2020 North Carolina judicial elections

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At least three justices of the seven-member North Carolina Supreme Court and five judges of the 15-member North Carolina Court of Appeals will be elected by North Carolina voters on November 3, 2020, concurrently with other state elections. Terms for seats on each court are eight years. These elections are conducted on a partisan basis.

Incumbent Court of Appeals Judges Linda McGee and Wanda Bryant (both Democrats), did not reopen their campaign accounts with the State Board of Elections, indicating they would not run for re-election,[1] and they did not file for re-election by the time filing closed on Dec. 20, 2019.[2]

Only one candidate from each party filed for each seat, meaning that no party primary elections would be necessary.

Supreme Court (Chief Justice seat)[edit]

Chief Justice Mark Martin, a Republican, announced his resignation in 2019, triggering an election for his seat in 2020. Governor Roy Cooper appointed Associate Justice Cheri Beasley, a Democrat, to become Chief Justice through 2020.[3]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Supreme Court (Newby seat/Seat 2)[edit]

The seat currently held by Associate Justice Paul Newby is up for election in 2020. Newby has announced that he would run for Chief Justice instead, leaving his Associate Justice seat open.[5]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Supreme Court (Davis seat/Seat 4)[edit]

Beasley's elevation to the position of Chief Justice made her Associate Justice seat vacant, which also triggered a 2020 election. Governor Cooper appointed Court of Appeals Judge Mark A. Davis to fill the vacancy as an Associate Justice.[8]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Court of Appeals (Seat 4)[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

  • Tricia Shields (Democrat), attorney and Campbell University Law School instructor[1]
  • April C. Wood (Republican), North Carolina District Court Judge[1]

Court of Appeals (Seat 5)[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Court of Appeals (Seat 6)[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

  • Chris Dillon (Republican), incumbent Court of Appeals Judge
  • Gray Styers (Democrat), attorney[1]

Court of Appeals (Seat 7)[edit]

Judge Reuben Young, a Democrat, was appointed by Gov. Roy Cooper to fill a vacancy, through the end of 2020, and is eligible to run for a full term.

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Court of Appeals (Seat 13)[edit]

Judge Christopher Brook, a Democrat, was appointed by Gov. Roy Cooper to fill a vacancy, through the end of 2020, and is eligible to run for a full term.

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

  • Christopher Brook (Democrat), incumbent Court of Appeals Judge[2]
  • Jefferson G. Griffin (Republican), North Carolina District Court Judge[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g News & Observer
  2. ^ a b c d State Board of Elections: State candidate list by county
  3. ^ "Cheri Beasley Announced as First Black Female Chief Justice in NC History". Spectrum News. February 12, 2019.
  4. ^ Bonner, Lynn; Thompson, Elizabeth (March 10, 2019). "Who's running in North Carolina's 2020 statewide races?". The News & Observer.
  5. ^ a b "Newby to seek Chief Justice seat in 2020". North State Journal. January 25, 2019.
  6. ^ Doran, Will (January 28, 2019). "Phil Berger Jr., son of powerful Republican lawmaker, wants seat on NC Supreme Court". The News & Observer. Retrieved September 16, 2019.
  7. ^ Doran, Will (January 30, 2019). "Democratic judge Lucy Inman announces 2020 campaign for NC Supreme Court seat". The News & Observer. Retrieved September 16, 2019.
  8. ^ "Gov. Cooper Names Supreme Court Associate Justice". North Carolina Governor. March 11, 2019.
  9. ^ Doran, Will (February 5, 2019). "Former state senator Tamara Barringer of Cary to seek NC Supreme Court seat". The News & Observer. Retrieved September 16, 2019.
  10. ^ "Cooper elevates Court of Appeals judge to Supreme Court". WCTI 12. Associated Press. March 11, 2019.