2020 Summer Olympics

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Games of the XXXII Olympiad
2020 Summer Olympics logo.svg
Host city Tokyo, Japan
Motto Discover Tomorrow
未来(あした)をつかもう ('Ashita o tsukamō')[1]
Opening ceremony 24 July
Closing ceremony 9 August
Stadium National Olympic Stadium

The 2020 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXXII Olympiad (第三十二回オリンピック競技大会 Dai Sanjūni-kai Orinpikku Kyōgi Taikai) and commonly known as Tokyo 2020, is a major international multi-sport event due to be celebrated in the tradition of the Olympic Games as governed by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). The games are planned to be held from 24 July – 9 August 2020 in Tokyo, Japan. Tokyo was announced as the host city at the 125th IOC Session in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on 7 September 2013.[2] Tokyo previously hosted the 1964 Summer Olympic Games, and in 2020 will become the fifth city (and the first city in Asia) to host the Summer Olympic Games more than once. Tokyo will also be hosting the 2020 Summer Paralympics.

Bidding[edit]

Tokyo, Istanbul and Madrid were the three candidate cities. The applicant cities of Baku and Doha were not promoted to candidate status. A bid from Rome was withdrawn.

Vote[edit]

48 votes needed for selection in opening round & runoff; 49 in final round.

Main article: 125th IOC Session

The IOC voted to select the host city of the 2020 Summer Olympics on 7 September 2013 at the 125th IOC Session at the Buenos Aires Hilton in Buenos Aires, Argentina. An exhaustive ballot system was used. No city won over 50% of the votes in the first round, and Madrid and Istanbul were tied for second place. A run-off vote between these two cities was held to determine which would be eliminated. In the final vote, a head-to-head contest between Tokyo and Istanbul, Tokyo was selected by 60 votes to 36.

2020 Summer Olympics host city election[3]
City NOC name Round 1 Runoff Round 2
Tokyo  Japan 42 60
Istanbul  Turkey 26 49 36
Madrid  Spain 26 45

Development and preparation[edit]

The Tokyo metropolitan government set aside a fund of ¥400 billion Japanese yen (over $3 billion USD) to cover the cost of hosting the Games. The Japanese government is considering increasing slot capacity at both Haneda Airport and Narita Airport by easing airspace restrictions. A new railway line is planned to link both airports through an expansion of Tokyo Station, cutting travel time from Tokyo Station to Haneda from 30 minutes to 18 minutes, and from Tokyo Station to Narita from 55 minutes to 36 minutes; the line would cost ¥400 billion yen and would be funded primarily by private investors. But East JR is planning a new route near Tamachi to Haneda Airport.[4] Funding is also planned to accelerate completion of the Central Circular Route, Tokyo Gaikan Expressway and Ken-Ō Expressway, and to refurbish other major expressways in the area.[5] There are also plans to extend the Yurikamome automated transit line from its existing terminal at Toyosu Station to a new terminal at Kachidoki Station, passing the site of the Olympic Village, although the Yurikamome would still not have adequate capacity to serve major events in the Odaiba area on its own.[6]

The Organizing Committee is headed by former Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori.[7] Olympic and Paralympic Minister Toshiaki Endo is overseeing the preparations on behalf of the Japanese government.[8]

Sports[edit]

Following the 2012 Games, the IOC assessed the 26 sports held in London, with the remit of selecting 25 'core' sports to join new entrants golf and rugby sevens at the 2020 Games. In effect, this would involve the dropping of one sport from the 2016 Games program. This would leave a single vacancy in the 2020 Games program, which the IOC would seek to fill from a shortlist containing seven unrepresented sports and the removed sport. Events such as modern pentathlon, taekwondo and badminton were among those considered vulnerable.

On 12 February 2013, IOC leaders voted to drop wrestling from the Olympic program, a surprise decision that removed one of the oldest Olympic sports from the 2020 Games. Wrestling, which combines freestyle and Greco-Roman events, goes back to the inaugural modern Olympics in Athens in 1896,[9] and even further to the Ancient Olympic Games. The decision to drop wrestling was opposed in many countries and by their NOCs.[10][11][12][13] Wrestling therefore joined eight other sports in a short list applying for inclusion in the 2020 Games.[14]

The final vote took place in September 2013; three sports made the final shortlist; squash, baseball/softball, and wrestling. Six other sports (bowling, karate, roller sports, sport climbing, surfing, and wushu) were excluded from consideration at this point. On 8 September at the 125th IOC Session, the IOC selected wrestling to be included in the Olympic program for 2020 and 2024. Wrestling secured 49 votes, while baseball/softball secured 24 votes and squash got 22 votes.[15]

Under new IOC policies that shift the Games to an "event-based" programme rather than sport-based, the host organizing committee can now also propose the addition of sports to the programme—with a particular focus on adding sports that are popular in the host country. As a result of these changes, a new shortlist of eight sports were unveiled in June 2015 for a vote in August 2015. These sports include baseball/softball, bowling, karate, roller sports, sport climbing, squash, surfing, and wushu.[16][17]

Calendar[edit]

All dates are JST (UTC+9)

This calendar is adapted from the candidature file.[18]

OC Opening ceremony Event competitions 1 Gold medals CC Closing ceremony
July / August 22
Wed
23
Thu
24
Fri
25
Sat
26
Sun
27
Mon
28
Tue
29
Wed
30
Thu
31
Fri
1
Sat
2
Sun
3
Mon
4
Tue
5
Wed
6
Thu
7
Fri
8
Sat
9
Sun
Gold medals
Ceremonies OC CC
Archery 1 1 1 1 4
Athletics 2 2 4 6 6 5 6 7 8 1 47
Badminton 1 2 2 5
Basketball 1 1 2
Boxing 3 5 5 13
Canoeing 1 1 2 16
Cycling 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 3 2 1 1 18
Diving 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8
Equestrian 2 1 1 1 1 6
Fencing 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 10
Field hockey 1 1 2
Football 1 1 2
Golf 1 1 2
Gymnastics 1 1 1 1 5 5 18
Handball 1 1 2
Judo 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 14
Modern pentathlon 1 1 2
Rowing 3 3 4 4 14
Rugby sevens 2 2
Sailing 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 10
Shooting 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 1 15
Swimming 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 34
Synchronized swimming 1 1 2
Table tennis 2 3 5
Taekwondo 2 2 2 2 8
Tennis 2 3 4
Triathlon 1 1 2
Volleyball 1 1 1 1 4
Water polo 1 1 2
Weightlifting 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 15
Wrestling 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 3 18
Total gold medals 0 0 0 11 16 16 21 19 19 23 21 25 20 19 15 23 17 30 11 306
Cumulative total 0 0 0 11 27 43 64 83 102 125 146 171 191 210 225 248 265 295 306
July / August 22
Wed
23
Thu
24
Fri
25
Sat
26
Sun
27
Mon
28
Tue
29
Wed
30
Thu
31
Fri
1
Sat
2
Sun
3
Mon
4
Tue
5
Wed
6
Thu
7
Fri
8
Sat
9
Sun
Gold medals


Venues[edit]

The Tokyo Big Sight Conference Tower would be used as the International Broadcast Center
View of the Rainbow Bridge from Odaiba Marine Park
The Wakasu Olympic Marina, where Sailing will be held

It was confirmed in February 2012 that the National Olympic Stadium in Tokyo would receive a $1 billion upgrade and full–scale reconstruction for the 2019 Rugby World Cup as well as the 2020 Olympics.[19] As a result, a design competition for the new stadium was launched. In November 2012 the Japan Sport Council announced that out of 46 finalists, Zaha Hadid Architects was awarded the design for the new stadium. Plans included dismantling the original stadium, and expanding the capacity from 50,000 to a modern Olympic capacity of about 80,000.[20] However, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced in July 2015 that plans to build the new National Stadium would be scrapped and rebid on amid public discontent over the stadium's building costs.[21]

28 of the 33 competition venues in Tokyo are within 8 kilometres (5 miles) of the Olympic Village. 11 new venues are to be constructed.[22]

Heritage Zone[edit]

Seven venues will be located within the central business area of Tokyo, northwest of the Olympic Village. Several of these venues were also used for the 1964 Summer Olympics.

Tokyo Bay Zone[edit]

20 venues will be located in the vicinity of Tokyo Bay, southeast of the Olympic Village, predominantly on Ariake, Odaiba and the surrounding artificial islands.

Sites farther than 8 km (5 miles) from the Olympic Village[edit]

Football venues[edit]

The Sapporo Dome in Sapporo

Non-competition venues[edit]

Marketing[edit]

Emblem[edit]

The official emblem of the 2020 Summer Olympics and Paralympics were unveiled on 24 July 2015. The logo resembles a stylized "T"; a red circle in the top-right corner represents a beating heart, the flag of Japan, and an "inclusive world", and a black column in the centre represents diversity.[29]

Shortly after the unveiling, allegations of plagiarism surfaced; Belgian graphics designer Olivier Debie pointed out that the emblem, without the circle in the top-right, used a similar layout and shapes as a logo he had designed for the Théâtre de Liège. The emblem's designer, Kenjiro Sano, did not comment. Tokyo's organizing committee denied that the emblem design was plagiarized, arguing that the design had gone through "long, extensive and international" intellectual property examinations before it was cleared for use.[30][31]

Media[edit]

Sponsors[edit]

As of 2015 total sponsorship for the 2020 Games reached approx. $1.5 billion, setting an Olympics record (in contrast, the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing attracted only $1.3 billion).[32]

Worldwide Olympic Partners[edit]

The Gold Partners[edit]

The Official Partners[edit]

Broadcasting[edit]

In the United States, the 2020 Summer Olympics will be broadcast by NBC, as part of a US$4.38 billion agreement that began at the 2014 Winter Olympics.[33]

In Europe, these will be the first Summer Olympics under the IOC's exclusive pan-European rights deal with Discovery Communications, which began at the 2018 Winter Olympics. The rights for the 2020 Games cover almost all of Europe, excluding Russia, as well as France and the United Kingdom due to pre-existing rights deals that will expire following these Games, thus marking the BBC's and France Télévisions' final Olympics. Discovery will sub-license coverage to free-to-air networks in each territory.[34][35][36]

Below are the confirmed television right holders:

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "国際スローガン “Discover Tomorrow” 並びにルックプログラムを発表". 
  2. ^ "Olympics 2020: Tokyo wins race to host Games". BBC. 7 September 2013. Retrieved 23 September 2013. 
  3. ^ "2020 Olympics Vote Total Box". Associated Press. Miami Herald. 7 September 2013. Retrieved 8 September 2013. 
  4. ^ JR東日本、東京五輪を前に都心部と羽田空港結ぶ新路線整備を on YouTube
  5. ^ "羽田・成田発着を拡大、五輪へインフラ整備急ぐ". 日本経済新聞. 10 September 2013. Retrieved 10 September 2013. 
  6. ^ "五輪で東京に1000万人 過密都市ゆえの課題多く". 日本経済新聞. 10 September 2013. Retrieved 10 September 2013. 
  7. ^ PST (24 January 2014). "Mori heads Tokyo 2020 organizing committee - Yahoo Sports". Sports.yahoo.com. Retrieved 4 February 2014. 
  8. ^ http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2015/06/25/national/toshiaki-endo-appointed-olympics-minister/ Toshiaki Endo appointed Olympics minister]
  9. ^ Wilson, Stephen. "IOC Drops Wrestling From 2020 Olympics". ABC News (U.S.). Associated Press. Retrieved 2 December 2013. 
  10. ^ Supron odesłał medal IO na znak protestu - Sporty walki - www.orange.pl
  11. ^ Staff (14 February 2013). "IOC drops wrestling from 2020 Olympics". ESPN. Retrieved 7 March 2013. 
  12. ^ Gallagher, Jack (6 March 2013). "Wrestlers promote Tokyo's 2020 Olympic bid". Yahoo! Sports. Retrieved 7 March 2013. 
  13. ^ Staff (3 March 2013). "Bulgaria's wrestling coach starts hunger strike". USA Today. Retrieved 7 March 2013. 
  14. ^ Olympic Games: Snooker misses out on 2020 Tokyo place
  15. ^ "Wrestling added to Olympic programme for 2020 and 2024 Games". IOC. 8 September 2013. Retrieved 8 September 2013. 
  16. ^ "Olympic Agenda 2020 Recommendations" (PDF). IOC. Retrieved 23 June 2015. 
  17. ^ "Olympic Games: Snooker misses out on 2020 Tokyo place". BBC Sport. Retrieved 23 June 2015. 
  18. ^ "Candidature file for the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics" (PDF). p. 8-9. Retrieved 9 September 2013. 
  19. ^ Super Bowl Ads; Japan National Stadium Upgrade; Contador Banned
  20. ^ New National Stadium design announced, boosting Tokyo Olympic bid
  21. ^ Himmer, Alastair (17 July 2015). "Japan rips up 2020 Olympic stadium plans to start anew". news.yahoo.com. AFP. Retrieved 17 July 2015. 
  22. ^ "Tokyo 2020 candidature file - section 8 - Sports and Venues" (PDF). Tokyo 2020. Retrieved 10 September 2013. 
  23. ^ Originally to be held at Water Polo Arena in Koto, Tokyo; venue moved in June 2015. "東京五輪、26競技の会場決定 自転車・サッカー除き". Nihon Keizai Shimbun. 9 June 2015. Retrieved 9 June 2015. 
  24. ^ Badminton originally to be held at Youth Plaza Arena; venue moved in June 2015. "東京五輪、26競技の会場決定 自転車・サッカー除き". Nihon Keizai Shimbun. 9 June 2015. Retrieved 9 June 2015. 
  25. ^ Rugby sevens originally to be held at National Olympic Stadium; venue moved in June 2015. "東京五輪、26競技の会場決定 自転車・サッカー除き". Nihon Keizai Shimbun. 9 June 2015. Retrieved 9 June 2015. 
  26. ^ Originally to be held at Youth Plaza Arena; proposal for venue change to Saitama Super Arena in late 2014 was confirmed in March 2015 by the IOC. "IOC supports Tokyo’s plans to relocate Olympic venues". The Japan Times. 19 November 2014. Retrieved 10 June 2015.  "Moving 2020 hoops to Saitama latest blow for game". The Japan Times. 3 March 2015. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  27. ^ Originally to be held at Wakasu Olympic Marina; venue moved in June 2015. "東京五輪、26競技の会場決定 自転車・サッカー除き". Nihon Keizai Shimbun. 9 June 2015. Retrieved 9 June 2015. 
  28. ^ All three events originally to be held at Tokyo Big Sight; venue moved in June 2015. "東京五輪、26競技の会場決定 自転車・サッカー除き". Nihon Keizai Shimbun. 9 June 2015. Retrieved 9 June 2015. 
  29. ^ "Tokyo 2020 unveils official emblem with five years to go". Olympic.org. Retrieved 27 July 2015. 
  30. ^ "Tokyo Olympic Games logo embroiled in plagiarism row". The Guardian. 30 July 2015. Retrieved 1 August 2015. 
  31. ^ "Tokyo Olympics emblem said to look similar to Belgian theater logo". The Japan Times. 30 July 2015. Retrieved 2015-07-30. 
  32. ^ Fukase, Atsuko (15 April 2015). "2020 Tokyo Olympics Attract Record Sponsorship". The Wall Street Journal Japan Real Time. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  33. ^ McCarthy, Michael (7 June 2011). "NBC wins U.S. TV rights to four Olympic Games through 2020". USA Today. 
  34. ^ "IOC awards European broadcast rights to SPORTFIVE". ESPN. 18 February 2009. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  35. ^ "Discovery Lands European Olympic Rights Through ’24". Sports Business Journal. Retrieved 1 July 2015. 
  36. ^ "BBC dealt another blow after losing control of TV rights for Olympics". The Guardian. Retrieved 30 June 2015. 
  37. ^ "IOC awards 2018-2024 broadcast rights in Asia". International Olympic Committee (Olympic.org). 29 July 2015. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  38. ^ "Seven Network reclaims rights to broadcast Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro in 2016 and Tokyo in 2020". News.com.au. 9 July 2014. Retrieved 9 July 2014. 
  39. ^ "IOC awards 2018-2020 broadcast rights in Canada". International Olympic Committee (Olympic.org). 28 October 2014. Retrieved 29 October 2014. 
  40. ^ "CBC Joins with Bell, Rogers to Deliver 2018, 2020 Olympics". sportscastermagazine. 28 October 2014. Retrieved 28 October 2014. 
  41. ^ "IOC awards 2018-2024 broadcast rights in China". International Olympic Committee (Olympic.org). 4 December 2014. Retrieved 4 December 2014. 
  42. ^ "IOC awards all TV and multiplatform broadcast rights in Europe to Discovery and Eurosport for 2018-2024 Olympic Games". International Olympic Committee (Olympic.org). 29 June 2015. Retrieved 29 June 2015. 
  43. ^ "IOC awards TV rights in Germany, Korea, France". USA Today. 5 July 2011. Retrieved 27 March 2012. 
  44. ^ Kennedy, Mike (16 June 2015). "France Télévisions in Canal Plus sub-licensing deal". SportsPro. Retrieved 17 June 2015. 
  45. ^ "IOC awards 2018-2024 broadcast rights in Japan". International Olympic Committee (Olympic.org). 19 June 2014. Retrieved 19 June 2014. 
  46. ^ "IOC awards 2018-2024 broadcast rights in Middle East and North Africa". International Olympic Committee (Olympic.org). 27 July 2015. Retrieved 27 July 2015. 
  47. ^ a b "IOC awards SBS broadcast rights for 2018, 2020, 2022 and 2024 Olympic Games". Olympic.org. 4 July 2011. Retrieved 18 August 2011. 
  48. ^ "IOC awards broadcast rights in United Kingdom for 2014, 2016, 2018 and 2020 Olympic Games to the BBC". Olympic.org. 18 July 2012. Retrieved 18 July 2012. 
  49. ^ "IOC awards US broadcast rights for 2014, 2016, 2018 and 2020 Olympic Games to NBCUniversal". Olympic.org. 7 June 2011. Retrieved 8 June 2011. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Rio de Janeiro
Summer Olympic Games
Tokyo

XXXII Olympiad (2020)
Succeeded by
TBA