2020 United States state legislative elections

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2020 United States state legislative elections

← 2019 November 3, 2020 2021 →

95 legislative chambers
44 states; 5 territories
 
Party Republican Democratic
Chambers before 58 40[a]
Chambers after 60 38[a]
Overall change Increase 2 Decrease 2

2020 California State Senate election2020 Nevada State Senate election2020 Washington State Senate election2020 Oregon State Senate election2020 Alaska State Senate election2020 Hawaii State Senate election2020 Arizona State Senate election2020 Utah State Senate election2020 Idaho State Senate election2020 Montana State Senate election2020 Wyoming State Senate election2020 Colorado State Senate election2020 New Mexico State Senate election2020 Texas State Senate election2020 Oklahoma State Senate election2020 Kansas State Senate election2020 Nebraska State Senate election2020 North Dakota State Senate election2020 South Dakota State Senate election2020 Minnesota State Senate election2020 Iowa State Senate election2020 Missouri State Senate election2020 Arkansas State Senate election2020 Wisconsin State Senate election2020 Illinois State Senate election2020 Indiana State Senate election2020 Kentucky State Senate election2020 Tennessee State Senate election2020 Florida State Senate election2020 Georgia State Senate election2020 South Carolina State Senate election2020 North Carolina State Senate election2020 West Virginia State Senate election2020 Ohio State Senate election2020 Pennsylvania State Senate election2020 Delaware State Senate election2020 New York State Senate election2020 Connecticut State Senate election2020 Rhode Island State Senate election2020 Massachusetts State Senate election2020 Vermont State Senate election2020 New Hampshire State Senate election2020 Maine State Senate electionUS2020stateupperhouses.svg
About this image
Map of upper house elections:
     Democrats retained control
     Republicans gained control
     Republicans retained control
     Non-partisan legislature
     No regularly-scheduled elections

2020 California House of Representatives election2020 Nevada House of Representatives election2020 Washington House of Representatives election2020 Oregon House of Representatives election2020 Alaska House of Representatives election2020 Hawaii House of Representatives election2020 Arizona House of Representatives election2020 Utah House of Representatives election2020 Idaho House of Representatives election2020 Montana House of Representatives election2020 Wyoming House of Representatives election2020 Colorado House of Representatives election2020 New Mexico House of Representatives election2020 Texas House of Representatives election2020 Oklahoma House of Representatives election2020 Kansas House of Representatives election2020 Nebraska House of Representatives election2020 North Dakota House of Representatives election2020 South Dakota House of Representatives election2020 Minnesota House of Representatives election2020 Iowa House of Representatives election2020 Missouri House of Representatives election2020 Arkansas House of Representatives election2020 Wisconsin House of Representatives election2020 Illinois House of Representatives election2020 Michigan House of Representatives election2020 Indiana House of Representatives election2020 Kentucky House of Representatives election2020 Tennessee House of Representatives election2020 Florida House of Representatives election2020 Georgia House of Representatives election2020 South Carolina House of Representatives election2020 North Carolina House of Representatives election2020 West Virginia House of Representatives election2020 Ohio House of Representatives election2020 Pennsylvania House of Representatives election2020 Delaware House of Representatives election2020 New York House of Representatives election2020 Connecticut House of Representatives election2020 Rhode Island House of Representatives election2020 Massachusetts House of Representatives election2020 Vermont House of Representatives election2020 New Hampshire House of Representatives election2020 Maine House of Representatives electionUS2020statelowerhouses.svg
About this image
Map of lower house elections:
     Democrats retained control
     Republicans gained control
     Republicans retained control
     Coalition retained control
     Non-partisan legislature
     No regularly-scheduled elections

The 2020 United States state legislative elections were held on November 3, 2020 for 86 state legislative chambers in 44 states. Across the fifty states, approximately 65 percent of all upper house seats and 85 percent of all lower house seats were up for election. Nine legislative chambers in the five permanently-inhabited U.S. territories and the federal district of Washington, D.C. also held elections. The elections took place concurrently with several other federal, state, and local elections, including the presidential election, U.S. Senate elections, U.S. House elections, and gubernatorial elections.

Prior to the elections, Democrats held 15 trifectas (control of the governor's office and legislative chambers), Republicans held 21 trifectas, and 14 states have a divided government. Nationwide, Republicans controlled approximately 60 percent of the legislative chambers and 52 percent of the legislative seats.[1] These elections had a major impact on the 2020 redistricting cycle, as many states held their final legislative elections prior to the decennial drawing of new congressional and state legislative districts.

Due to the impact the redistricting cycle will have on partisan control of Congress and state legislatures, the Democrats, who had not been in control of a majority of state legislatures across the U.S. since 2010, had hoped to retake control of key chambers in advance. However, despite fundraising efforts and projections of several Republican-held chambers in competitive states flipping, the Democrats failed to flip any state chambers, which they attributed to gerrymandering in the wake of the 2010 elections, as well as state laws restricting voting, President Donald Trump being on the ballot, and the Democrats' campaigning methods.[2][3][4][5] Following the election, Republicans have control of redistricting in 20 state governments, totaling 188 House districts, whereas Democrats have control in states with a total of 73 districts.[6] Overall, these elections saw the fewest partisan changes in state legislatures since 1944.[7]

Summary table[edit]

States holding regularly-scheduled legislative and gubernatorial elections in 2020:
  Governor and all legislative chambers
  All legislative chambers
  A portion of legislative chambers
  None
Seats parties gained in the lower houses 2020 elections:
  Democratic majority and Democrats lost seats
  Democratic majority and Democrats gained or held seats
  Republican majority and Republicans lost seats
  Republican majority and Republicans gained or held seats
  Coalition majority and lost a seat
  No election
  Non-partisan
Partisan control of state and territorial governments following the 2020 elections:
  Democratic trifecta maintained
  Republican trifecta maintained
  Republican trifecta established
  Divided government established
  Divided government maintained
  Officially non-partisan legislature
  Partisan control TBD

Regularly-scheduled elections were held in 86 of the 99 state legislative chambers in the United States. Nationwide, regularly-scheduled elections were held for 5,876 of the 7,383 legislative seats. Many legislative chambers held elections for all seats, but some legislative chambers that use staggered elections held elections for only a portion of the total seats in the chamber.[8] The chambers not up for election either hold regularly-scheduled elections in odd-numbered years, or have four-year terms and hold all regularly-scheduled elections in presidential midterm election years.

Note that this table only covers regularly-scheduled elections; additional special elections took place concurrently with these regularly-scheduled elections.

State Upper House[8] Lower House[8]
Seats up Total % up Term Seats up Total % up Term
Alabama 0 35 0 4 0 105 0 4
Alaska 10 20 50 4 40 40 100 2
Arizona 30 30 100 2 60 60 100 2
Arkansas 17 35 49 2/4[b] 100 100 100 2
California 20 40 50 4 80 80 100 2
Colorado 18 35 51 4 65 65 100 2
Connecticut 36 36 100 2 151 151 100 2
Delaware 11 21 52 2/4[b] 41 41 100 2
Florida 20 40 50 2/4[b] 120 120 100 2
Georgia 56 56 100 2 180 180 100 2
Hawaii 13 25 52 2/4[b] 51 51 100 2
Idaho 35 35 100 2 70 70 100 2
Illinois 20 59 34 2/4[b] 118 118 100 2
Indiana 25 50 50 4 100 100 100 2
Iowa 25 50 50 4 100 100 100 2
Kansas 40 40 100 4 125 125 100 2
Kentucky 19 38 50 4 100 100 100 2
Louisiana 0 39 0 4 0 105 0 4
Maine 35 35 100 2 151 151 100 2
Maryland 0 47 0 4 0 141 0 4
Massachusetts 40 40 100 2 160 160 100 2
Michigan 0 38 0 4 110 110 100 2
Minnesota 67 67 100 2/4[b] 134 134 100 2
Mississippi 0 52 0 4 0 122 0 4
Missouri 17 34 50 4 163 163 100 2
Montana 25 50 50 4 100 100 100 2
Nebraska 25[c] 49[c] 51[c] 4 N/A (unicameral)
Nevada 10 21 48 4 42 42 100 2
New Hampshire 24 24 100 2 400 400 100 2
New Jersey 0 40 0 2/4[b] 0 80 0 2
New Mexico 42 42 100 4 70 70 100 2
New York 63 63 100 2 150 150 100 2
North Carolina 50 50 100 2 120 120 100 2
North Dakota 23 47 49 4 47 94 50 4
Ohio 16 33 48 4 99 99 100 2
Oklahoma 24 48 50 4 101 101 100 2
Oregon 15 30 50 4 60 60 100 2
Pennsylvania 25 50 50 4 203 203 100 2
Rhode Island 38 38 100 2 75 75 100 2
South Carolina 46 46 100 4 124 124 100 2
South Dakota 35 35 100 2 70 70 100 2
Tennessee 16 33 48 4 99 99 100 2
Texas 16 31 52 2/4[b] 150 150 100 2
Utah 15 29 52 4 75 75 100 2
Vermont 30 30 100 2 150 150 100 2
Virginia 0 40 0 4 0 100 0 2
Washington 25 49 51 4 98 98 100 2
West Virginia 17 34 50 4 100 100 100 2
Wisconsin 16 33 48 4 99 99 100 2
Wyoming 15 30 50 4 60 60 100 2
Total 1281 1972 65 N/A 4595 5411 85 N/A

Electoral predictions[edit]

Louis Jacobson of The Cook Political Report predicted that Republican-held chambers that could potentially flip to Democratic control included both chambers in Arizona, the Florida Senate, both chambers in Georgia, the Iowa House, the Michigan House, the Minnesota Senate, both chambers in North Carolina, both chambers in Pennsylvania, and the Texas House. He predicted that Republicans could potentially gain control of the Maine Senate, the Minnesota House, and both chambers in New Hampshire, all of which were controlled by the Democratic Party. Additionally, Jacobson predicted that Republicans could win control of the Alaska House, which was currently controlled by a coalition of Democrats and Republicans.[9]

Writing for Sabato's Crystal Ball, Chaz Nuttycombe highlighted the Alaska House and the New Hampshire Senate as the top pick-up opportunities for Republicans, and lists the Arizona House, the Arizona Senate, the Iowa House, the Michigan House, the Minnesota Senate, the North Carolina House, the North Carolina Senate, the Pennsylvania House, and the Texas House as the top pick-up opportunities for Democrats.[10]

State summaries[edit]

Alaska[edit]

Half of the seats of the Alaska Senate and all of the seats of the Alaska House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. The Alaska Senate is controlled by Republicans, while the Alaska House of Representatives is controlled by a coalition of Democrats, Republicans, and independents.[11] The Alaska House of Representatives is currently the only state legislative chamber controlled by a cross-partisan coalition.

Arizona[edit]

All of the seats of the Arizona Senate and the Arizona House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans have a government trifecta with control of the governorship and both state legislative chambers.

Arkansas[edit]

Half of the seats of the Arkansas Senate and all of the seats of the Arkansas House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

California[edit]

Half of the seats of the California State Senate and all of the seats of the California State Assembly were up for election in 2020. Democrats held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Colorado[edit]

Half of the seats of the Colorado Senate and all of the seats of the Colorado House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Democrats held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Connecticut[edit]

All of the seats of the Connecticut State Senate and the Connecticut House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Democrats held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Delaware[edit]

Half of the seats of the Delaware Senate and all of the seats of the Delaware House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Democrats held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Florida[edit]

Half of the seats of the Florida Senate and all of the seats of the Florida House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Georgia[edit]

All of the seats of the Georgia State Senate and the Georgia House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Hawaii[edit]

Half of the seats of the Hawaii Senate and all of the seats of the Hawaii House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Democrats held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Idaho[edit]

All of the seats of the Idaho Senate and the Idaho House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Illinois[edit]

One third of the seats of the Illinois Senate and all of the seats of the Illinois House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Democrats held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Indiana[edit]

Half of the seats of the Indiana Senate and all of the seats of the Indiana House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Iowa[edit]

Half of the seats of the Iowa Senate and all of the seats of the Iowa House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Kansas[edit]

All of the seats of the Kansas Senate and the Kansas House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans held control of both chambers.

Kentucky[edit]

Half of the seats of the Kentucky Senate and all of the seats of the Kentucky House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans held control of both chambers. Because the Kentucky legislature can override gubernatorial vetoes with a simple majority vote, Republicans have a veto-proof majority in the state legislature.[12]

Maine[edit]

All of the seats of the Maine Senate and the Maine House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Democrats held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Massachusetts[edit]

All of the seats of the Massachusetts Senate and the Massachusetts House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Democrats retained control of both chambers.

Michigan[edit]

All of the seats of the Michigan House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. The Michigan Senate did not hold regularly-scheduled elections in 2020. Republicans maintained control of the house of representatives.

House of Representatives
Party Before After Change
Republican 58 58 Steady
Democratic 52 52 Steady
Total 110 110

Minnesota[edit]

All of the seats of the Minnesota Senate and the Minnesota House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans maintained control of the senate, while Democrats maintained control of the house of representatives.

Missouri[edit]

Half of the seats of the Missouri Senate and all of the seats of the Missouri House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Montana[edit]

Half of the seats of the Montana Senate and all of the seats of the Montana House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans held control of both chambers, and also gained a government trifecta by winning the 2020 Montana gubernatorial election.

Nebraska[edit]

Nebraska is the only U.S. state with a unicameral legislature; half of the seats of the Nebraska Legislature were up for election in 2020. Nebraska is also unique in that its legislature is officially non-partisan and holds non-partisan elections, although the Democratic and Republican parties each endorse legislative candidates.

Legislature
Party Before After Change
Republican 30 32 Increase 2
Democratic 18 17 Decrease 1
Independent 1 0 Decrease 1
Total 49 49

Nevada[edit]

Half of the seats of the Nevada Senate and all of the seats of the Nevada Assembly were up for election in 2020. Democrats held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

New Hampshire[edit]

All of the seats of the New Hampshire Senate and the New Hampshire House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans gained control of both chambers, establishing a government trifecta.

New Mexico[edit]

All of the seats of the New Mexico Senate and the New Mexico House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Democrats held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

New York[edit]

All of the seats of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly were up for election in 2020. Democrats held control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

North Carolina[edit]

All of the seats of the North Carolina Senate and the North Carolina House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans retained control of both chambers.

North Dakota[edit]

Half of the seats of the North Dakota Senate and the North Dakota House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans retained control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Ohio[edit]

Half of the seats of the Ohio Senate and all of the seats of the Ohio House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans retained control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Oklahoma[edit]

Half of the seats of the Oklahoma Senate and all of the seats of the Oklahoma House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans retained control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Oregon[edit]

Half of the seats of the Oregon State Senate and all of the seats of the Oregon House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Democrats retained control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Pennsylvania[edit]

Half of the seats of the Pennsylvania State Senate and all of the seats of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans retained control of both chambers.

Rhode Island[edit]

All of the seats of the Rhode Island Senate and the Rhode Island House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Democrats retained control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

South Carolina[edit]

All of the seats of the South Carolina Senate and the South Carolina House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans retained control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

South Dakota[edit]

All of the seats of the South Dakota Senate and the South Dakota House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans retained control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Tennessee[edit]

Half of the seats of the Tennessee Senate and all of the seats of the Tennessee House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans retained control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Texas[edit]

Half of the seats of the Texas Senate and all of the seats of the Texas House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans retained control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Utah[edit]

Half of the seats of the Utah State Senate and all of the seats of the Utah House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans retained control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Vermont[edit]

All of the seats of the Vermont Senate and the Vermont House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Democrats retained control of both chambers.

Washington[edit]

Half of the seats of the Washington State Senate and all of the seats of the Washington House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Democrats retained control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

West Virginia[edit]

Half of the seats of the West Virginia Senate and all of the seats of the West Virginia House of Delegates were up for election in 2020. Republicans retained control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Wisconsin[edit]

Half of the seats of the Wisconsin State Senate and all of the seats of the Wisconsin State Assembly were up for election in 2020. Republicans retained control of both chambers.

Wyoming[edit]

Half of the seats of the Wyoming Senate and all of the seats of the Wyoming House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Republicans retained control of both chambers, maintaining a government trifecta.

Territorial and federal district summaries[edit]

American Samoa[edit]

All of the seats of the American Samoa Senate and the American Samoa House of Representatives are up for election. Members of the senate serve four-year terms, while members of the house of representative serve two-year terms. Gubernatorial and legislative elections are conducted on a nonpartisan basis in American Samoa.

Guam[edit]

All of the seats of the unicameral Legislature of Guam are up for election. All members of the legislature serve a two-year term.

Legislature
Party Before After Change
Democratic 10 8 Decrease 2
Republican 5 7 Increase 2
Total 15 15

Northern Mariana Islands[edit]

A portion of the seats of the Northern Mariana Islands Senate, and all of the seats of the Northern Mariana Islands House of Representatives, are up for election. Members of the senate serve either four-year terms, while members of the house serve two-year terms.

Puerto Rico[edit]

All of the seats of the Senate of Puerto Rico and the House of Representatives of Puerto Rico are up for election in 2020. Members of the Senate and the House of Representatives both serve four-year terms. The New Progressive Party lost control of both chambers, although the Popular Democratic Party only managed to gain majority control in the House due to the number of third party candidates elected.

U.S. Virgin Islands[edit]

All of the seats of the unicameral Legislature of the Virgin Islands are up for election in 2020. All members of the legislature serve a two-year term.

Legislature
Party Before After Change
Democratic 13 10 Decrease 3
Independent 2 5 Increase 3
Total 15 15

Washington, D.C.[edit]

The Council of the District of Columbia serves as the legislative branch of the federal district of Washington, D.C. Half of the council seats are up for election in 2020. Council members serve four-year terms. Democrats retained supermajority control of the council.

Council
Party Before After Change
Democratic 11 11 Steady
Independent 2 2 Steady
Total 13 13

Table of partisan control[edit]

Prior to the 2020 elections, Republicans control approximately 60 percent of the state legislative chambers and 52 percent of the state legislative seats in the United States.[1] Nationwide, approximately 40 percent of the population of the United States (including federal districts and territories) live in states with Republican control of the state government, 37 percent live in states with Democratic control, and 22 percent live in states with divided government.[f]

This table shows the partisan control of governor's offices and state legislative chambers in each state. In situations where one party controls the governor's office and both legislative chambers (known as a "government trifecta"),[15] that party is marked as having "overall" control of the state. Otherwise, overall control of the state is marked as being divided.

Subdivision[16][17] Before 2020 elections[18][g] After 2020 elections
Subdivision PVI % Pop. Governor Upper house Lower house Overall Governor Upper house Lower house Overall
 
Alabama R+14 1.48 Rep Rep 27–8 Rep 75–28 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Alaska R+9 0.22 Rep Rep 13–7 Coal. 22–17[a] Div Rep Rep Coal. Div
Arizona R+5 2.19 Rep Rep 17–13 Rep 31–29 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Arkansas R+15 0.91 Rep Rep 26–9 Rep 75–23 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
California D+12 11.91 Dem Dem 29–11 Dem 61–17–1 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
Colorado D+1 1.74 Dem Dem 19–16 Dem 41–24 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
Connecticut D+6 1.07 Dem Dem 22–14 Dem 91–60 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
Delaware D+6 0.29 Dem Dem 12–9 Dem 26–15 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
Florida R+2 6.47 Rep Rep 23–17 Rep 73–46 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Georgia R+5 3.2 Rep Rep 35–21 Rep 105–75 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Hawaii D+18 0.43 Dem Dem 24–1 Dem 46–5 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
Idaho R+19 0.54 Rep Rep 28–7 Rep 56–14 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Illinois D+7 3.82 Dem Dem 40–19 Dem 73–44 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
Indiana R+9 2.03 Rep Rep 40–10 Rep 67–33 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Iowa R+3 0.95 Rep Rep 32–18 Rep 53–47 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Kansas R+13 0.88 Dem Rep 29–11 Rep 84–41 Div Dem Rep Rep Div
Kentucky R+15 1.35 Dem Rep 28–10 Rep 62–38 Div Dem Rep Rep Div
Louisiana R+11 1.4 Dem Rep 27–12 Rep 68–35–2 Div Dem Rep Rep Div
Maine D+3 0.41 Dem Dem 21–14 Dem 88–57–6 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
Maryland D+12 1.82 Rep Dem 32–14 Dem 99–42 Div Rep Dem Dem Div
Massachusetts D+12 2.09 Rep Dem 36–4 Dem 127–31–1 Div Rep Dem Dem Div
Michigan D+1 3.01 Dem Rep 22–16 Rep 58–51 Div Dem Rep Rep Div
Minnesota D+1 1.7 Dem Rep 35–32 Dem 75–59 Div Dem Rep Dem Div
Mississippi R+9 0.9 Rep Rep 36–16 Rep 76–45–1 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Missouri R+9 1.85 Rep Rep 23–8 Rep 113–48 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Montana R+11 0.32 Dem Rep 30–20 Rep 57–43 Div Rep Rep Rep Rep
Nebraska R+14 0.58 Rep NP[h] N/A[h] Rep NP[h] N/A[h]
Nevada D+1 0.93 Dem Dem 13–8 Dem 29–13 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
New Hampshire Even 0.41 Rep Dem 14–10 Dem 231–158–1 Div Rep Rep Rep Rep
New Jersey D+7 2.68 Dem Dem 25–15 Dem 52–28 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
New Mexico D+3 0.63 Dem Dem 26–16 Dem 45–24 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
New York D+11 5.86 Dem Dem 40–20 Dem 103–42–1 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
North Carolina R+3 3.16 Dem Rep 28–21 Rep 64–55 Div Dem Rep Rep Div
North Dakota R+17 0.23 Rep Rep 37–10 Rep 79–15 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Ohio R+3 3.52 Rep Rep 24–9 Rep 61–38 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Oklahoma R+20 1.19 Rep Rep 38–9 Rep 77–23 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Oregon D+5 1.27 Dem Dem 18–12 Dem 38–22 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
Pennsylvania Even 3.86 Dem Rep 28–21–1 Rep 109–93 Div Dem Rep Rep Div
Rhode Island D+10 0.32 Dem Dem 33–5 Dem 66–9 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
South Carolina R+8 1.55 Rep Rep 27–19 Rep 78–44 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
South Dakota R+14 0.27 Rep Rep 30–5 Rep 59–11 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Tennessee R+14 2.06 Rep Rep 28–5 Rep 73–26 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Texas R+8 8.74 Rep Rep 19–11 Rep 84–66 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Utah R+20 0.97 Rep Rep 23–6 Rep 59–16 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Vermont D+15 0.19 Rep Dem 22–6–1 Dem 94–44–12 Div Rep Dem Dem Div
Virginia D+1 2.57 Dem Dem 21–19 Dem 55–45 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
Washington D+7 2.29 Dem Dem 29–20 Dem 57–41 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
West Virginia R+20 0.54 Rep Rep 20–14 Rep 58–41–1 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Wisconsin Even 1.75 Dem Rep 18–13 Rep 63–35 Div Dem Rep Rep Div
Wyoming R+25 0.17 Rep Rep 27–3 Rep 50–9–1 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
U.S. states N/A 98.71 Rep 26–24 Rep 30–19 Rep 28–21[i] Rep 20–15[j] Rep 27–23 Rep 31–18 Rep 29–20 Rep 22–15
Washington, D.C. D+43 0.21 Dem[k] Dem[k] Dem Dem Dem Dem
American Samoa N/A 0.02 NP/D[l] NP NP NP NP/D[l] NP NP NP
Guam 0.05 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
N. Mariana Islands 0.02 Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep Div Div
Puerto Rico 0.96 PNP/R[m] PNP PNP PNP PNP/D Div PDP Div
U.S. Virgin Islands 0.03 Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
United States Even 100 28–28 Rep 31–22[n] Rep 30–20 Rep 21–18 28–28 Rep 32–21[n] Rep 29–20 Rep 22–18
Subdivision PVI % Pop. Governor Upper house Lower house Overall Governor Upper house Lower house Overall
Subdivision Before 2020 elections After 2020 elections

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c The Alaska House of Representatives is controlled by a coalition of Democrats, Republicans, and independents. The minority caucus consists of Republicans who are not part of the majority coalition.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h The upper houses of Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Minnesota, New Jersey, and Texas use a 2-4-4 term length system.
  3. ^ a b c These figures represent the seats of Nebraska's unicameral legislature.
  4. ^ Consists of 15 Democrats, 5 Republicans, and 2 Independents.
  5. ^ Consists of 15 Democrats, 3 Republicans, and 4 Independents.
  6. ^ The remaining portion of the U.S. population lives in Nebraska or American Samoa (which have non-partisan legislatures), or Puerto Rico, where the PNP has a trifecta.
  7. ^ Partisan seat figures were compiled in August 2020.
  8. ^ a b c d Nebraska has a unicameral, officially non-partisan legislature. For this reason, Nebraska is not included in the overall tallies of partisan control (except for governor) and the overall control column is labeled as "N/A".
  9. ^ Republicans controlled the lower house in 29 states, Democrats controlled the lower house in 20 states, and one state, Alaska, had a lower house controlled by a coalition.
  10. ^ Republicans held a trifecta in 20 states, Democrats held a trifecta in 15 states, and 14 states had a divided government.
  11. ^ a b Washington, D.C., does not elect a governor or state legislature, but it does elect a mayor and a city council.
  12. ^ a b Although elections for governor of American Samoa are non-partisan, Governor Lolo Matalasi Moliga has affiliated with the Democratic Party at the national level since re-election in 2016. He is counted as a Democrat for the overall tally.
  13. ^ Puerto Rican Governor Wanda Vázquez Garced is a member of the Puerto Rican New Progressive Party and affiliates with the Republican Party at the national level. She is counted as a Republican in the overall tally.
  14. ^ a b The upper house tally includes the unicameral legislatures of Washington, D.C., Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Panetta, Grace (April 16, 2020). "The coronavirus crisis is drastically changing the battle for state legislatures and could completely reshape who controls Congress". Business Insider. Archived from the original on July 20, 2020. Retrieved July 20, 2020.
  2. ^ Demsas, Jerusalem (November 5, 2020). "Democrats fail to make gains in state legislative races in advance of 2021 redistricting". Vox. Retrieved November 17, 2020.
  3. ^ Mutnick, Ally; Rodriguez, Sabrina (November 4, 2020). "'A decade of power': Statehouse wins position GOP to dominate redistricting". Politico. Retrieved November 17, 2020.
  4. ^ Berman, Russell (November 10, 2020). "The Failure That Could Haunt Democrats for a Decade". The Atlantic. Retrieved November 17, 2020.
  5. ^ Brown-Kaiser, Liz; Caldwell, Leigh Ann (November 10, 2020). "Democrats blame increased Trump turnout, uphill races for failure to win state legislative seats". NBC News. Retrieved November 17, 2020.
  6. ^ Gabriel, Trip (November 27, 2020). "How Democrats Suffered Crushing Down-Ballot Losses Across America". The New York Times.
  7. ^ McCausland, Phil (November 13, 2020). "Democrats gear up to fight gerrymandering after state House losses". NBC News. Retrieved November 17, 2020.
  8. ^ a b c "2020 Legislative Races by State and Legislative Chamber". National Conference of State Legislatures.
  9. ^ Jacobson, Louis (July 22, 2020). "July Update: Handicapping the 2020 State Legislature Races". Cook Political Report.
  10. ^ Nuttycombe, Chaz (May 7, 2020). "The State of the States: The Legislatures". University of Virginia Center for Politics.
  11. ^ Wilson, Reid (February 15, 2019). "Alaska House elects a Speaker after more than a month of gridlock". The Hill.
  12. ^ Barton, Ryland (April 14, 2020). "Kentucky Legislature Returns Tuesday To Consider Overriding Beshear Vetoes". WFPL News.
  13. ^ "Northern Mariana Islands Senate". Ballotpedia. November 4, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2021.
  14. ^ "Northern Mariana Islands House of Representatives". Ballotpedia. November 4, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2021.
  15. ^ Rabinowitz, Kate; Still, Ashlyn (November 17, 2019). "Democrats are dominating state-level races". Washington Post.
  16. ^ Coleman, Miles. "2016 State PVI Changes". Decision Desk HQ. Archived from the original on October 14, 2017. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  17. ^ "Population, Population Change, and Estimated Components of Population Change: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019 (NST-EST2019-alldata)". Census.gov. United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 26, 2020. Retrieved February 8, 2020.
  18. ^ "2020 State & Legislative Partisan Composition" (PDF). National Conference of State Legislatures. August 1, 2020.