2020 New Hampshire Republican primary

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2020 New Hampshire Republican primary

← 2016 February 11, 2020 2024 →

22 pledged delegates
  Donald Trump official portrait (cropped).jpg William Weld in 2016.jpg
Candidate Donald Trump Bill Weld
Home state Florida[1] Massachusetts
Delegate count 22 0
Popular vote 129,734[2] 13,844
Percentage 84.4% 9.0%

2020NHGOPprimary.svg
2020NHGOPpresidentialprimarybytown.png
2020NHGOPpresidentialCDprimary.svg
  Donald Trump
  Write-ins
  N/A

The 2020 New Hampshire Republican primary took place on Tuesday, February 11, 2020, as the second nominating contest in the Republican Party presidential primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the Iowa caucuses the week before.[3] The New Hampshire primary is a semi-closed primary, meaning that only Republicans and independents may vote in this primary.

Incumbent president Donald Trump won the primary with 84.4 percent of the vote, clinching all of the state's 22 pledged delegates to the national convention. Despite Bill Weld winning 9% of the vote, President Trump received the most votes (129,734) in the New Hampshire primary for an incumbent candidate in U.S. history, moving past the previous recordholder, Bill Clinton, in 1996 (76,797).[4]

Procedure[edit]

The state's ballot access laws have been traditionally lenient, with prospective presidential candidates only required to pay a $1,000 fee to secure a line on the primary ballot.[5]

Primary elections are scheduled to be held on Tuesday, February 11, 2020, with the vast majority of polling places closed by 7 p.m. and 13 cities allowed to close at 8 p.m. In this semi-closed Republican primary, candidates must meet a viability threshold of 10 percent at the statewide level in order to be considered viable. New Hampshire's pledged delegates to the 2020 Republican National Convention are then allocated proportionally on the basis of the results of the primary.[6]

Candidates on the ballot[edit]

The following candidates are on the ballot, and listed in order of filing:[7]

  • Rocky De La Fuente, California
  • Rick Kraft, New Mexico
  • Donald Trump, Florida[1]
  • Star Locke, Texas
  • Robert Ardini, New York
  • Eric Merrill, New Hampshire
  • Stephen B. Comley, Sr., Massachusetts
  • Bob Ely, Illinois
  • Zoltan Istvan, California
  • Matthew John Matern, California
  • "President" R. Boddie, Georgia
  • Larry Horn, Oregon
  • Bill Weld, Massachusetts
  • Juan Payne, Alabama
  • Joe Walsh, Illinois
  • William N. Murphy, New Hampshire
  • Mary Maxwell, New Hampshire

Campaign[edit]

All the major candidates, as well as many minor ones, had events in the state starting in 2018.

The famous Lesser-known candidates' forum took place on January 28, the latest it's ever been held.[8] Robert Ardini, President R. Boddie, Stephen Comley, Zoltan Istvan, Mary Maxwell, and Bill Murphy participated.

Polling[edit]

Results[edit]

Traditionally, the top three or four candidates of the other major party receive a large number of write-in votes.

county
County won by these popular vote results:
  Trump—85–90%
  Trump—80–85%
congressional district
Congressional district won by these popular vote results:
  Trump—80–85%
2020 New Hampshire Republican primary[9][10]
Candidate Votes % Estimated
delegates
Donald Trump 129,734 84.4 22
Bill Weld 13,844 9.0 0
Write-ins 1,746 1.1 0
Pete Buttigieg (write in) 1,116 0.7 0
Amy Klobuchar (write in) 1,076 0.7 0
Mary Maxwell 929 0.6 0
Joe Walsh (withdrawn) 838 0.5 0
Mike Bloomberg (write in) 801 0.5 0
Bernie Sanders (write in) 753 0.5 0
Mitt Romney (write in) 632 0.4 0
Eric Merrill 524 0.3 0
William N. Murphy 447 0.3 0
Matthew John Matern 268 0.2 0
Stephen B. Comley 202 0.1 0
Rocky De La Fuente 148 0.1 0
Rick Kraft 109 0.1 0
Juan Payne 83 0.1 0
President R. Boddie 72 0.1 0
Robert Ardini 77 0.1 0
Bob Ely 68 0.0 0
Larry Horn 65 0.0 0
Star Locke 66 0.0 0
Zoltan Istvan 56 0.0 0
Total 153,654 100% 22

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Matthew Choi (October 31, 2019). "Trump, a symbol of New York, is officially a Floridian now". Politico. Retrieved February 3, 2020.
  2. ^ https://sos.nh.gov/nhsos_content.aspx?id=8589996914&terms=2020%20republican
  3. ^ Picket, Kerry (September 8, 2019). "GOP won't cancel New Hampshire primary to help Trump, Gov. Chris Sununu says". Washington Examiner.
  4. ^ https://transition.fec.gov/pubrec/fe1996/presprim.htm#nh . Retrieved 15 February 2020
  5. ^ "New Hampshire Election Laws, 655:48 Fees". New Hampshire Secretary of State. 2017. Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  6. ^ "New Hampshire Republican Delegation 2020". The Green Papers. Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  7. ^ "Content - NHSOS". sos.nh.gov.
  8. ^ https://www.unionleader.com/news/politics/voters/lesser-known-presidential-candidates-to-speak-at-saint-anselm/article_2b759fe6-e24f-53a7-a6fd-882aa3a70ae1.html
  9. ^ "2020 Presidential Primary - Republican Write-Ins - NHSOS". sos.nh.gov. Retrieved 2020-02-17.
  10. ^ "Content - NHSOS". sos.nh.gov. Retrieved 2020-02-17.