2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →

All 36 Texas seats to the United States House of Representatives
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 23 13

The 2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas will be held on November 3, 2020, to elect the 36 U.S. Representatives from the state of Texas, one from each of the state's 36 congressional districts. The elections will coincide with the 2020 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections.

Contents

District 1[edit]

The 1st district encompasses Deep East Texas, taking in Tyler, Lufkin, Nacogdoches, Longview, and Marshall. The incumbent is Republican Louie Gohmert, who was re-elected with 72.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Hank Gilbert, rancher and businessman[4]

District 2[edit]

The 2nd district is based in northern and western Houston. The incumbent is Republican Dan Crenshaw, who was elected with 52.8% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Declined[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Dan Crenshaw (R)
Organizations

District 3[edit]

The 3rd district is based in the suburbs north and northeast of Dallas, encompassing a large portion of Collin County including McKinney, Plano, and Frisco, as well as Collin County's share of Dallas itself. The incumbent is Republican Van Taylor, who was elected with 54.2% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Tanner Do, activist and insurance adjuster[2]
  • Sean McCaffity, trial attorney[11]
  • Lulu Seikaly, attorney[12]
Withdrawn[edit]

District 4[edit]

The 4th district encompasses Northeastern Texas taking in counties along the Red River and spreading to the parts of the northeastern exurbs of the Dallas–Fort Worth metro area. The incumbent is Republican John Ratcliffe, who was elected with 75.7% of the vote in 2018.[1] Ratcliffe was nominated by President Trump to succeed Dan Coats as the DNI.[15] President Trump withdrew his nomination on August 2, 2019.[16]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Russell Foster, IT technician[18]

District 5[edit]

The 5th district takes in the eastern edge of Dallas, as well as the surrounding rural areas. The incumbent is Republican Lance Gooden, who was elected with 62.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

District 6[edit]

The 6th district takes in parts of Arlington and rural areas south of Dallas including Ellis County. The incumbent is Republican Ron Wright, who was elected with 53.1% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Stephen Daniel, attorney[21]

District 7[edit]

The 7th district covers western Houston and its suburbs. The incumbent is Democrat Lizzie Fletcher, who flipped the district and was elected with 52.5% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Declined[edit]

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Lizzie
Pannill Fletcher (D)
Wesley
Hunt (R)
Undecided
TargetPoint Consulting (R)[A] August 10–11, 2019 336 ± 5.3% 43% 45%

District 8[edit]

The 8th district encompasses the suburbs and exurbs north of Houston, taking in Spring, The Woodlands, Conroe, and Huntsville. The incumbent is Republican Kevin Brady, who was re-elected with 73.4% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Kevin Brady, incumbent U.S. Representative[29]
  • Melissa Esparza-Mathis, U.S. Army veteran[30]
  • Kirk Osborn, consultant[2]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Elizabeth Hernandez, accounts payable associate[31]
  • Laura Jones, realtor[31]

District 9[edit]

The 9th district encompasses southwestern Houston. The incumbent is Democrat Al Green, who was re-elected with 89.1% of the vote in 2018, without major-party opposition.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Al Green, incumbent U.S. Representative[2]
  • Melissa Wilson-Williams, real estate broker[2]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Al Austin, retiree[2]
  • Julian Martinez, auto repairman[2]
  • Jon Menefee, IT consultant[2]
  • Johnny Teague, rancher[2]

District 10[edit]

The 10th district stretches from northwest Harris County to northern Austin and Pflugerville. The incumbent is Republican Michael McCaul, who was re-elected with 51.1% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Mike Siegel
Organizations
Shannon Hutcheson
Organizations

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Shannon
Hutcheson (D)
Michael
McCaul (R)
Undecided
Remington Research (R)[A] November 6–7, 2019 848 ± 3.4% 41% 50% 9%

District 11[edit]

The 11th district is based in midwestern Texas, including Lamesa, Midland, Odessa, San Angelo, Granbury, and Brownwood. The incumbent is Republican Mike Conaway, who was re-elected with 80.1% of the vote in 2018,[1] subsequently announced he would not seek re-election on July 31, 2019.[40]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Gene Barber, U.S. Army veteran[2]
  • Brandon Batch, businessman[41]
  • Jamie Berryhill, businessman and founder of Mission Messiah Women & Children's Program[42]
  • Cynthia J. Breyman, banker[31]
  • J.D. Faircloth, former mayor of Midland[43]
  • Casey Gray, U.S. Navy Veteran / Army veteran / CIA Officer[2]
  • J. Ross Lacy, Midland city councilman[44]
  • Ned Luscombe, registered nurse[2]
  • August Pfluger, former national security advisor to President Donald Trump and U.S. Air Force veteran[45]
  • Robert Tucker, retiree[2]
  • Wesley Virdell, U.S. Air Force Veteran and businessman[46]
Declined[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Jon Mark Hogg, lawyer[46]

Third parties[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Jeffery Cady (Independent)[46]
  • Wacey Alpha Cody (Libertarian), competitive horse rider[50]

Endorsements[edit]

August Pfluger (R)
Organizations

District 12[edit]

The 12th district is located in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex, and takes in Parker County and western Tarrant County, including parts of Fort Worth and its inner suburbs of North Richland Hills, Saginaw, and Haltom City. The incumbent is Republican Kay Granger, who was re-elected with 64.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Kay Granger
U.S. Presidents
Organizations

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Danny Anderson, aircraft assembler[2]
  • Lisa Welch, college professor[56]

Third parties[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Trey Holcomb (Libertarian), conservative activist, educator and former high school football and baseball coach

District 13[edit]

The 13th district encompasses most of the Texas Panhandle, containing the cities of Amarillo and Wichita Falls. The incumbent is Republican Mac Thornberry, who was re-elected with 81.5% of the vote in 2018.[1] On September 30, 2019, Thornberry announced he would not be seeking re-election.[57]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrew[edit]
  • Kevin McInturff, non-profit worker[72]
Declined[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Chris Ekstrom
Organizations
Federal politicians

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Third parties[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

District 14[edit]

The 14th district takes in the southern and southeastern region of Greater Houston, including Galveston, Jefferson County and southern Brazoria County. The incumbent is Republican Randy Weber, who was re-elected with 59.2% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Adrienne Bell
Organizations

District 15[edit]

The 15th district stretches from McAllen in the Rio Grande Valley, northward into rural counties in the Greater San Antonio area. The incumbent is Democrat Vicente González, who was re-elected with 59.7% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

District 16[edit]

The 16th district is located entirely within El Paso County, taking in El Paso, Horizon City, and Anthony. The incumbent is Democrat Veronica Escobar, who was elected with 68.5% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Anthony Aguero, videographer[88]
  • Irene Armendariz-Jackson, realtor[88]
  • Jaime Arriola Jr., nurse[88]
  • Patrick Cigarruista, financial advisor[88]
  • Samuel Williams, Retired Military[88]

District 17[edit]

The 17th district covers parts of suburban north Austin stretching to rural central Texas, including Waco and Bryan-College Station. The incumbent is Republican Bill Flores, who was re-elected with 56.8% of the vote in 2018.[1] On September 4, 2019, Flores announced that he will not be running for re-election to spend more time with his family.[89]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Potential[edit]
Declined[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Third parties[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Ted Brown (Libertarian), small business owner and insurance claims adjuster

District 18[edit]

The 18th district is based in Downtown Houston and takes in the heavily black areas of Central Houston. The incumbent is Democrat Sheila Jackson Lee, who was re-elected with 75.3% of the vote in 2018 without major-party opposition.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Michael Allen, landscape architect[2]
  • Donovan Boson, public administrator[2]
  • Marc Flores, construction manager[2]
  • Jerry Ford Sr., businessman[2]
  • Sheila Jackson Lee, incumbent U.S. Representative[2]
  • Stevens Orozco, activist[101]
  • Bimal Patel, optometrist[2]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Robert Cadena, businessman[2]
  • Wendell Champion, attorney and U.S Army veteran[2]
  • Nellie Heiksell, minister[2]
  • T.C. Manning, service technician[2]
  • Nathan Milliron, attorney[2]
  • Ava Reynero Pate, candidate for Texas's 18th congressional district in 2016 and 2018[2]

District 19[edit]

The 19th district encompasses rural West Texas, taking in Lubbock. The incumbent is Republican Jodey Arrington, who was re-elected with 75.2% of the vote in 2018 without major-party opposition.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Tom Watson, attorney[102]

District 20[edit]

The 20th district encompasses downtown San Antonio. The incumbent is Democrat Joaquin Castro, who was re-elected with 80.9% of the vote in 2018 without major-party opposition.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

District 21[edit]

The 21st district extends from north San Antonio to central and south Austin, taking in rural parts of the Texas Hill Country. The incumbent is Republican Chip Roy, who was elected with 50.2% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Declined[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Wendy Davis (D)
Organizations
Chip Roy (R)
U.S. federal officials
U.S. senators
U.S. representatives
State officials
Individuals
Organizations

District 22[edit]

The 22nd district encompasses the south-central Greater Houston metropolitan area, including the southern Houston suburbs of Sugar Land, Pearland, and Webster. The incumbent is Republican Pete Olson, who was re-elected with 51.4% of the vote in 2018,[1] subsequently announced he would not seek re-election on July 25, 2019.[124]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrew[edit]
Declined[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Pierce Bush
Sri Preston Kulkarni
Organizations

District 23[edit]

The 23rd district covers southwestern Texas, including the Big Bend, the southern and western San Antonio suburbs, and the southwestern El Paso suburbs. The incumbent Republican Will Hurd, who was re-elected with 49.2% of the vote in 2018,[1] subsequently announced he would not seek re-election on August 1, 2019.[146]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Declined[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Tony Gonzales
Federal Politicians
Organizations

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Declined[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Gina Ortiz Jones
Organizations

District 24[edit]

The 24th district encompasses the suburbs north of Fort Worth and Dallas, including Grapevine, Carrollton, parts of Irving, and northwestern Dallas. The incumbent is Republican Kenny Marchant, who was re-elected with 50.6% of the vote in 2018.[1] Marchant announced he would not seek re-election on August 5, 2019.[168]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Declined[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrew[edit]
  • Crystal Fletcher, lawyer[179]

Third parties[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Steve Kuzmich (Independent), attorney[180]

Endorsements[edit]

Candace Valenzuela (D)
Federal politicians
Organizations
Beth Van Duyne (R)
Organizations

District 25[edit]

The 25th district runs from north Austin through rural areas of Texas Hill Country northward into southern Fort Worth suburbs. The incumbent is Republican Roger Williams, who was re-elected with 53.5% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

District 26[edit]

The 26th district is based in the northern portion of the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex, centering on Denton County. The incumbent is Republican Michael C. Burgess, who was re-elected with 59.4% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Michael Armstrong, pastor[2]
  • Michael C. Burgess, incumbent U.S. Representative[2]
  • Jason Mrochek, U.S. Army veteran and founder of the Patriot Coalition[189]
  • Jack Wyman, activist[190]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

District 27[edit]

The 27th district stretches across the Coastal Bend, from Corpus Christi up to Bay City. The incumbent is Republican Michael Cloud, who was re-elected with 60.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Ricardo "Rick" De La Fuente, businessman[193]
  • Charlie Jackson, businessman[193]

District 28[edit]

The 28th district is based in the Laredo area and stretches north of the Rio Grande Valley into east San Antonio. The incumbent is Democrat Henry Cuellar, who was re-elected with 84.4% of the vote in 2018 without major-party opposition.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Jessica Cisneros
Federal politicians
Local politicians
Party officials
Individuals
Labor unions
Organizations
Henry Cuellar
Federal politicians

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Sandra Whitten, Sunday school teacher[221]

Third parties[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

District 29[edit]

The 29th district encompasses parts of eastern Houston, taking in the heavily Latino areas of the city. The incumbent is Democrat Sylvia Garcia, who was elected with 75.1% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Jaimy Z. Blanco, real estate investor and candidate for Texas's 29th congressional district in 2018[2]
  • Robert Schafranek, sales associate and candidate for Texas's 29th congressional district in 2016 and 2018[2]

District 30[edit]

The 30th district encompasses Downtown Dallas as well as South Dallas. The incumbent is Democrat Eddie Bernice Johnson, who was re-elected with 91.1% of the vote in 2018 without major-party opposition.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

District 31[edit]

The 31st district encompasses northern Austin to Temple, including Williamson and Bell counties. The incumbent is Republican John Carter, who was re-elected with 50.6% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • John Carter, incumbent U.S. Representative[224]
  • Abhiram Garapati, real estate investor[225]
  • Christopher Wall, police officer[31]
  • Mike Williams, retired firefighter[225]
  • John Bohlin, Christian school teacher/ football coach, Evangelical Christian[225]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Declined[edit]

Third parties[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Jeremy Bravo (Independent), business consultant and former nonprofit executive[228]
  • Clark Patterson (Libertarian), photographer and videographer and candidate for Texas's 35th congressional district in 2018
Declined[edit]
  • Trip Seibold (Libertarian), former software engineer (running for Texas State Board of Education district 10)[229]

District 32[edit]

The 32nd district covers northern and eastern Dallas and its inner northern suburbs. The incumbent is Democrat Colin Allred, who flipped the district and was elected with 52.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Declined[edit]

Libertarian primary[edit]

Candidates

Declared

  • Christy Mowrey, executive director of education[234]

Endorsements[edit]

Colin Allred (D)
Organizations
Genevieve Collins
Organizations

District 33[edit]

The 33rd district is located in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex, encompassing Downtown Fort Worth, western Dallas, and parts of Grand Prairie and Irving. The incumbent is Democrat Marc Veasey, who was re-elected with 76.2% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Sean Paul Segura, activist[2]
  • Marc Veasey, incumbent U.S. Representative[2]
  • Carlos Quintanilla, businessman, activist, and former candidate in 2016

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Fabian Vasquez, business manager[2]

District 34[edit]

The 34th district stretches from Brownsville in the Rio Grande Valley, northward into rural counties. The incumbent is Democrat Filemon Vela, who was elected with 60.0% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Osbert Rodriguez Haro III, health consultant[243]
  • Filemon Vela, incumbent U.S. Representative[243]
  • Diego Zavala, high school teacher[243]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Rey Gonzalez, physician and nominee for Texas's 34th congressional district in 2016 and 2018[243]
  • Rod Lingsch, pilot[243]

District 35[edit]

The 35th district connects eastern San Antonio to southeastern Austin, through the I-35 corridor. The incumbent is Democrat Lloyd Doggett, who was re-elected with 71.3% in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • William Hayward, ostrich farmer[2]
  • Nick Moutos, attorney[244]
  • Jennifer Garcia Sharon, volunteer caregiver[2]

District 36[edit]

The 36th district encompasses parts of Southeast Texas, including the Clear Lake region. The incumbent is Republican Brian Babin, who was re-elected with 72.6% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Rashad Lewis, former Jasper city councilman[2]

Notes[edit]

Partisan clients
  1. ^ a b Poll commissioned by the Congressional Leadership Fund

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj Wasserman, David; Flinn, Ally (November 7, 2018). "2018 House Popular Vote Tracker". Cook Political Report. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo "Candidate Information". candidate.texas-election.com. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  3. ^ "Republican Primary Candidates". Republican Party of Texas. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  4. ^ Mansfield, Erin (September 5, 2019). "'Conservative Democrat' announces run against Congressman Louie Gohmert". Tyler Morning Telegraph. Retrieved September 14, 2019.
  5. ^ Wallace, Jeremy (August 9, 2019). "Houston's Dan Crenshaw is top fundraiser in Texas among U.S. House candidates". Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  6. ^ Wallace, Jeremy (February 8, 2019). "Navy veteran challenges fellow Navy veteran Rep. Dan Crenshaw in Houston Congressional District". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
  7. ^ Scherer, Jasper (December 10, 2019). "Former O'Rourke adviser announces for Congress, picks up his endorsement". The Houston Chronicle. Retrieved December 10, 2019.
  8. ^ Scherer, Jasper (November 7, 2019). "Second Democrat launches challenge to Crenshaw in 2nd Congressional District". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved November 13, 2019.
  9. ^ Collier, Mike [@CollierForTexas] (October 14, 2019). "As many of you now know, I was approached to run for Congress. But after much thought, I have decided not to run" (Tweet). Retrieved October 14, 2019 – via Twitter.
  10. ^ "Combat Veterans For Congress | Electing Fiscal Conservatives". www.combatveteransforcongress.org. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  11. ^ Montellaro, Zach (October 2, 2019). "The extraneous circumstances caucu". Politico. Retrieved October 2, 2019.
  12. ^ Jeffers Jr., Gromer (October 8, 2019). "Plano lawyer Lulu Seikaly latest Democrat to challenge Republican Van Taylor for Congress". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  13. ^ Pramanik, Aayushi (January 31, 2019). "Lorie Burch announces 2020 candidacy for U.S. Congress in TX-3". Local Profile. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  14. ^ "Important Campaign Announcement". Facebook.
  15. ^ Trump, Donald J. [@realDonaldTrump] (July 28, 2019). "I am pleased to announce that highly respected Congressman John Ratcliffe of Texas will be nominated by me to be the Director of National Intelligence" (Tweet). Retrieved July 29, 2019 – via Twitter.
  16. ^ Beavers, Olivia [@Olivia_Beavers] (August 2, 2019). "The president drops his appointment of Ratcliffe for DNI, which also shortly after congressman made his first public remarks pushing back in a statement against a WaPo story about his record" (Tweet). Retrieved August 2, 2019 – via Twitter.
  17. ^ Haberman, Maggie (July 28, 2019). "Dan Coats to Step Down as Intelligence Chief After Strife With Trump". New York Times. Retrieved July 28, 2019.
  18. ^ Bischof, Greg; Richter, Karl (December 11, 2019). "Candidates file for March primaries". Texarkana Gazette. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  19. ^ Davis, Sheryl (December 12, 2019). "Former Palestine mayor running for congress". Palestine Herald-Press. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  20. ^ Cobler, Paul (July 29, 2019). "Texas Rep. Ron Wright still running for reelection despite lung cancer diagnosis". Dallas News. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  21. ^ Benning, Tom (July 10, 2019). "Clay Jenkins' business partner launches House campaign against Arlington Rep. Ron Wright". Dallas News. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  22. ^ Acosta, Lucas (September 13, 2019). "Human Rights Campaign Endorses U.S. Rep. Lizzie Fletcher for Reelection". Retrieved September 13, 2019.
  23. ^ "Home". Maria Espinoza for Congress 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  24. ^ Abrahams, Tom (April 1, 2019). "Combat veteran to challenge Fletcher for Congressional seat". KTRK. Retrieved April 1, 2019.
  25. ^ Svitek, Patrick (July 9, 2019). "We've got a new Republican candidate in #TX07: Jim Noteware, Houston real-estate developer and former director of city housing department". Retrieved July 9, 2019.
  26. ^ a b Smithwick, Danica (December 10, 2019). "See who is running to represent Cy-Fair in the 2020 election". Community Impact Newspaper. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  27. ^ Begley, Dug (April 9, 2019). "Former Bellaire mayor Cindy Siegel signals 7th district run, resigns Metro seat". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  28. ^ Hoffman, Ken (May 6, 2019). "Ken Hoffman gets to the bottom of whether or not Ed Emmett will run for office". CultureMap Houston. Retrieved May 7, 2019.
  29. ^ Bowman, Bridget (September 6, 2019). "Republican retirements raise questions about GOP optimism in 2020". Roll Call. Retrieved September 6, 2019.
  30. ^ Brown, Joseph (December 10, 2019). "Brady will face GOP primary challenger". The Huntsville Item. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h "Area congressional races attract long lists of candidates". KWTX. December 10, 2019. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  32. ^ @PatrickSvitek (April 5, 2019). "Leaving Pence event in Houston, @RepMcCaul confirms he's running for re-election in 2020. #TX10" (Tweet). Retrieved April 8, 2019 – via Twitter.
  33. ^ Gandhi, Pritesh [@priteshgandhimd] (March 5, 2019). "This morning, I announced my campaign for #TX10. I'm running for Congress to bring a voice to working families of Texas. This campaign is about renewing our collective commitment to core American values of dignity, fairness, opportunity, and duty. Join us:" (Tweet). Retrieved March 12, 2019 – via Twitter.
  34. ^ Svitek, Patrick [@PatrickSvitek] (May 20, 2019). "New — Another Democrat is entering the #TX10 primary: Austin lawyer Shannon Hutcheson" (Tweet). Retrieved May 21, 2019 – via Twitter.
  35. ^ Downey, Renzo (January 21, 2019). "Mike Siegel running again in North Austin congressional district". Austin American-Statesman. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
  36. ^ "Michael Siegel". Brand New Congress. October 25, 2019. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  37. ^ Movement, Sunrise (December 12, 2019). "Sunrise Movement launches first wave of Congressional primary endorsements, fortifying Green New…". Medium. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  38. ^ Schriock, Stephanie (November 13, 2019). "EMILY's List Endorses Shannon Hutcheson in Texas' 10th Congressional District". www.emilyslist.org. EMILY's List.
  39. ^ Hogue, Ilyse (November 15, 2019). "NARAL Pro-Choice America Endorses Shannon Hutcheson for Congress". NARAL Pro-Choice America.
  40. ^ a b Sherman, Jake; Zanona, Melanie (July 30, 2019). "GOP Rep. Mike Conaway won't seek reelection in 2020". POLITICO. Retrieved July 31, 2019.
  41. ^ "CONSERVATIVE BUSINESSMAN BRANDON BATCH ANNOUNCES RUN FOR CONGRESS". Brownwood News. October 2, 2019. Retrieved October 2, 2019.
  42. ^ Blanco, Victor. "Jamie Berryhill adds name to list of 11th Congressional District candidates". KWES. Retrieved September 26, 2019.
  43. ^ Doreen, Stewart (October 9, 2019). "Former Midland mayor Faircloth announces congressional bid". Midland Reporter-Telegram. Retrieved October 10, 2019.
  44. ^ "Midland councilman J.Ross Lacy running for Congress". cbs7.com. Retrieved August 8, 2019.
  45. ^ "August Pfluger announces campaign for District 11". Your Basin. September 12, 2019. Retrieved September 16, 2019.
  46. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Friend, Daniel (August 30, 2019). "Battleground 2020 Update: Candidates Running in Some Hotly Contested Texas Races". The Texan. Retrieved September 8, 2019.
  47. ^ "Bartlett withdraws; Berryhill announces". Odessa American. Retrieved October 2, 2019.
  48. ^ Wedding, Paul (August 4, 2019). "Conaway seat up for grabs". OA. Retrieved August 4, 2019.
  49. ^ "Landgraf won't seek Conaway's seat". OA Online. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  50. ^ Scott, Senora (December 6, 2019). "Getting to know your District 11 Candidates: Wacey Alpha Cody". Concho Valley. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  51. ^ "August Pfluger (TX-11) – War Veterans Fund". warveteransfund.org. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  52. ^ Ngo, Madeleine (August 16, 2019). "Kay Granger, only GOP woman from Texas in Congress, keeps low profile but has plenty of influence". Dallas News. Retrieved August 21, 2019.
  53. ^ McConnell, Sarah (September 24, 2019). "Rep. Kay Granger Will Face New Primary Challenger Chris Putnam in 2020". The Texan. Retrieved September 25, 2019.
  54. ^ "Trump went on a mini-endorsement spree on Tuesday". Politico. December 18, 2019.
  55. ^ a b "2020 Candidates". maggieslist.org. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  56. ^ "Granger to Face Primary Challenge From Former Colleyville Council Member". NBC DFW. October 7, 2019. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  57. ^ a b Benning, Tom (September 30, 2019). "Rep. Mac Thornberry becomes sixth Texas Republican in House to announce retirement ahead of 2020 election". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved September 30, 2019.
  58. ^ "Wichita Falls Resident to Run for Congress". Texas Scorecard. November 8, 2019. Retrieved November 13, 2019.
  59. ^ Svitek, Patrick (October 30, 2019). "Another development today in #TX13 Republican primary — Chris Ekstrom, big anti-establishment donor from Dallas, appears to be in. Ekstrom targeted state GOP leaders earlier this year w/ campaign against Confederate monument removal. docquery.fec.gov/cgi-bin/forms/H0TX13137/1361192/ … #txlege". @PatrickSvitek. Retrieved October 30, 2019.
  60. ^ "Hello!". Hello!. Retrieved December 2, 2019.
  61. ^ "13th District Race Grows as More Candidates Emerge". The Amarillo Pioneer. Retrieved December 7, 2019.
  62. ^ "Amarillo Councilwoman Joins 13th District Congressional Race". Texas Scorecard. October 30, 2019. Retrieved October 30, 2019.
  63. ^ "Exclusive: Herman Announces Candidacy for 13th Congressional District Seat". The Amarillo Pioneer. Retrieved November 12, 2019.
  64. ^ "Ronny Jackson Files in 13th District Race". The Amarillo Pioneer. Retrieved December 9, 2019.
  65. ^ Choate, Trish (December 3, 2019). "Henrietta attorney files to run in March 3 GOP Primary for 13th Congressional District". Wichita Falls Times Record. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  66. ^ a b "Republican Primary Candidates". Republican Party of Texas. Retrieved November 23, 2019.
  67. ^ Fox, Katelyn (November 25, 2019). "Local 20-year educator runs for the 13th District seat". FOX News 6. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  68. ^ "STATEMENT OF CANDIDACY" (PDF). Retrieved December 1, 2019.
  69. ^ Warren, Thomas. "Snider Enters Race for Open 13th Congressional District Seat". The Amarillo Pioneer. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  70. ^ "Winegarner Files with FEC to Run for Thornberry's Seat". The Amarillo Pioneer. Retrieved October 23, 2019.
  71. ^ "Wichita Falls woman announces plans to run for congressional district 13". Texomashomepage.com. October 10, 2019. Retrieved October 15, 2019.
  72. ^ "McInturff Withdraws From 13th District Race". The Amarillo Pioneer. Retrieved December 9, 2019.
  73. ^ "Log In or Sign Up to View". facebook.com. Retrieved October 28, 2019.
  74. ^ "Brinkley Backs Off U.S. House Bid". The Amarillo Pioneer. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  75. ^ Warren, Thomas (September 10, 2019). "Thornberry Won't Declare 2020 Intentions in New Interview". The Amarillo Pioneer. Retrieved September 14, 2019.
  76. ^ "Four Price files for re-election to Texas House". High Plains Pundit. Retrieved October 15, 2019.
  77. ^ "Former WFISD president confirms run for Texas '13th Congressional District seat". Texomashomepage.com. November 18, 2019. Retrieved November 22, 2019.
  78. ^ https://thetexan.news/exclusive-club-for-growth-pac-endorses-chris-ekstrom-in-race-to-replace-retiring-thornberry/
  79. ^ https://www.amarillopioneer.com/blog/2020/1/10/texas-right-to-life-endorses-ekstrom-for-congress
  80. ^ Svitek, Patrick (December 12, 2019). "@ekstromfortexas rolls out first endorsement from Texas delegation: @RepRonWright". twitter.
  81. ^ a b "Gassaway Joins Democratic Primary for 13th District Seat". The Amarillo Pioneer. December 9, 2019. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  82. ^ "Greg Sagan Running for Congress 2020". KAMR/KCIT. March 2, 2019. Retrieved April 17, 2019.
  83. ^ "Libertarian Candidate Declares for Thornberry's Seat". The Amarillo Pioneer. Retrieved December 8, 2019.
  84. ^ Saunders, Cliff (September 18, 2019). "Texas Republican airs concern about losing state to Democrats". KTRH News Radio. Retrieved December 14, 2019.
  85. ^ a b c McCarty, Maddy (August 18, 2019). "Local Democrats hope to unseat Weber". The Facts. Retrieved September 15, 2019.
  86. ^ "Adrienne Bell". Brand New Congress. October 21, 2019. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  87. ^ "Democracy for America : Democracy for America backs Adrienne Bell for Congress in TX-14". www.democracyforamerica.com. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  88. ^ a b c d e f Litton, Andra (December 10, 2019). "List: 2020 March Primary candidates". KTSM. Retrieved December 14, 2019.
  89. ^ a b Gilman, Todd J. (September 4, 2019). "Texas exodus from Congress grows as Bill Flores become 5th Republican to retire". Dallas Morning News. Retrieved September 4, 2019.
  90. ^ a b c d Crum, Brooke (November 26, 2019). "Congressional District 17 candidate field grows to 12 with new filings". Waco Tribune-Herald. Retrieved December 11, 2019.
  91. ^ Witherspoon, Tommy (November 13, 2019). "Candidates line up for U.S. Rep. Flores' seat in first week of filing". Waco Tribune-Herald.
  92. ^ Waltens, Brandon (October 29, 2019). "Austin-Area Rocket Scientist Hindman Enters Congressional Race". Retrieved November 13, 2019.
  93. ^ a b Crum, Brooke (November 22, 2019). "2 more Republicans, another Democrat announce campaigns for Flores' congressional seat". Waco Tribune-Herald. Retrieved November 25, 2019.
  94. ^ a b c Falls, Clay (December 10, 2019). "Runoff expected for race to replace Rep. Bill Flores in District 17". KBTX-TV. Retrieved December 14, 2019.
  95. ^ a b Svitek, Patrick (October 3, 2019). "Former U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions announces campaign for open Bill Flores seat". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved November 25, 2019.
  96. ^ "College Station City Council member Vessali announces run for District 17 congressional seat". The Eagle. November 23, 2019. Retrieved November 25, 2019.
  97. ^ Oliver, Bill (September 11, 2019). "Two Bryan/College Station Residents Exploring A Run For Congress". WTAW- Brazos Valley News. Retrieved September 30, 2019.
  98. ^ "U.S. Rep. Flores says forthcoming departure 'bittersweet' as he reflects on 5 terms in office". Waco Tribune-Herald. September 4, 2019. Retrieved September 30, 2019.
  99. ^ Witherspoon, Tommy (November 13, 2019). "Candidates line up for U.S. Rep Flores' seat in first week of filing". Waco Tribune-Herald. Retrieved November 22, 2019.
  100. ^ Kennedy, Rick [@RickKennedyTX17] (April 2, 2019). "Today I announce my 2020 challenge to long-time incumbent Bill Flores. With your support in last year's election, I finished with the closest margin of any Democrat since TX17 was drawn in 2011. I'll be out in the district soon. See you then!" (Tweet). Retrieved April 3, 2019 – via Twitter.
  101. ^ Loudon, Trevor (December 11, 2019). "Comrades for Congress: DSA Lists More Than 100 'Progressive' Congressional Candidates for 2020". The Epoch Times. Retrieved December 14, 2019.
  102. ^ a b c d Bethel, Brian (December 10, 2019). "Jodey Arrington appears to have challengers in primary election". Abilene Reporter-News. Retrieved December 14, 2019.
  103. ^ Livingston, Abby; Svitek, Patrick (May 1, 2019). "Joaquin Castro won't challenge John Cornyn for U.S. Senate seat". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved May 2, 2019.
  104. ^ a b Martinez, Sarah (September 25, 2019). "Man Who Served as Corpus Christi Mayor for 37 Days Announces Run for Joaquin Castro's Congressional Seat". San Antonio Current. Retrieved December 14, 2019.
  105. ^ Browning, Bil (August 13, 2019). "This gay bar owner is a Trump supporter. Now he's running for Congress against an LGBTQ ally". LGBTQ Nation. Retrieved August 15, 2019.
  106. ^ a b "Federal, State and County". Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  107. ^ Livingston, Abby (July 22, 2019). "Wendy Davis announces bid for Congress, will challenge U.S. Rep. Chip Roy". The Texas Tribune.
  108. ^ Benning, Tom; Coello, Sara (July 22, 2019). "Texas Democrat Wendy Davis announces congressional bid in political comeback". Dallas News. Retrieved July 31, 2019.
  109. ^ Svitek, Patrick [@PatrickSvitek] (March 23, 2019). "New: @JosephKopser emails supporters that he won't run for office in 2020. Had been considering #TXSEN campaign or #TX21 rerun" (Tweet). Retrieved March 23, 2019 – via Twitter.
  110. ^ Brown, Kris (November 25, 2019). "Brady Endorses Wendy Davis for Congress". Brady.
  111. ^ Axelrod, Tal (December 12, 2019). "Congressional Hispanic Caucus campaign arm endorses two Texas Democrats". TheHill. Bold PAC endorsed Gina Ortiz Jones in Texas’s 23rd Congressional District and Wendy Davis in the state's 21st Congressional District
  112. ^ Muller, Tiffany (September 11, 2019). "End Citizens United Endorses Wendy Davis For TX-21". End Citizens United.
  113. ^ "EMILY'S LIST ENDORSES WENDY DAVIS IN TEXAS' 21ST CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT". Emily's List. October 24, 2019.
  114. ^ Sittenfeld, Tiernan (November 20, 2019). "LCV Action Fund Endorses Wendy Davis For Congress". League of Conservation Voters. LCV Action Fund.
  115. ^ Hogue, Ilyse; Arrambide, Aimee (October 28, 2019). "NARAL Pro-Choice America Endorses Wendy Davis for Congress". NARAL Pro-Choice America.
  116. ^ "2020 Endorsements". plannedparenthoodaction.org. Planned Parenthood Action Fund.
  117. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb https://chiproy.com/endorsements/
  118. ^ http://cupvf.org/2020.aspx
  119. ^ https://www.clubforgrowth.org/candidates/chip-roy/
  120. ^ https://contribute.freedomworksforamerica.org/chip_roy_give?utm_source=site-fwfa&utm_medium=candidate&utm_campaign=chip-roy&utm_content=tx-21
  121. ^ https://www.housefreedomfund.com/#candidates
  122. ^ http://www.madisonprojectcandidates.com/endorsements/chip-roy/
  123. ^ https://www.texasrighttolife.com/congressman-chip-roy-already-a-proven-pro-life-leader-as-a-freshman/
  124. ^ a b Tom Benning (July 25, 2019). "Sugar Land Rep. Pete Olson will not run for re-election in district expected to be competitive in 2020". Dallas News. Retrieved July 25, 2019.
  125. ^ Navarro, Aaron (December 9, 2019). "Bush grandson runs for Congress in Texas". CBS News. Retrieved December 14, 2019.
  126. ^ Washington, Chad (November 12, 2019). "Retired Marine major runs for Congress in TX-22". Fort Bend Herald. Retrieved November 16, 2019.
  127. ^ Washington, Chad. "Retired Marine major runs for Congress in TX-22". Fort Bend Herald. Retrieved November 13, 2019.
  128. ^ Mock, Jaime (October 1, 2019). "Houston Attorney Carl Douglas Haggard Running for Pete Olson's District 22 Seat". Fort Bend News. Retrieved December 14, 2019.
  129. ^ Wallace, Jeremy (December 9, 2019). "Diverse Republican contenders flood Houston-area congressional battleground". The Houston Chronicle. Retrieved December 14, 2019.
  130. ^ "Brazoria County judge Greg Hill announces run to fill seat held by retiring Pete Olson". KHOU. August 7, 2019. Retrieved August 7, 2019.
  131. ^ Scherer, Jasperq (December 8, 2019). "Fort Bend's Nehls announces bid for Congress". The Houston Chronicle. Retrieved December 14, 2019.
  132. ^ Friend, Daniel (October 9, 2019). "Battleground 2020 Update: Cornyn, Putnam, Pfluger, and Hunt Boast Big Fundraising Numbers for Third Quarter". The Texan. Retrieved December 14, 2019.
  133. ^ Rupkalvis, David (November 22, 2019). "Candidates start filing in race for Congress". The Alvin & Advertiser Sun. Retrieved November 25, 2019.
  134. ^ Wallace, Jeremy (August 21, 2019). "Houston Republican Kathaleen Wall files to run for Congress again". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved August 21, 2019.
  135. ^ "Walz to seek Congressional seat". Fort Bend Star. January 22, 2019. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  136. ^ Harris Hoss, Felicia [@FeliciaForTX] (December 9, 2019). "After a great deal of prayer and discussion with my husband, friends and supporters, I have decided not to add my name to the 2020 primary ballot for TX CD 22" (Tweet). Retrieved December 14, 2019 – via Twitter.
  137. ^ Parkinson, John (August 20, 2019). "Roger Clemens: 'No interest' in running for Congress despite GOP recruitment effort". ABC News. Retrieved August 20, 2019.
  138. ^ Scherer, Jasper (August 1, 2019). "Budget guru and State Rep. John Zerwas announces retirement". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved July 31, 2019.
  139. ^ Archer, Phil (December 9, 2019). "High profile candidates enter race for 22nd Congressional District seat". Click 2 Houston. Retrieved December 14, 2019.
  140. ^ Scherer, Jasper (April 3, 2019). "Kulkarni launches second bid for Texas' 22nd Congressional District". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved April 4, 2019.
  141. ^ @Politics1com (January 23, 2019). "TX CD-22: Atty and TV political analyst Nyanza Moore (D) enters race vs Cong Pete Olson (R)" (Tweet). Retrieved March 4, 2019 – via Twitter.
  142. ^ Scherer, Jasper (July 15, 2019). "Pearland Councilman Reed joins race for Texas' 22nd Congressional District". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved July 16, 2019.
  143. ^ "Conservation Stalwart, Fort Bend Leader Dr. John Zerwas Endorses Pierce Bush in Congressional District 22 Race". piercebushforcongress.com. December 19, 2019.
  144. ^ "Former Congressman Ted Poe endorses Pierce Bush for Congress". piercebushforcongress.com. December 19, 2019.
  145. ^ Svitek, Patrick (November 12, 2019). "End Citizens United endorses Kulkarni for TX-22". Texas Tribune.
  146. ^ a b Moore, Robert (August 1, 2019). "Texas Rep. Hurd, lone black Republican in House, won't seek reelection". The Washington Post. Retrieved August 1, 2019.
  147. ^ Gleason, Karen (March 29, 2019). "GOP candidate announces congressional run". Del Rio News-Herald. Retrieved September 14, 2019.
  148. ^ a b c Lambrecht, Bill (December 9, 2019). "No shortage of interest in the seat Rep. Will Hurd will vacate in 2021". San Antonio Express-News. Retrieved December 15, 2019.
  149. ^ Montellaro, Zach; Shepard, Steven (August 5, 2019). "Senate race elbows in at Fancy Farm". POLITICO. Retrieved August 8, 2019.
  150. ^ Singer, Jeff (November 7, 2019). "Daily Kos Elections Live Digest: 11/7". The Daily Kos. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  151. ^ Sain, Aurora (October 28, 2019). "Congressional field grows to 10 candidates". The Fort Stockton Pioneer. Retrieved December 15, 2019.
  152. ^ Singer, Jeff (November 15, 2019). "Daily Kos Elections Live Digest: 11/15". The Daily Kos. Retrieved November 16, 2019.
  153. ^ Tufts, John (December 9, 2019). "Former San Angelo mayor decides not to run for Congress after debilitating injury". San Angelo Standard-Times. Retrieved December 15, 2019.
  154. ^ Svitek, Patrick (November 13, 2019). "Retiring U.S. Rep. Will Hurd endorses candidate to succeed him". Texas Tribune.
  155. ^ "Tony Gonzalez (TX-23) – War Veterans Fund". warveteransfund.org. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  156. ^ McGuinness, Dylan (May 14, 2019). "Gina Ortiz Jones will again challenge Rep. Will Hurd in San Antonio-based congressional district". San Antonio Express-News. Retrieved May 14, 2019.
  157. ^ Svitek, Patrick (September 16, 2019). "State Rep. César Blanco to run for Texas Senate". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved September 16, 2019.
  158. ^ "TX CD-23: Ex-Cong Pete Gallego (D) will not be jumping into the race for his former seat. Instead, Gallego endorsed Iraq War vet & '18 nom Gina Ortiz Jones (D) for the open seat race". @Politics1com. Twitter. August 15, 2019.
  159. ^ Ortiz Jones, Gina (August 14, 2019). "I'm honored to have the support of our former Congressman Pete Gallego and his family". @GinaOrtizJones. Twitter.
  160. ^ Simpson, Yvette (May 17, 2019). "Democracy for America : DFA backs Gina Ortiz Jones in rematch in Texas' 23rd Congressional District". democracyforamerica.com. Democracy for America.
  161. ^ "Gina Ortiz Jones". emilyslist.org. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  162. ^ "Endorsed Candidates". End Citizens United.
  163. ^ Acosta, Lucas (September 13, 2019). "HRC Endorses Gina Ortiz Jones for U.S. Congress". Human Rights Campaign.
  164. ^ "Our Candidates - Federal". LGBTQ Victory Fund.
  165. ^ "Our Candidates {Posts Only)". LPAC.
  166. ^ "2020 Endorsements". plannedparenthoodaction.org. Planned Parenthood Action Fund.
  167. ^ Soltz, Jon (May 15, 2019). "VOTEVETS ENDORSES GINA ORTIZ JONES FOR CONGRESS". VoteVets.org.
  168. ^ a b Martin, Jonathan (August 5, 2019). "Kenny Marchant Will Be Fourth Texas Republican Congressman to Retire in 2020". New York Times. Retrieved August 5, 2019.
  169. ^ Svitek, Patrick; Willis, Adam; Livingston, Abby (August 4, 2019). "U.S. Rep. Kenny Marchant will not seek reelection, marking the fourth recent GOP retirement in Texas". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved September 14, 2019.
  170. ^ McGaughy, Lauren (October 10, 2019). "Two more Republicans throw in their hats for open DFW congressional seat". Dallas Morning News. Retrieved October 10, 2019.
  171. ^ "Former Irving mayor Beth Van Duyne to run for Congress". FOX. August 6, 2019. Retrieved August 6, 2019.
  172. ^ "Twitter". mobile.twitter.com. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  173. ^ Tinsley, Anna M. (August 5, 2019). "U.S. Rep. Kenny Marchant retires. Now who will run to replace him in Congress?". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Retrieved August 5, 2019.
  174. ^ @cassi_pollock (August 15, 2019). ".@RonforTexas on not seeking public office in 2020 — "I am not ruling out entering the political arena as a candidate in the future, but for this cycle my time is best spent helping Republicans get elected in HD 65, CD 24, and other offices..." #txlege" (Tweet). Retrieved August 15, 2019 – via Twitter.
  175. ^ Biggan, John [@Biggan4Congress] (April 4, 2019). "Lauren and I are so excited to announce my candidacy for #TX24. We love this district. How's the 24th impacted your life? #Biggan2020" (Tweet). Retrieved April 4, 2019 – via Twitter.
  176. ^ McDowell, Jan (December 21, 2018). "In case you were wondering, your District 24 representative, Kenny Marchant, voted in favor of Trump's border wall bill today. Big surprise. And yes, I would have voted NO. Marchant has consistently said that his approach to immigration focuses on "securing the border and enforcing measures to prevent illegal entries." I would rather address the issue in a more comprehensive way, and listen to people on the border who say a wall would be an ineffective waste of money". Facebook. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  177. ^ Drusch, Andrea (March 11, 2019). "Democrats line up for new Texas target". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Retrieved March 12, 2019.
  178. ^ Drusch, Andrea (April 15, 2019). "34-year-old school board member enters race against Texas Rep. Marchant". McClatchy. Retrieved April 15, 2019.
  179. ^ Singer, Jeff (January 14, 2020). "Daily Kos Elections Live Digest: 1/14". The Daily Kos. Retrieved January 14, 2020.
  180. ^ Kuzmich, Steve (August 8, 2019). "Please listen to our recorded campaign kickoff meeting presentation for the ONLY fiscally conservative and socially moderate-progressive candidate for US Congress TX24. Watch here>https://bit.ly/2MP4yJt". @stevekuzmich. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  181. ^ Valenzuela, Candace (September 30, 2019). "Really exciting news! @Deb4CongressNM has endorsed our campaign! Congresswoman Haaland is an incredible leader who knows how to win a grassroots powered campaign. Join Rep. Haaland by donating before tonight's major fundraising deadline:". @candacefor24. Twitter.
  182. ^ Montellaro, Zach (September 4, 2019). "The first shoe drops after Hickenlooper's Senate switch". POLITICO. CHC BOLD PAC, the political arm of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, announced it was endorsing Democrat Candace Valenzuela in the open-seat race in TX-24.
  183. ^ Schriock, Stephanie (November 7, 2019). "EMILY's List Endorses Candace Valenzuela in Texas' 24th Congressional District". emilyslist.org. EMILY's List.
  184. ^ "Candidates". The Collective PAC.
  185. ^ PAC, PODER (September 27, 2019). "PODER PAC endorses first two candidates for 2020 @TeresaForNM and @candacefor24 Help us double the # of Latinas in Congress in 2020 …". @PODERPAC. Twitter.
  186. ^ "Beth Van Duyne". Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  187. ^ King, Michael (June 14, 2019). "Congressional Candidates Begin to Multiply". The Austin Chronicle. Retrieved June 23, 2019.
  188. ^ King, Michael (August 13, 2019). "Community Organizer Heidi Sloan Announces Candidacy for TX-25". The Austin Chronicle. Retrieved September 4, 2019.
  189. ^ Weir, Bob (May 8, 2019). "Weir: Jason Mrochek running for Congress". The Cross Timbers Gazette. Retrieved December 15, 2019.
  190. ^ St. Clair, Kiara (September 14, 2019). "Republican Jack Wyman announces his candidacy for Texas Congressional District 26, challenging incumbent Michael Burgess". North Texas. Retrieved December 15, 2019.
  191. ^ Reid, Marshall (December 10, 2019). "More names added to local, state, federal ballots". Denton Record-Chronicle. Retrieved December 15, 2019.
  192. ^ a b Roark, Chris (December 12, 2019). "Primary election slate set". Flower Mound Leader. Retrieved December 15, 2019.
  193. ^ a b "Democratic primary light on county candidates". Victoria Advocate. December 13, 2019. Retrieved December 15, 2019.
  194. ^ Wallace, Julia (June 13, 2019). "Meet Jessica Cisneros, the 26-year-old Laredo attorney running against Cuellar in Congress". Laredo Morning Times. Retrieved June 13, 2019.
  195. ^ "Elizabeth Warren endorses Texas U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar's Democratic primary challenger". September 9, 2019.
  196. ^ Marans, Daniel (October 22, 2019). "Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Endorses Democratic Primary Challenger Jessica Cisneros". HuffPost. The Huffington Post.
  197. ^ Manchester, Julia (October 29, 2019). "Ayanna Pressley endorses Democrat Henry Cuellar's primary challenger". TheHill.
  198. ^ a b c Wallace, Julia (October 9, 2019). "Jessica Cisneros picks up 10 local endorsements from District 28 officials". Laredo Morning Times.
  199. ^ Alonzo, Cristela (January 6, 2019). "Unacceptable. @RepCuellar is using the same tactics that Dick Saslaw tried against me in our primary: He's accusing his challenger of supporting terrorism because she opposes war. The residents of #TX28 deserve better. Donate here to @JCisnerosTX:". @YasmineTaeb. Twitter.
  200. ^ Alonzo, Cristela (November 28, 2019). "I am SO thankful to be able to support @JCisnerosTX as she flights to get the voice from the people back home heard. Donate here:…". @cristela9. Twitter.
  201. ^ Fuentes, Charles (October 23, 2019). "CWA District 6 Endorses Jessica Cisneros for Congress". Communications Workers of America. CWA District 6.
  202. ^ Ross, Jean (November 7, 2019). "National Nurses United Endorses Jessica Cisneros for Congress". National Nurses United.
  203. ^ O’Laughlin, Tamara Toles (November 12, 2019). "350 Action Endorses Jessica Cisneros (TX-28), Jamaal Bowman (NY-16), and Alex Morse (MA-01)". 350 Action.
  204. ^ Nir, David (November 18, 2019). "We're endorsing two fantastic progressive women to help boot out the lousiest Democrats in Congress". Daily Kos. Daily Kos Elections.
  205. ^ Simpson, Yvette (December 23, 2019). "Democracy for America : Democracy for America endorses Jessica Cisneros for Congress in TX-28 primary battle". www.democracyforamerica.com. Democracy for America.
  206. ^ Schriock, Stephanie (October 17, 2019). "EMILY's List Endorses Jessica Cisneros in Texas' 28th Congressional District". emilyslist.org. EMILY's List.
  207. ^ a b c d e Seitz-Wald, Alex (December 3, 2019). "Leading progressive groups endorse Rep. Henry Cuellar primary challenger". NBC News.
  208. ^ "JStreetPAC Candidates". JStreetPAC.
  209. ^ Rodrigo, Chris Mills (June 13, 2019). "Justice Democrats endorse primary challenge to Texas Dem Cuellar". TheHill. The Hill.
  210. ^ "Justice Democrats | It's #OurTime". justicedemocrats.com. Justice Democrats.
  211. ^ Sittenfeld, Tiernan (December 3, 2019). "In a Show of Force, Coalition of Leading Progressive Organizations Endorse Jessica Cisneros' Primary Challenge to Rep. Henry Cuellar". League of Conservation Voters.
  212. ^ "NARAL's Election Endorsements". NARAL Pro-Choice America.
  213. ^ "2020 Endorsements". www.plannedparenthoodaction.org. Planned Parenthood Action Fund. December 3, 2019.
  214. ^ Axelrod, Tal (November 5, 2019). "Progressive group unveils first slate of 2020 congressional endorsements". TheHill. The Hill. The group endorsed Jessica Cisneros, who is taking on Rep. Henry Cuellar in Texas
  215. ^ Kay, Janis (January 7, 2020). "Meet Jessica Cisneros, Progressive For Congress". pdamerica.org/. Progressive Democrats of America.
  216. ^ Kaufman, Alexander (September 23, 2019). "Green New Dealers Name Oil-Friendly Texas Democrat As First 2020 Primary Target". Huffington Post. Sunrise Movement, the youth-led nonprofit whose protests last year popularized the Green New Deal slogan, endorsed Jessica Cisneros
  217. ^ Reyna, Adrian (December 18, 2019). "Immigrant Youth Endorse Jessica Cisneros for Texas Congressional District 28". United We Dream Action.
  218. ^ Mitchell, Maurice (October 9, 2019). "Working Families Party Endorses Jessica Cisneros for Congress in Texas". Working Families Party.
  219. ^ Miller, Hayley (September 30, 2019). "Pelosi Endorses Conservative Democrat Henry Cuellar Over Progressive Challenger". HuffPost.
  220. ^ Svitek, Patrick (September 30, 2019). "Democratic leaders in the House rally behind U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar amid primary challenge". The Texas Tribune.
  221. ^ Wallace, Julia; Times, LMTonline com / Laredo Morning (June 21, 2019). "Republican challenger emerges for Cuellar's seat in Congress". Laredo Morning Times. Retrieved June 22, 2019.
  222. ^ "2020 LPTexas Candidates List". Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  223. ^ Jeffers Jr., Gromer (October 9, 2019). "Dallas Democrat Eddie Bernice Johnson running for 15th term in Congress". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  224. ^ Carter, John [@JudgeJohnCarter] (August 7, 2019). "I am as committed as ever to bring more Texas to Washington and keep Washington out of Texas! #2020" (Tweet). Retrieved August 7, 2019 – via Twitter.
  225. ^ a b c d e King, Michael (August 30, 2019). "Dems Vie for Incumbent Rep. John Carter's Round Rock Seat". The Austin Chronicle. Retrieved September 12, 2019.
  226. ^ a b Svitek, Patrick [@PatrickSvitek] (April 23, 2019). "With @mjhegar announced for #txsen, spotlight grows a bit brighter on #TX31 Dem field. Former countywide candidate Omar Kadir is already in, 2018 runoff runner-up @DrChristineMann has said she's very likely to run again" (Tweet). Retrieved April 23, 2019 – via Twitter.
  227. ^ Buchanan, Taylor Jackson (October 30, 2019). "Round Rock City Council Member Tammy Young is running for Congress". Community Impact Newspaper. Retrieved October 30, 2019.
  228. ^ "Jeremy Bravo for Texas". www.facebook.com. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  229. ^ "Third-Party Candidates in Texas Want a Fair Shot". Reform Austin. December 13, 2019. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  230. ^ Mendez, Maria (July 30, 2019). "Dallas Republican Genevieve Collins announces run for U.S. Rep. Colin Allred's seat". Dallas News. Retrieved July 31, 2019.
  231. ^ Israel, Josh (November 11, 2019). "Republican raises $80k to challenge California congressman, then decides to run in Texas". The American Independent. Retrieved December 15, 2019.
  232. ^ "Retired US Navy SEAL Floyd McLendon Announces Campaign For Congress". CBS Dallas / Fort Worth. July 29, 2019. Retrieved July 29, 2019.
  233. ^ Mutnick, Ally (June 3, 2019). "Pete Sessions, Allen West Could Face Off in Epic House Primary". National Journal. Retrieved June 4, 2019.
  234. ^ "2020 Candidates". Libertarian Party of Texas. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  235. ^ Brown, Kris (October 16, 2019). "Brady Expands Endorsements to 8 Gun Violence Prevention Champions for U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives". Brady.
  236. ^ "BOLD PAC". Bold Pac.
  237. ^ "CBCPAC".
  238. ^ "Endorsed Candidates". End Citizens United.
  239. ^ Morrow, Nick (August 18, 2019). "HRC Endorses U.S. Rep. Colin Allred and State Rep. Julie Johnson". Human Rights Campaign.
  240. ^ Sittenfeld, Tiernan (August 15, 2019). "LCV Action Fund Announces Second Round of 2020 Environmental Majority Makers". League of Conservation Voters. LCV Action Fund.
  241. ^ Hogue, Ilyse (March 8, 2019). "NARAL Announces First Slate of Frontline Pro-Choice Endorsements for 2020". NARAL Pro-Choice America.
  242. ^ "2020 Endorsements". plannedparenthoodaction.org. Planned Parenthood Action Fund.
  243. ^ a b c d e McGinley, Garrett (December 12, 2019). "Meet the primary candidates". Gonzales Inquirer. Retrieved December 15, 2019.
  244. ^ King, Michael (October 17, 2019). "Congressional Campaign Fundraising [UPDATE]". Austin Chronicle. Retrieved December 15, 2019.
  245. ^ a b Svitek, Patrick (October 7, 2019). "Primary fights few and far between as Texas Republicans focus on November 2020". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved October 28, 2019.

External links[edit]

Official campaign websites for 1st district candidates
Official campaign websites for 2nd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 3rd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 4th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 5th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 6th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 7th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 8th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 9th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 10th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 11th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 12th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 13th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 14th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 15th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 16th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 17th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 18th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 19th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 20th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 21st district candidates
Official campaign websites for 22nd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 23rd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 24th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 25th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 26th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 27th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 28th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 29th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 30th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 31st district candidates
Official campaign websites for 32nd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 33rd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 34th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 35th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 36th district candidates