2019 in sumo

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The following are the events in professional sumo during 2019.

Tournaments[edit]

Hatsu basho[edit]

Ryōgoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 13 January – 27 January[1]

2019 Hatsu basho results - Makuuchi Division
Result East Rank West Result
0 - 3 - 12 ø Japan Kisenosato Y ø Mongolia Hakuho 10 - 3 - 2
2 - 3 - 10 ø Mongolia Kakuryu Y ø 0 - 0 - 0
9 - 6 - 0 Japan Takayasu O Japan Goeido 9 - 6 - 0
0 - 0 - 0 ø O ø Georgia (country) Tochinoshin 0 - 4 - 11
11 - 4 - 0 Japan Takekeisho S Mongolia Tamawashi 13 - 2 - 0
5 - 10 - 0 Japan Myogiryu K Japan Mitakeumi 8 - 4 - 3
6 - 9 - 0 Japan Tochiozan M1 Mongolia Ichinojo 6 - 9 - 0
7 - 8 - 0 Japan Nishikigi M2 Japan Hokutofuji 9 - 6 - 0
7 - 8 - 0 Japan Shodai M3 Japan Shohozan 5 - 10 - 0
6 - 9 - 0 Japan Kotoshogiku M4 Japan Okinoumi 7 - 8 - 0
7 - 8 - 0 Bulgaria Aoiyama M5 Japan Yoshikaze 3 - 12 - 0
8 - 7 - 0 Japan Chiyotairyu M6 Japan Onosho 8 - 7 - 0
6 - 9 - 0 Japan Ryuden M7 Japan Daieisho 9 - 6 - 0
10 - 5 - 0 Brazil Kaisei M8 Japan Asanoyama 8 - 7 - 0
0 - 0 - 15 ø Mongolia Takanoiwa M9 Japan Endo 10 - 5 - 0
9 - 6 - 0 Japan Takarafuji M10 Japan Abi 10 - 5 - 0
9 - 6 - 0 Japan Sadanoumi M11 Japan Ikioi 9 - 6 - 0
6 - 9 - 0 Japan Kagayaki M12 Japan Meisei 8 - 7 - 0
9 - 6 - 0 Japan Yago M13 ø Japan Kotoyuki 4 - 7 - 4
6 - 9 - 0 Japan Yutakayama M14 Mongolia Chiyoshoma 6 - 9 - 0
8 - 3 - 4 ø Japan Chiyonokuni M15 Japan Kotoeko 7 - 8 - 0
4 - 11 - 0 Japan Daiamami M16 Japan Daishomaru 3 - 12 - 0
ø - Indicates a pull-out or absent rank
winning record in bold
Yusho Winner

Haru basho[edit]

Osaka Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka, 10 March – 24 March[1]

2019 Haru basho results - Makuuchi Division
Result East Rank West Result
15 - 0 - 0 Mongolia Hakuho Y Mongolia Kakuryu 10 - 5 - 0
10 - 5 - 0 Japan Takayasu O Japan Goeido 12 - 3 - 0
7 - 8 - 0 Georgia (country) Tochinoshin O ø 0 - 0 - 0
10 - 5 - 0 Japan Takekeisho S Mongolia Tamawashi 5 - 10 - 0
7 - 8 - 0 Japan Mitakeumi K Japan Hokutofuji 7 - 8 - 0
3 - 12 - 0 Brazil Kaisei M1 Japan Endo 7 - 8 - 0
7 - 8 - 0 Japan Daieisho M2 Japan Myogiryu 6 - 9 - 0
4 - 11 - 0 Japan Nishikigi M3 Japan Shodai 5 - 10 - 0
3 - 12 - 0 Japan Tochiozan M4 Mongolia Ichinojo 14 - 1 - 0
8 - 7 - 0 Japan Chiyotairyu M5 Japan Onosho 5 - 10 - 0
8 - 7 - 0 Japan Okinoumi M6 Japan Abi 8 - 7 - 0
12 - 3 - 0 Bulgaria Aoiyama M7 Japan Takarafuji 8 - 7 - 0
7 - 8 - 0 Japan Asanoyama M8 Japan Kotoshogiku 11 - 4 - 0
5 - 10 - 0 Japan Sadanoumi M9 Japan Ikioi 2 - 13 - 0
7 - 8 - 0 Japan Shohozan M10 Japan Yago 6 - 9 - 0
10 - 5 - 0 Japan Ryuden M11 Japan Meisei 9 - 6 - 0
0 - 0 - 15 ø Japan Chiyonokuni M12 Japan Yoshikaze 10 - 5 - 0
9 - 6 - 0 Japan Tomokaze M13 Japan Kagayaki 9 - 6 - 0
6 - 9 - 0 Japan Terutsuyoshi M14 Japan Toyonoshima 5 - 10 - 0
6 - 9 - 0 Japan Ishiura M15 Japan Kotoeko 7 - 8 - 0
7 - 8 - 0 Mongolia Daishoho M16 Japan Yutakayama 3 - 12 - 0
7 - 8 - 0 Mongolia Chiyoshoma M17 0 - 0 - 0
ø - Indicates a pull-out or absent rank
winning record in bold
Yusho Winner

Natsu basho[edit]

Ryōgoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 12 May – 26 May[1]

2019 Hatsu basho results
Result East Rank West Result
0 - 0 - 15 ø Mongolia Hakuhō Y Mongolia Kakuryū 11 - 4 - 0
9 - 6 - 0 Japan Gōeidō O Japan Takayasu 9 - 6 - 0
3 - 4 - 8 Japan Takakeishō O ø 0 - 0 - 0
5 - 7 - 3 Mongolia Ichinojō S Georgia (country) Tochinoshin 10 - 5 - 0
6 - 9 - 0 Bulgaria Aoiyama K Japan Mitakeumi 9 - 6 - 0
7 - 8 - 0 Japan Hokutōfuji M1 Japan Kotoshōgiku 6 - 9 - 0
7 - 8 - 0 Japan Endō M2 Japan Daieishō 7 - 8 - 0
6 - 9 - 0 Japan Chiyotairyū M3 Mongolia Tamawashi 10 - 5 - 0
5 - 10 - 0 Japan Okinoumi M4 Japan Abi 10 - 5 - 0
6 - 9 - 0 Japan Myōgiryū M5 Japan Ryūden 10 - 5 - 0
8 - 7 - 0 Japan Takarafuji M6 Japan Yoshikaze 4 - 11 - 0
10 - 5 - 0 Japan Shōdai M7 Japan Meisei 10 - 5 - 0
3 - 5 - 7 ø Brazil Kaisei M8 Japan Asanoyama 12 - 3 - 0
5 - 10 - 0 Japan Nishikigi M9 Japan Tomokaze 8 - 7 - 0
5 - 10 - 0 Japan Kagayaki M10 Japan Ōnoshō 8 - 7 - 0
8 - 7 - 0 Japan Shōhōzan M11 Japan Tochiōzan 6 - 9 - 0
10 - 5 - 0 Japan Shimanoumi M12 Japan Yago 6 - 9 - 0
7 - 8 - 0 Japan Chiyomaru M13 Japan Sadanoumi 7 - 8 - 0
4 - 11 - 0 Japan Tokoshōryū M14 Japan Enho 7 - 8 - 0
6 - 9 - 0 Japan Terutsuyoshi M15 Japan Kotoekō 8 - 7 - 0
9 - 6 - 0 Mongolia Daishoho M16 Japan Ishiura 5 - 10 - 0
5 - 10 - 0 Mongolia Chiyoshōma M17 0 - 0 - 0
ø - Indicates a pull-out or absent rank
winning record in bold
Yusho Winner

Nagoya basho[edit]

Aichi Prefectural Gymnasium, Nagoya, 7 July – 21 July[1]

Aki basho[edit]

Ryōgoku Kokugikan, Tokyo, 8 September – 22 September[1]

Kyushu basho[edit]

Fukuoka Kokusai Center, Kyushu, 10 November – 24 November[1]

News[edit]

January[edit]

  • 7: In a series of practice bouts held in front of the Yokozuna Deliberation Council, all three yokozuna participate. Kisenosato goes 1–3 against Kakuryū and 2–0 against Gōeidō, while Hakuhō wins all five of his bouts against November 2018 tournament winner Takakeishō.[2]
  • 16: After suffering three straight losses in the Hatsu tournament, Kisenosato announces his retirement. He had been unable to recover from a left arm injury sustained in the March 2017 tournament, which caused him to miss or withdraw from eight consecutive tournaments from May 2017 to July 2018. His record as a yokozuna was 36 wins against 35 losses, with 97 bouts missed. He is staying in sumo as a coach under the Araiso elder name.[3]
  • 18: Kakuryū pulls out with a recurrence of his ankle problem.[4]
  • 20: Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko attend Day 8, the 23rd and last time before the Emperor's abdication in April that they have watched sumo in an official capacity.[5]
  • 26: Hakuho withdraws with knee and ankle injuries, meaning all three yokozuna have failed to complete 15 days for the second tournament in a row.[6]
  • 27: Sekiwake Tamawashi is the surprise tournament champion with a 13–2 record, sealing his first yusho by defeating Endō on the final day.[7] At 34 he is the second oldest first-time yusho winner in the six tournaments per year era (post-1958), after 37 year-old Kyokutenhō in 2012.[7] Takakeisho could have taken part in a playoff if Tamawashi had lost and he had won, but in the event he finished two wins behind on 11–4 after losing to Gōeidō. That defeat, and a 9–6 record in September 2018, means he will not be promoted to ōzeki despite winning 33 bouts in three tournaments and being the sole runner-up here.[8] Tamawashi receives special prizes for Outstanding Performance and Fighting Spirit, while Takakeisho wins the Technique Award.[8] Mitakeumi is awarded a share of the Outstanding Performance Prize for defeating all three yokozuna and Tamawashi despite missing some of the tournament through injury.[8] The jūryō division championship is won by Shimanoumi.
  • 30: Promotions to the jūryō division for the forthcoming March tournament are announced. Returning are Daiseidō [ja] and Takanofuji [ja] (who changed his shikona from Takayoshitoshi in January). There are two newcomers – Michinoku stable's Kiribayama from Mongolia, and Arashio stable's Wakamotoharu. The latter has two brothers in sumo, one of whom (Wakatakatage) is already in jūryō. This means there will be three sets of brothers in the jūryō division in March (Hidenoumi and Tobizaru [ja], and Takanofuji and Takagenji [ja] being the others).


February[edit]

  • 9: The 52nd NHK charity ozumo tournament is held at the Kokugikan.
  • 10: The 43rd Fuji TV one day tournament is held at the Kokugikan. Takayasu defeats Yoshikaze in the final. (Hakuho is knocked out in the second round.)

March[edit]

  • 24: The Haru tournament in Osaka concludes with Hakuhō defeating his rival yokozuna Kakuryū with a shitatenage underarm throw to clinch his 42nd career championship and his 15th with a perfect 15–0 score. His victory means he has won at least one tournament every year since 2006.[9] However, he injures his right arm in the process and is seen holding the bicep afterwards. He finishes one win ahead of maegashira Ichinojō, who did not get to fight the yokozuna during the tournament. His 14–1 runner-up performance is recognized with the Outstanding Performance prize. Sekiwake Takakeishō not only wins the Technique Award but also promotion to ōzeki, after he defeats Tochinoshin to finish on 10–5, giving him 34 wins over the last three tournaments. Tochinoshin, conversely, is demoted from ōzeki after two consecutive make-koshi or losing records. The Fighting Spirit Prize goes to maegashira Aoiyama for his fine 12–3 record. In the jūryō division Shimanoumi wins his second championship in a row and is guaranteed promotion to the top division for the first time in May at the age of 29. Down in the jonidan division former ōzeki Terunofuji, long sidelined by injuries, loses a playoff for the division championship after both he and fellow Mongolian Roga finish with perfect 7–0 records. It is Terunofuji's first appearance since May 2018. Former maegashira Tenkaiho retires and becomes Hidenoyama Oyakata.
  • 27:Promotions to jūryō are announced. They are newcomer Irodori and two returnees, Irodori’s Shikoroyama stablemate Seirō and Haru’s makushita yusho winner Churanoumi.
  • 28: Hakuhō and his stablemaster Miyagino are summoned by the Sumo Association to explain why Hakuhō led the crowd in a display of sanbon-jime hand-clapping after his victory speech on Sunday, seen as a breach of etiquette because it preceded the kami-okuri ceremony that concludes the tournament.[10] Hakuhō had wanted to acknowledge Emperor Akihito, as it was the final tournament of the Heisei era. Hakuhō was also criticized in November 2017 when he led the crowd in cheers in the midst of the Harumafuji assault affair.[10]
  • 31: The spring regional tour begins with a tournament in the Ise Shrine. Hakuhō performs the dohyō-iri but does not participate in any bouts due to his injury, confirmed a muscle tear in the upper right arm.[11]

April[edit]

The spring regional tour visits the following locations:[12]


  • 12:It is reported that the Sumo Association are arranging for President of the United States Donald Trump to visit on the final day of the May tournament as part of his trip to Japan, after hearing of his request to watch a bout.[14]
  • 12: Wakaimonogashira Hakuryū [ja] turns 65 and retires. As a wrestler from the Kagamiyama stable he spent 47 tournaments in jūryō, a record for someone who never made the top makuuchi division (his highest rank was jūryō 1). He is being replaced by the former jūryō wrestler Hitenryū [ja] who retired in March.
  • 24: Hakuhō is given an official reprimand, the lightest of the seven punishments available, in response to the sanbon-jime incident on the last day of the March tournament. His stablemaster Miyagino is given a salary cut of ten percent for three months.[15]
  • 30: On the last day of the Heisei era, the banzuke for the May tournament is published, with Takakeishō listed as ōzeki for the first time.[16] There are two newcomers to the top division, Shimanoumi [ja] and Enhō [ja]. Some 50kg lighter, and 15cm shorter, than the average top division wrestler, Enhō is the first sekitori from Kanazawa Gakuin University.[17]

May[edit]

Asanoyama receives the President's Cup from Donald Trump
  • 1: Dressed in their black montsuki hakama, 69 of the 70 sekitori use their bodies to spell out the kanji for the new imperial era, Reiwa.[13]
  • 14: Further reports on President Donald Trump's visit on the final day of the May tournament suggest he will present a custom-made trophy to the winner, the "Trump Cup."[18]
  • 26: Donald Trump is in attendance for the final five matches of the final day of the May tournament.[19] He presents the new trophy, officially called the President's Cup,[20] to the winner of the championship, maegashira Asanoyama, who finishes with a 12-3 record and special prizes for Outstanding Performance and Fighting Spirit. He is the first winner without any previous sanyaku experience since Sadanoyama in 1961.[21] He finshes one win ahead of Kakuryū (11-4). Tochinoshin, despite a controversial call by the judges in his Day 13 match with Asanoyama which reversed the referee's decision and declared that his heel had stepped out of the ring, finishes with a 10-5 record, enough to return him immediately to the ōzeki rank. Other notable performers are Abi and top division debutant Shimanoumi who share the Fighting Spirit prize with Asanoyama, and Ryūden who wins the Technique prize.[22] The jūryō division championship is won by Takagenji with a 13-2 record. Among the retirements are former jūryō wrestlers Dewahayate and Tochiryu.
  • 29:Promotions to jūryō for the Nagoya tournament in July are announced. There are four newcomers, including the son of Sadogatake Oyaktata (ex-sekiwake Kotonowaka) who will be changing his shikona from Kotokamatani to that of his father. There is one returnee, Takanofuji, who won the makushita championship with a perfect 7-0 record.

Deaths[edit]

  • 10 February: The 60th Yokozuna Futahaguro, aged 55, of chronic kidney disease (not reported until 29 March).[23]
  • 14 February: Former maegashira Tokitsunada, aged 49, of heart failure.
  • 6 April: Former jūryō Saigo [ja], aged 43, of a suspected heart attack.[24]
  • 20 April: Former maegashira Kiyonomori, also former Kise Oyakata, aged 84, of pneumonia.[25]
  • 25 April: Former sekiwake Kurohimeyama, also former Tatekuma Oyakata, aged 70, of pneumonia.[26]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Grand Tournament Schedule". Japan Sumo Association. Retrieved 26 December 2018.
  2. ^ "Sumo: Kisenosato slow but steady in practice for New Year meet". The Mainichi. 7 January 2019. Archived from the original on 7 January 2019. Retrieved 7 January 2019.
  3. ^ "SUMO/ Persistence leads Kisenosato to the top—and then to early retirement". Asahi Shimbun. 16 January 2019. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  4. ^ "Kakuryu pulls out of New Year Basho with ankle injury". Japan Times. 18 January 2019. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  5. ^ "Emperor and Empress watch grand sumo". NHK World. 20 January 2019. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
  6. ^ "Hakuho withdraws from New Year Basho on penultimate day". Japan Times. 26 January 2019. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  7. ^ a b "SUMO/ Sekiwake Tamawashi clinches his first career title at 34". Asahi Shimbun. 27 January 2019. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  8. ^ a b c "Tamawashi secures first title by beating Endo on final day". Japan Times. 27 January 2019. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  9. ^ "Injury looms over Hakuho's triumph". Japan Times. 25 March 2019. Retrieved 25 March 2019.
  10. ^ a b "Sumo: Hakuho called on carpet for unapproved cheer leading". Kyodo News. 28 March 2019. Archived from the original on 28 March 2019. Retrieved 28 March 2019.
  11. ^ "Hakuho reveals muscle tear in upper right arm". Japan Times. 31 March 2019. Retrieved 1 April 2019.
  12. ^ "2019 Spring Tour Schedule". Japan Sumo Association. Archived from the original on 1 April 2019. Retrieved 1 April 2019.
  13. ^ a b "Sumo wrestlers make beefy salute to first day of Japan's new era". Japan Times. 1 May 2019. Retrieved 2 May 2019.
  14. ^ "Japan Sumo Association lays groundwork for Trump visit". Japan Times. 12 April 2019. Retrieved 12 April 2019.
  15. ^ "Sumo Yokozuna Hakuho punished over impromptu cheer following tournament win". The Mainichi. 24 April 2019. Retrieved 24 April 2019.
  16. ^ "Takakeisho set for ozeki debut". Japan Times. 30 April 2019. Retrieved 30 April 2019.
  17. ^ Gunning, John (1 May 2019). "Pint-size Enho could shake up banzuke in Reiwa era". Japan Times. Retrieved 2 May 2019.
  18. ^ Nakamura, David (13 May 2019). "In Japan, a new award for the grand sumo champion: The 'Trump Cup'". Washington Post. Retrieved 15 May 2019.
  19. ^ "Trump attends sumo; gives President's Cup to winner Asanoyama". Japan Today. 26 May 2019. Archived from the original on 29 May 2019. Retrieved 29 May 2019.
  20. ^ "Trump watches 'incredible' sumo wrestling in Japan". Yahoo/Reuters. 26 May 2019. Retrieved 29 May 2019.
  21. ^ "SUMO/ Lowly wrestler takes sumo championship on 14th day". Asahi Shimbun. 25 May 2019. Retrieved 29 May 2019.
  22. ^ "Asanoyama falls on basho's last day". Japan Times. 26 May 2019. Retrieved 29 May 2019.
  23. ^ "Ex-yokozuna Futahaguro died in February at age 55, wife announces". Japan Times. 30 March 2019. Retrieved 4 April 2019.
  24. ^ "元十両の彩豪・墨谷一義さん死去 不整脈で発作か" (in Japanese). Nikkan Sports. 7 April 2019. Retrieved 8 April 2019.
  25. ^ "元幕内清ノ森の檀崎政夫さん死去、84歳 誤嚥性肺炎のため" (in Japanese). Sanspo. 13 May 2019. Retrieved 14 May 2019.
  26. ^ 「デゴイチ」元関脇黒姫山が肺炎のため死去 70歳. Nikkan Sports (in Japanese). 26 April 2019. Retrieved 26 April 2019.