 mln) from the city of Moscow on unknown conditions. The cost of the apartment exceeds his income for previous years by 2 times.[51]

On August 15, the FBK published an investigation of Alexei Shaposhnikov's, the chairman of the Moscow City Duma, property. He owns an apartment in the center of Moscow with a total area of 270 m2 worth 95 mln rub (~US$1.5 mln).[52][53]

On August 20, the FBK published an investigation of Ilya Platonov's, the son of the former chairman of the Moscow City Duma Vladimir Platonov, property. He owns an apartment in the center of Moscow, on the "golden mile", with a total area of 372 m2 worth 600 mln rub (~US$9.4 mln) and a house in Moscow Oblast with total area of 4000 m2 worth 4000 mln rub (~US$62.5 mln).[54][55] The Moscow "Golden mile" is an extremely expensive part of Moscow between Ostozhenka street and Prechistenskaya embarkment, where the price of an apartment start from US$25 000 per m2.[56]

On August 22, the FBK published an investigation of Vladimir Regnatsky's, the head of Security and Anti-Corruption Department of Moscow City, property. Regnatsky is one of those officials who "approves" rallies and is responsible for their dispersing. His mother owns an apartment in the center of Moscow, on the "golden mile", with total area of 146 m2 worth 200 mln rub (~US$3.1 mln).[57][58]

On August 26, the FBK published an investigation of the vice-mayor Alexander Gorbenko's property. Along with his son and wife he owns a land plot with total area of 20 000 m2 in Moscow Oblast, where 9 houses built, worth 500 mln rub (~US$7.8 mln).[59][60]

On August 27, the FBK published an investigation of Alexander Gorbenko's children's property. His son owns an apartment in the center of Moscow with total area of 226 m2 worth 300 mln rub (~US$4.7 mln), and his daughter owns an apartment in the center of Moscow with total area of 174 m2 worth 240 mln rub (~US$3.8 mln).[61][62]

On August 29, the FBK published second investigation of Andrey Metelsky's property. He owns and manages a motorcycle shop "Alpine", while the Russian legislation prohibits deputies from doing business.[63][64]

On August 30, the FBK published an investigation of the vice-chairman of the CEC Nikolay Bulaev's property. Along with his daughter he owns 3 apartments in Moscow with total area of 392 m2 worth 220 mln rub (~US$3.4 mln).[65][66]

On September 2, the FBK published an investigation of the deputy of the Moscow City Duma Lyudmila Stebenkova's property. She owns an apartment in the center of Moscow with total area of 197 m2 worth 80 mln rub (~US$1.25 mln) and owned 1 more apartment with total area of 178 m2 which she sold in 2005.[67][68]

On September 3, the FBK published an investigation of the deputy of the Moscow City Duma Stepan Orlov's property. He received from the City of Moscow two apartments in the center of Moscow with total area of 246 m2 in exchange of his old apartment with total area of 58 m2.[69][70]

On September 4, the FBK published an investigation of the deputy of the Moscow City Duma Kirill Shchitov's property. He owns an apartment in center of Moscow, on the "golden mile", with total area of 180 m2 and one more with total area of 122 m2, and also two luxury cars.[71][68]

On September 5, the FBK published an investigation of the vice-mayor Pyotr Biryukov's property. Along with his family he owns 17 apartments in the center of Moscow, 22 luxury cars and a farm estate in Moscow Oblast total worth of 5.5 bln rub (~US$86 mln).[72][73]

On September 6, the FBK published second investigation of the vice-mayor Natalya Sergunina's property. Her daughter's husband, Aaron-Elizer Aronov, owns the "Aviapark" mall worth of 4.3 bln rub (~US$67.2 mln). Besides, the building company, belonging to Aronov, did not fulfill its social obligations to build a school and museum nearby.[74][75]

Government response to investigations[edit]

The government responded to these investigations with criminal prosecution and mass raids on the FBK offices.[76][77][78]

Results[edit]

Moscow City Duma 2019 after 100 percent counting.svg
Party Votes % Seats +/-
Communist Party 499,643 31.40 13 8px 8
United Russia 495,591 31.15 25 8px 13
A Just Russia 196,896 12.38 3 8px 3
LDPR 138,145 8.68 0 8px 1
Communists of Russia 79,062 4.97 0 8px
Yabloko 63,193 3.97 4 8px 4
Rodina 12,187 0.77 0 8px 1
The Greens 2,155 0.13 0 8px
Civilian Power 1,945 0.12 0 8px
Party of Growth 1,253 0.08 0 8px
Independents 41,802 2.63 0 8px
Valid votes 1,531,872 96.28 - -
Blank and invalid votes 59,182 3.72 - -
Total 1,591,054 100 45 8px
Registered voters/ turnout 7,308,469 21.77 - -

The results show the success of the "smart voting" strategy: none of the United Russia candidates had 50+% (in 2014 there were 16 such candidates), and only one had 45+% support. All 6 close cases, when the difference between two leading candidates was less than 600 votes, resulted in United Russia's candidate victory (constituencies 7, 9, 30, 32, 34, 36).

However, political analysts Ivan Bolshakov [ru] and Vladimir Perevalov suggest that a high assessment of this strategy is emotional rather than scientific. They conclude that the success of the opposition can be explained by the combination of two factors: the increase in protest sentiments, which reduced the electoral base of the pro-government nominees, and the decrease in the level of competition inside the opposition, due to both the “smart voting” strategy and disqualification of candidates. These factors ensured the flow of votes away from the administrative candidates and weak opposition members to the most powerful opposition candidates. “Smart voting” contributed to this victory, but did not determine the overall outcome of the elections. Its quantitative effect amounted to 5.6% of the vote. Moreover, while “smart voting” played a decisive role in the victory of several candidates, it deprived of victory approximately the same number of opposition representatives.[79][80]

Constituencies 12, 16, 24 among other candidates contained spoilers to opposition candidates with the same surnames (and even name in const. 16). In constituency 10 the surname of the candidate from Communists of Russia party is also similar to the surname of the candidate from CPRF.

By 22:30 September 9 the data input of the results was halted, and renewed only in the early morning, around 3-4 a.m. of September 10. In the constituency 15, where the leader of the United Russia's faction Andrey Metelsky tried to re-elect, the input renewed only around 5:30 a.m.[81]

The leader of the Moscow branch of CPRF Valery Rashkin stated that in constituencies 7, 25, 32, 36 victories of United Russia's candidates were caused by few (or even one) polling stations with an abnormally high percent of votes for the United Russia's candidate.[82] For example, polling station 1753, constituency 32 (Likhachev - 171, Melnikova - 930).[83] He also doubted the integrity of the electronic voting, which was practised in constituencies 1, 10 and 30, and resulted in an abnormally high percentage of votes for the United Russia's candidate.

The results for constituency 30 are suspicious not only due to electronic voting results, but also due to results in the neuropsychiatric dispensary (polling station 2047: Rusetskaya - 122, Yuneman - 6, Zhukovsky - 23), given that the final lead of Rusetskaya over Yuneman is only 84 votes.[84] Electronic voting (polling stations 5001, 5002 and 5003) results provided separately below.

Navalny stated that in constituencies 25, 32, 36 (all abnormally high percent for United Russia candidate in few polling stations), 1, 30 (both electronic voting) the victory of the non-United Russia candidate was stolen.[81]

Even given these facts, the opposition received the largest number of seats in Moscow City Duma since 1990s.[81] The "smart vote" candidates collected 586,286 votes altogether, while Pro-United Russia candidates collected 555,063 votes.[85]

31 self-promoted candidates from Communists of Russia party collected only 79062 votes altogether, though they had submitted around 160 000 signatures from voters to participate in elections.

2019 Moscow City Duma elections results[86]
Const. turnout name party result
votes %
1 24.27% Andrey Titov United Russia 16136 40.14 %
Ivan Ulyanchenko CPRF * 14165 35.24 %
Svetlana Nikituskina A Just Russia 3403 8.47 %
Olga Zhagina Communists of Russia 3332 8.29 %
Vyacheslav Milovanov LDPR 3156 7.85 %
2 20.89% Dmitry Loktev CPRF * 15091 41.37 %
Svetlana Volovets United Russia 14079 38.59 %
Andrey Petrov LDPR 3456 9.47 %
Vladislav Zhukov A Just Russia 2809 7.70 %
Pavel Rassudov self-promotion 1046 2.87 %
3 20.86% Alexander Solovyov A Just Russia * 13578 36.52 %
Sabina Tsvetkova United Russia 12795 34.42 %
Leonid Voskresensky Communists of Russia 8010 21.55 %
Yuri Shevchenko LDPR 2792 7.51 %
4 20.87% Maria Kiseleva United Russia 14835 42.74 %
Sergey Desyatkin CPRF * 12598 36.29 %
Darya Mitina Communists of Russia 3589 10.34 %
Vladimir Bessonov LDPR 2348 6.76 %
Erik Lobakh A Just Russia 1344 3.87 %
5 22.11% Roman Babayan United Russia 18524 48.74 %
Anastasia Udaltsova CPRF* 15598 41.05 %
Ksenia Domozhirova A Just Russia 2196 5.78 %
Alexei Litvinov LDPR 1685 4.43 %
6 22.51% Evgeny Bunimovich Yabloko 16732 41.90 %
Mikhail Balykhin United Russia 11449 28.66 %
Alexei Melnikov CPRF 6921 17.33 %
Natalya Krutskikh Communists of Russia 2496 6.25 %
Alexei Pochernin LDPR 2341 5.86 %
7 21.22% Nadezhda Perfilova United Russia 12909 37.02 %
Pyotr Zvyagintsev CPRF * 12772 36.63 %
Anton Verbenkin LDPR 3371 9.67 %
Pavel Kushakov A Just Russia 3132 8.98 %
Konstantin Zhukov Communists of Russia 2686 7.70 %
8 23.20% Darya Besedina Yabloko 14911 37.60 %
Vadim Kumin CPRF 12805 32.28 %
Olga Panina A Just Russia 5774 14.56 %
Ekaterina Kopeykina United Russia 2765 6.97 %
Vasily Vlasov LDPR 2153 5.43 %
Elena Lugovskaya Party of Growth 1253 3.16 %
9 21.80% Andrey Medvedev United Russia 15580 41.63 %
Nikolay Stepanov CPRF * 15067 40.26 %
Ekaterina Bakasheva Communists of Russia 2451 6.55 %
Maya Galenkina LDPR 2399 6.41 %
Alisa Goluenko A Just Russia 1928 5.15 %
10 21.35% Larisa Kartavtseva United Russia 15497 42.41 %
Yuri Dashkov CPRF * 10786 29.52 %
Andrey Suvorov A Just Russia 3894 10.66 %
Alexei Kryukov LDPR 3761 10.29 %
Igor Dashkevich Communists of Russia 2600 7.12 %
11 20.69% Nikolay Zubrilin CPRF * 15775 44.75 %
Evgeny Nifantiev United Russia 12167 34.52 %
Evgeny Rybin LDPR 4593 13.03 %
Alexander Luchin A Just Russia 2715 7.70 %
12 22.54% Alexei Shaposhnikov United Russia 14227 42.16 %
Alexander Efimov CPRF * 13087 38.78 %
Maxim Efimov LDPR 2613 7.74 %
Nikita Yankovoy A Just Russia 2358 6.98 %
Pavel Trofimov Communists of Russia 1463 4.34 %
13 21.65% Igor Buskin United Russia 11240 33.03 %
Ilya Lifantsev A Just Russia * 9028 26.53 %
Alexander Potapov CPRF 8924 26.23 %
Tatiana Kravchenko LDPR 3263 9.59 %
Denis Zommer Communists of Russia 1573 4.62 %
14 23.06% Maxim Kruglov Yabloko 15430 41.43 %
Natalya Pochinok United Russia 8939 24.00 %
Georgy Fedorov A Just Russia 5134 13.79 %
Alexander Shkolnikov self-promotion 3373 9.06 %
Evgeny Stepkin LDPR 2328 6.25 %
Dmitry Klochkov self-promotion¤ 2036 5.47 %
15 21.79% Sergey Savostianov CPRF * 12955 43.50 %
Andrey Metelsky United Russia 9790 38.25 %
Alexei Kustov LDPR 2811 9.55 %
Yuri Vostokov self-promotion 2091 7.10 %
Ivan Ostrikov Communists of Russia 1797 6.10 %
16 23.02% Mikhail Timonov A Just Russia 12293 37.57 %
Anton Molev United Russia 10419 31.85 %
Alexandra Andreeva CPRF 5855 17.90 %
Tatiana Gordienko Communists of Russia 1466 4.48 %
Vera Kosova LDPR 1395 4.26 %
Alexandra Andreeva self-promotion 1290 3.94 %
17 20.14% Viktor Maximov CPRF * 13505 48.15 %
Anastasia Tatulova United Russia 8318 29.66 %
Andrey Medvedkov A Just Russia 3580 12.76 %
Ilya Khovanets LDPR 2645 9.43 %
18 25.39% Elena Yanchuk CPRF * 15246 43.95 %
Nikolay Tabashnikov United Russia 8386 24.18 %
Anton Medvedev LDPR 4629 13.44 %
Maria Marusenko self-promotion 4516 13.82 %
Darya Shestakova A Just Russia 1912 5.51 %
19 20.83% Oleg Sheremetiev CPRF * 12172 42.11 %
Irina Nazarova United Russia 11558 39.98 %
Kirill Volkov LDPR 2955 10.22 %
Roman Ilyin Communists of Russia 2224 7.69 %
20 23.44% Evgeny Stupin CPRF * 17496 47.39 %
Maxim Shingarkin Rodina (supported by United Russia) 8512 23.05 %
Valery Danilovtsev A Just Russia 4137 11.21 %
Victor Bukreev LDPR 3664 9.92 %
Dmitry Zakharov Communists of Russia 3112 8.43 %
21 19.77% Leonid Zyuganov CPRF * 17233 60.39 %
Vera Shevchenko United Russia 5362 18.79 %
Ekaterina Borodina A Just Russia 3173 11.12 %
Andrey Shakh LDPR 2767 9.70 %
22 22.66% Inna Svyatenko United Russia 15190 46.97 %
Dmitry Saraev CPRF * 11018 34.07 %
Anton Egorov LDPR 2475 7.65 %
Dmitry Monastyrev A Just Russia 1849 5.72 %
Vladimir Badmaev Communists of Russia 1809 5.59 %
23 20.47% Elena Nikolaeva United Russia 12119 43.63 %
Elena Gulicheva CPRF * 10782 38.82 %
Georgy Pomerancev LDPR 2694 9.70 %
Anton Bulatov Communists of Russia 2183 7.85 %
24 23.07% Pavel Tarasov CPRF * 15603 40.43 %
Igor Dyagilev United Russia 13241 34.32 %
Nikolay Sheremetiev LDPR 3105 8.05 %
Anton Tarasov self-promotion 2975 7.71 %
Ekaterina Abramenko A Just Russia 2565 6.65 %
Alexei Balobutkin Communists of Russia 1095 2.84 %
25 21.70% Lyudmila Stebenkova United Russia 11600 38.83 %
Andrey Orel CPRF * 10488 35.10 %
Denis Merkulov LDPR 2967 9.94 %
Sergey Smirnov Civilian Power 1945 6.51 %
Dmitry Rakitin Communists of Russia 1344 4.50 %
Vladislav Kotsyuba A Just Russia 887 2.97 %
Stanislav Polishchuk self-promotion 642 2.15 %
26 20.14% Kirill Shchitov United Russia 10553 38.86 %
Vladimir Kalinin A Just Russia 7087 26.09 %
Andrey Ispolatov CPRF 3709 13.66 %
Svetlana Anisimova Communists of Russia 3243 11.94 %
Ilya Axenov LDPR 2567 9.45 %
27 21.64% Stepan Orlov United Russia 12943 42.82 %
Alexei Dryga CPRF * 11044 36.53 %
Sergey Korovin LDPR 2285 7.56 %
Sergey Erokhov A Just Russia 1999 6.61 %
Victor Gogolev Communists of Russia 1959 6.48 %
28 20.75% Elena Samyshina United Russia 11570 40.37 %
Arkady Pavlinov A Just Russia * 7716 26.93 %
Konstantin Lazarev CPRF 6992 24.40 %
Sergey Eliseev LDPR 2377 8.30 %
29 18.88% Oleg Artemiev United Russia 11560 43.30 %
Nikolay Sergeev CPRF * 9288 34.79 %
Boris Chernyshov LDPR 3510 13.15 %
Sergey Zhuravsky A Just Russia 2337 8.76 %
30 21.74% Margarita Rusetskaya United Russia 9645 29.46 %
Roman Yuneman self-promotion¤ 9561 29.20 %
Vladislav Zhukovsky CPRF * 8346 25.50 %
Pyotr Vikulin Communists of Russia 2641 8.07 %
Ilya Galibin LDPR 1387 4.24 %
Alexei Tsyba A Just Russia 1156 3.53 %
31 20.57% Lubov Nikitina CPRF* 13173 45.87 %
Sergey Zverev United Russia 8774 30.55 %
Andrey Mileshin Communists of Russia 2669 9.29 %
Yulia Zhandarova A Just Russia 2349 8.18 %
Yulia Shmantsar LDPR 1755 6.11 %
32 22.82% Olga Melnikova United Russia 12119 37.87 %
Klim Likhachev CPRF * 11679 36.50 %
Vladimir Bernev LDPR 2192 6.85 %
Vladimir Zalishchak A Just Russia 2192 6.85 %
Sergey Padalka "The Greens" 2155 6.73 %
Denis Kulikov Communists of Russia 1665 5.20 %
33 19.11% Lyudmila Guseva United Russia 14401 42.20 %
Levin Smirnov CPRF * 11284 33.07 %
Vladimir Grinchenko LDPR 3127 9.16 %
Pavel Fedorov Communists of Russia 2731 8.00 %
Victor Prisnyak Rodina 1451 4.25 %
Garegin Papyan A Just Russia 1132 3.32 %
34 20.06% Alexander Semennikov United Russia 11888 37.70 %
Yulia Gladkova CPRF * 11314 35.87 %
Maxim Chirkov A Just Russia 4157 13.18 %
Anton Yurikov LDPR 2106 6.68 %
Alexander Filatov Communists of Russia 2071 6.57 %
35 21.69% Natalya Metlina United Russia 13285 36.28 %
Sergey Vasiliev A Just Russia * 10754 29.37 %
Dmitry Agranovsky CPRF 4485 12.25 %
Vladimir Ryazanov Communists of Russia 3021 8.25 %
Sergey Malakhov self-promotion 2866 7.83 %
Mikhail Monakhov LDPR 2204 6.02 %
36 21.26% Olga Sharapova United Russia 10871 36.39 %
Sergey Kurgansky CPRF * 10845 36.31 %
Dmitry Repnikov LDPR 3618 12.11 %
Olesya Ryabtseva A Just Russia 2141 7.17 %
Alexei Pokataev Communists of Russia 1308 4.38 %
Artem Papeta self-promotion 1084 3.63 %
37 20.69% Nikolay Gubenko CPRF * 20621 61.65 %
Yuri Maximov LDPR 6751 20.18 %
Alexander Romanovich A Just Russia 6076 18.17 %
38 24.25% Alexander Kozlov United Russia 22021 37.75 %
Igor Glek A Just Russia 15437 26.46 %
Lyudmila Eremina CPRF 9175 15.73 %
Stanislav Smirnov LDPR 6523 11.18 %
Natalya Andrusenko Communists of Russia 5179 8.88 %
39 23.04% Valery Golovchenko United Russia 14992 37.42 %
Alexander Vidmanov CPRF * 11945 29.81 %
Andrey Bezryadov A Just Russia 4483 11.19 %
Alexander Mityaev LDPR 4374 10.91 %
Nikolay Bestaev Communists of Russia 4274 10.67 %
40 19.52% Tatiana Batysheva United Russia 13280 38.65 %
Igor Sukhanov CPRF * 11718 34.11 %
Alexander Mikhaylovsky A Just Russia 3585 10.43 %
Sergey Geraskin LDPR 2601 7.57 %
Sergey Moroz Communists of Russia 1866 5.43 %
Sergey Matveev Rodina 1308 3.81 %
41 18.74% Evgeny Gerasimov United Russia 12602 42.67 %
Olga Frolova CPRF * 10546 35.71 %
Alexei Sobolev self-promotion 2228 7.54 %
German Bogatyrenko LDPR 2154 7.30 %
Ekaterina Pavlova Communists of Russia 2002 6.78 %
42 20.83% Ekaterina Engalycheva CPRF * 14298 44.06 %
Kirill Nikitin United Russia 6948 21.41 %
Pavel Ramensky LDPR 3179 9.80 %
Boris Kagarlitsky A Just Russia 2974 9.16 %
Mikhail Menshikov self-promotion 2936 9.05 %
Olga Korshunova Communists of Russia 1203 3.70 %
Marina Kostycheva Rodina 916 2.82 %
43 24.91% Sergey Mitrokhin Yabloko 16120 46.28 %
Dmitry Koshlakov-Krestovsky LDPR 7231 20.76 %
Roman Klimentiev CPRF 6529 18.74 %
Evgeny Borovik A Just Russia 4952 14.22 %
44 23.64% Elena Shuvalova CPRF * 16710 46.47 %
Ilya Sviridov A Just Russia (supported by United Russia) 15738 43.77 %
Nadezhda Shalimova self-promotion 1793 4.99 %
Ekaterina Nechaeva LDPR 1714 4.77 %
45 22.93% Magomet Yandiev A Just Russia * 12942 41.16 %
Valeria Kasamara United Russia 11014 35.03 %
Evegeny Turushev LDPR 4124 13.11 %
Mikhail Konev self-promotion 3365 10.70 %
2019 Moscow City Duma electronic voting results[86]
Const. turnout name party result
votes %
1 Andrey Titov United Russia 1923 52.92 %
Ivan Ulyanchenko CPRF * 1058 29.11 %
Svetlana Nikituskina A Just Russia 247 6.8 %
Vyacheslav Milovanov LDPR 218 6.0 %
Olga Zhagina Communists of Russia 218 5.17 %
10 Larisa Kartavtseva United Russia 2124 55.91%
Yuri Dashkov CPRF * 776 20.43 %
Andrey Suvorov A Just Russia 368 9.67 %
Alexei Kryukov LDPR 299 7.87 %
Igor Dashkevich Communists of Russia 232 6.11 %
30 Margarita Rusetskaya United Russia 1120 47.12 %
Vladislav Zhukovsky CPRF * 465 19.56 %
Roman Yuneman self-promotion¤ 455 19.14 %
Pyotr Vikulin Communists of Russia 174 7.32 %
Ilya Galibin LDPR 85 3.58 %
Alexei Tsyba A Just Russia 78 3.28 %

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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