2019 Pacific typhoon season

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2019 Pacific typhoon season
2019 Pacific typhoon season summary.png
Season summary map
Seasonal boundaries
First system formedDecember 31, 2018
Last system dissipatedSeason ongoing
Strongest storm
NameWutip
 • Maximum winds120 km/h (75 mph)
(10-minute sustained)
 • Lowest pressure975 hPa (mbar)
Seasonal statistics
Total depressions3
Total storms2
Typhoons1
Super typhoons0 (unofficial)
Total fatalities17 total
Total damage$151.2 million (2019 USD)
Related articles
Pacific typhoon seasons
2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021

The 2019 Pacific typhoon season is an ongoing event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season runs throughout 2019, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Pabuk, developed on January 1, becoming the earliest-forming tropical storm of the western Pacific Ocean on record, breaking the previous record held by Typhoon Alice in 1979.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean to the north of the equator between 100°E and 180th meridian. Within the northwestern Pacific Ocean, there are two separate agencies that assign names to tropical cyclones which can often result in a cyclone having two names. The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) will name a tropical cyclone should it be judged to have 10-minute sustained wind speeds of at least 65 km/h (40 mph) anywhere in the basin, whilst the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones which move into or form as a tropical depression in their area of responsibility located between 135°E and 115°E and between 5°N–25°N regardless of whether or not a tropical cyclone has already been given a name by the JMA. Tropical depressions that are monitored by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) are given a number with a "W" suffix.

Seasonal forecasts[edit]

During the year several national meteorological services and scientific agencies forecast how many tropical cyclones, tropical storms, and typhoons will form during a season and/or how many tropical cyclones will affect a particular country. These agencies included the Tropical Storm Risk (TSR) Consortium of University College London, PAGASA and Taiwan's Central Weather Bureau.

Season summary[edit]

The season started with Tropical Storm Pabuk active to the east of the Thailand, becoming the earliest-forming tropical storm of the western Pacific Ocean on record, breaking the previous record held by Typhoon Alice in 1979.. Over the course of three days, the system crossed over to the North Indian Ocean. A weak tropical depression was named Amang by PAGASA but quickly degenerated into a remnant low. Severe Tropical Storm Wutip developed on February 18.

Systems[edit]

Tropical Storm Pabuk[edit]

Tropical storm (JMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Pabuk 2019-01-04 0640Z.jpg Pabuk 2019 track.png
DurationDecember 31, 2018 – January 4, 2019 (Exited basin)
Peak intensity85 km/h (50 mph) (10-min)  994 hPa (mbar)

A tropical disturbance formed over the southern portion of the South China Sea on December 28, 2018,[1] and it absorbed the remnants of Tropical Depression 35W (Usman) on December 30.[2] Under high vertical wind shear, the low-pressure area remained disorganized until December 31 when it was upgraded to a tropical depression by both the JMA and the JTWC.[3] As it was designated 36W by the JTWC, it was unofficially the last system of the 2018 typhoon season.[4] At around 06:00 UTC on January 1, 2019, the system was upgraded to the first tropical storm of the 2019 typhoon season and named Pabuk by the JMA, surpassing Typhoon Alice in 1979 to become the earliest-forming tropical storm of the northwest Pacific Ocean on record.[5] At that time, Pabuk was about 650 km (405 miles) southeast of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam and drifted westward slowly with a partially exposed low-level circulation center.[6]

Under marginal conditions including warm sea surface temperatures, excellent poleward outflow but strong vertical wind shear, Pabuk struggled to intensify further for over two days until it accelerated west-northwestward and entered the Gulf of Thailand on January 3, where vertical wind shear was slightly weaker. It became the first tropical storm over the gulf since Muifa in 2004. Moreover, it tried to form an eye revealed by microwave imagery.[7] On January 4, the Thai Meteorological Department reported that Pabuk had made landfall over Pak Phanang, Nakhon Si Thammarat at 12:45 ICT (05:45 UTC), although other agencies indicated a landfall at peak intensity between 06:00 and 12:00 UTC.[8] Pabuk became the first tropical storm to make landfall over southern Thailand since Linda in 1997. Shortly after 12:00 UTC, the JMA issued the last full advisory for Pabuk as it exited the basin.[9][10]

One of the islands in the south of Thailand, Koh Samui, appeared to have been spared much of the brunt of the storm with no confirmed deaths. Beaches were closed, but even with the bad weather approaching, tourists on the popular island in the Gulf of Thailand continued to visit bars and restaurants catering to them.[11]

In Vietnam, Pabuk caused one death,[12] and the losses were estimated at 27.87 billion (US$1.2 million).[13] Eight people in Thailand were killed,[14] and the estimated losses in the country were estimated about US$150 million.[15] Pabuk also killed one person in Malaysia.[16]

Tropical Depression 01W (Amang)[edit]

Tropical depression (JMA)
Tropical depression (SSHWS)
01W 2019-01-19 0518Z.jpg Amang 2019 track.png
DurationJanuary 4 – January 22
Peak intensity55 km/h (35 mph) (10-min)  1004 hPa (mbar)

The JTWC upgraded a disturbance north of Bairiki to a tropical depression with the designation 01W late on January 4 and expected some intensification,[17] but it failed to develop and the JTWC downgraded it back to a disturbance on January 6.[18] The system continued drifting westwards for two weeks without development. On January 19, the JMA upgraded the low-pressure area to a tropical depression when it was already located about 200 km (120 mi) west of Palau.[19]

The depression indirectly triggered landslides and flash floods in Davao Oriental, killing 7 and leaving 2 missing. Financial losses were at PH₱2.73 million (US$51,800).[20]

Typhoon Wutip[edit]

WutipTY
Current storm status
Typhoon  (JMA)
Current storm status
Category 1 typhoon (1-min mean)
Wutip Geostationary VIS-IR 2019.png
Satellite image
JTWC wp0219.gif
Forecast map
As of:00:00 UTC, February 21
Location:6°06′N 150°30′E / 6.1°N 150.5°E / 6.1; 150.5 (Wutip)
Sustained winds:120 km/h; 75 mph (10-min mean)
120 km/h; 75 mph (1-min mean)
gusting to 175 km/h; 110 mph
Pressure:975 hPa (28.79 inHg)
Movement:WNW at 12 kn (22 km/h; 14 mph)
See more detailed information.

A low pressure area formed just south of the Marshall Islands on February 16. It then began to gradually organize while moving westward just south of Federated States of Micronesia. It was upgraded to a tropical depression by the JMA on February 18, with the JTWC following suit the following day.

Current storm information[edit]

As of 00:00 UTC on February 21, Typhoon Wutip is located near 6.1°N 150.5°E. Maximum 10-minute sustained winds are at 65 knots (120 km/h; 75 mph), while maximum 1-minute sustained winds are at 65 knots (120 km/h; 75 mph), with gusts to 75 knots (140 km/h; 85 mph). The minimum central barometric pressure is 975 hPa (28.79 inHg), and the system is moving westnorthwest at 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph)

For the latest official information, see:

Storm names[edit]

Within the Northwest Pacific Ocean, both the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) and the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assign names to tropical cyclones that develop in the Western Pacific, which can result in a tropical cyclone having two names.[21] The Japan Meteorological Agency's RSMC Tokyo — Typhoon Center assigns international names to tropical cyclones on behalf of the World Meteorological Organization's Typhoon Committee, should they be judged to have 10-minute sustained windspeeds of 65 km/h (40 mph).[22] PAGASA names to tropical cyclones which move into or form as a tropical depression in their area of responsibility located between 135°E and 115°E and between 5°N and 25°N even if the cyclone has had an international name assigned to it.[21] The names of significant tropical cyclones are retired, by both PAGASA and the Typhoon Committee.[22] Should the list of names for the Philippine region be exhausted then names will be taken from an auxiliary list of which the first ten are published each season. Unused names are marked in gray.

International names[edit]

A tropical cyclone is named when it is judged to have 10-minute sustained windspeeds of 65 km/h (40 mph).[23] The JMA selected the names from a list of 140 names, that had been developed by the 14 members nations and territories of the ESCAP/WMO Typhoon Committee.[24] Retired names, if any, will be announced by the WMO in 2020; though replacement names will be announced in 2021. The next 28 names on the naming list are listed here along with their international numeric designation, if they are used.

  • Pabuk (1901)
  • Wutip (1902) (active)
  • Sepat (unused)
  • Mun (unused)
  • Danas (unused)
  • Nari (unused)
  • Wipha (unused)
  • Francisco (unused)
  • Lekima (unused)
  • Krosa (unused)
  • Bailu (unused)
  • Podul (unused)
  • Lingling (unused)
  • Kajiki (unused)
  • Faxai (unused)
  • Peipah (unused)
  • Tapah (unused)
  • Mitag (unused)
  • Hagibis (unused)
  • Neoguri (unused)
  • Bualoi (unused)
  • Matmo (unused)
  • Halong (unused)
  • Nakri (unused)
  • Fengshen (unused)
  • Kalmaegi (unused)
  • Fung-wong (unused)
  • Kammuri (unused)

Philippines[edit]

This season, PAGASA will use its own naming scheme, that will either develop within or move into their self-defined area of responsibility.[25] The names were taken from a list of names, that was last used during 2015 and are scheduled to be used again during 2023.[25] All of the names are the same except Liwayway and Nimfa, which replaced the names Lando and Nona after it was retired.[25]

  • Amang
  • Betty (unused)
  • Chedeng (unused)
  • Dodong (unused)
  • Egay (unused)
  • Falcon (unused)
  • Goring (unused)
  • Hanna (unused)
  • Ineng (unused)
  • Jenny (unused)
  • Kabayan (unused)
  • Liwayway (unused)
  • Marilyn (unused)
  • Nimfa (unused)
  • Onyok (unused)
  • Perla (unused)
  • Quiel (unused)
  • Ramon (unused)
  • Sarah (unused)
  • Tisoy (unused)
  • Ursula (unused)
  • Viring (unused)
  • Weng (unused)
  • Yoyoy (unused)
  • Zigzag (unused)
Auxiliary list


  • Abe (unused)
  • Berto (unused)
  • Charo (unused)
  • Dado (unused)
  • Estoy (unused)
  • Felion (unused)
  • Gening (unused)
  • Herman (unused)
  • Irma (unused)
  • Jaime (unused)

Season effects[edit]

This table summarizes all the systems that developed within or moved into the North Pacific Ocean, to the west of the International Date Line during 2019. The tables also provide an overview of a systems intensity, duration, land areas affected and any deaths or damages associated with the system.

Name Dates active Peak classification Sustained
wind speeds
Pressure Areas affected Damage
(USD)
Deaths Refs
Pabuk December 31, 2018 – January 4, 2019 Tropical storm 85 km/h (50 mph) 994 hPa (29.35 inHg) Natuna Islands, Vietnam, Malaysia, Thailand, Myanmar $151 million 10 [12][14][15][16]
01W (Amang) January 4 – 22 Tropical depression 55 km/h (35 mph) 1004 hPa (29.65 inHg) Palau, Philippines $51.8 thousand 7 [26]
Wutip February 18 – Present Typhoon 120 km/h (75 mph) 975 hPa (28.79 inHg) Caroline Islands None None
Season aggregates
3 systems December 31, 2018 –
Season ongoing
120 km/h (75 mph) 975 hPa (28.79 inHg) $151 million 17


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "97W INVEST". United States Naval Research Laboratory. 28 December 2018. Archived from the original on 28 December 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2019.
  2. ^ "Tropical Depression 35W (Thirtyfive) Warning Nr 023". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. 30 December 2018. Archived from the original on 1 January 2019. Retrieved 1 January 2019.
  3. ^ "WTPQ20 RJTD 310600 RSMC Tropical Cyclone Advisory". Japan Meteorological Agency. 31 December 2018. Archived from the original on 1 January 2019. Retrieved 1 January 2019.
  4. ^ "Prognostic Reasoning for Tropical Depression 36W (Thirtysix) Warning Nr 001". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. 31 December 2018. Archived from the original on 1 January 2019. Retrieved 1 January 2019.
  5. ^ "WTPQ20 RJTD 010600 RSMC Tropical Cyclone Advisory". Japan Meteorological Agency. 1 January 2019. Archived from the original on 1 January 2019. Retrieved 1 January 2019.
  6. ^ "Prognostic Reasoning for Tropical Depression 36W (Thirtysix) Warning Nr 005". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. 1 January 2019. Archived from the original on 1 January 2019. Retrieved 1 January 2019.
  7. ^ "JTWC/36W/#16/01-04 00Z Prognostic Reasoning". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. 4 January 2019. Archived from the original on 4 January 2019. Retrieved 6 January 2019.
  8. ^ "Weather Warning "Tropical Storm "PABUK"" No. 18 Time Issued January 4, 2019". Thai Meteorological Department. 4 January 2019. Archived from the original on 6 January 2019. Retrieved 6 January 2019.
  9. ^ "WTPQ20 RJTD 041200 RSMC Tropical Cyclone Advisory". Japan Meteorological Agency. 4 January 2019. Archived from the original on 6 January 2019. Retrieved 6 January 2019.
  10. ^ "WTPQ30 RJTD 041200 RSMC Tropical Cyclone Prognostic Reasoning Reasoning No.18 for TS 1901 Pabuk (1901)". Japan Meteorological Agency. 4 January 2019. Archived from the original on 6 January 2019. Retrieved 6 January 2019.
  11. ^ Tropical Storm Pabuk hits Thailand's beaches with rain and surging seas (Report). telegraph. January 5, 2019. Retrieved January 9, 2019.
  12. ^ a b "Bão số 1 áp sát miền Tây: Sập nhà, 1 người chết" (in Vietnamese). VietNamNet. January 4, 2019. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  13. ^ Trương, Huyền (January 6, 2019). "Hậu quả do bão số 1: Còn 2 người mất tích, thiệt hại ước tính 30 tỷ đồng" (in Vietnamese). Báo Kinh Tế Đô Thị. Retrieved January 6, 2019.
  14. ^ a b Panpetch, Sumeth (January 3, 2019). "Thailand braces for powerful storm at southern beach towns". Associated Press. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  15. ^ a b "Thai preparedness limits Pabuk damage". The Thaiger. January 11, 2019. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  16. ^ a b "罔顧「帕布」風暴來襲警報2男子冒險出海遇巨浪釀1死" (in Chinese). Oriental Daily News. January 4, 2019. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  17. ^ "Tropical Depression 01W (One) Warning Nr 001". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. 4 January 2019. Archived from the original on 8 January 2019. Retrieved 8 January 2019.
  18. ^ "Tropical Depression 01W (One) Warning Nr 008". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. 6 January 2019. Archived from the original on 8 January 2019. Retrieved 8 January 2019.
  19. ^ "WWJP25 RJTD 190600". Japan Meteorological Agency. 19 January 2019. Archived from the original on 19 January 2019. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  20. ^ NDRRMC Update: Sitrep No. 03 re Flashflood and Landslide Incidents in Davao Oriental Province (Region XI) (pdf) (Report). NDRRMC. January 26, 2019. Retrieved January 26, 2019.
  21. ^ a b Padgett, Gary. "Monthly Tropical Cyclone Summary December 1999". Australian Severe Weather. Archived from the original on August 28, 2012. Retrieved October 1, 2013.
  22. ^ a b The Typhoon Committee (February 21, 2013). "Typhoon Committee Operational Manual 2013". World Meteorological Organization. pp. 37–38. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 28, 2012. Retrieved October 1, 2013.
  23. ^ "REVIEW OF THE 2015 TYPHOON SEASON (submitted by the RSMC Tokyo – Typhoon Center)" (PDF). Typhooncommittee.org. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  24. ^ Zhou, Xiao; Lei, Xiaotu (2012). "Summary of retired typhoons within the Western North Pacific Ocean". Tropical Cyclone Research and Review. The Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific/World Meteorological Organization's Typhoon Committee. 1 (1): 23–32. doi:10.6057/2012TCRR01.03. ISSN 2225-6032. Retrieved December 21, 2014.
  25. ^ a b c "Philippine Tropical Cyclone Names". Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  26. ^ Dalizon, Alfred P. (January 24, 2019). "Landslide buries 7 treasure hunters in Agusan del Norte". People's Journal. Retrieved January 25, 2019.

External links[edit]