Page semi-protected

2020 World Rally Championship

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

2020 FIA World Rally Championship
Previous: 2019 Next: 2021
Support series:
FIA World Rally Championship-2
FIA World Rally Championship-3
FIA Junior World Rally Championship
Elfyn Evans is the current drivers' championship leader.
Scott Martin is the current co-drivers' championship leader.
Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT (Yaris WRC pictured) are the current manufacturers' championship leader.

The 2020 FIA World Rally Championship is the forty-eighth season of the World Rally Championship, an auto racing competition recognised by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) as the highest class of international rallying. Teams and crews are due to compete in fourteen rallies for the World Rally Championships for Drivers, Co-drivers and Manufacturers. Crews are free to compete in cars complying with World Rally Car and Group R regulations; however, only manufacturers competing with World Rally Cars homologated under regulations introduced in 2017 are eligible to score points in the Manufacturers' championship. The championship is due to begin in January 2020 with the Rallye Monte Carlo and conclude in November 2020 with Rally Japan.[1][2] The series will be supported by the World Rally Championship-2, World Rally Championship-3 and Junior World Rally Championship categories at selected events.[3]

Ott Tänak and Martin Järveoja are the defending Drivers' and Co-drivers' Champions, having secured their maiden titles at the 2019 Rally Catalunya.[4] Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT, the team Tänak and Järveoja will compete for, are the defending Manufacturers' Champions.[5][a] Hyundai won their maiden manufacturers' title when the final round of the 2019 championship was cancelled.[7]

After the second round, Elfyn Evans and Scott Martin lead drivers' and co-drivers' championships for the first time in their careers as they achieve an extra podium finish than second-place Thierry Neuville and Nicolas Gilsoul despite the fact that they are level on 42 points. Sébastien Ogier and Julien Ingrassia are third, a slender five points behind. In the manufacturers' championship, Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT holds a ten-point lead over Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT.

Calendar

A map showing the locations of the rallies in the 2020 championship. Event headquarters are marked with a black dot.

The 2020 championship is due to be contested over thirteen rounds in Europe, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, North and South America and Oceania.[1][2]

Round Start date Finish date Rally Rally headquarters Surface Stages Distance Ref.
1 23 January 26 January Monaco Rallye Automobile Monte Carlo Gap, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur Mixed[b] 16 304.28 km [8]
2 13 February 16 February Sweden Rally Sweden Torsby, Värmland Snow 11 171.64 km[c] [10]
3 12 March 15 March Mexico Rally Guanajuato México León, Guanajuato Gravel 24 324.85 km [11]
N/A N/A Chile Rally Chile Concepción, Biobío Gravel Cancelled[d] [12]
4 23 April 26 April Argentina Rally Argentina Villa Carlos Paz, Córdoba Gravel TBA TBA
5 21 May 24 May Portugal Rally de Portugal Matosinhos, Porto Gravel TBA TBA
6 4 June 7 June Italy Rally Italia Sardegna Alghero, Sardinia Gravel TBA TBA
7 16 July 19 July Kenya Safari Rally Kenya Nairobi, Nairobi County Gravel TBA TBA
8 6 August 9 August Finland Rally Finland Jyväskylä, Central Finland Gravel TBA TBA
9 3 September 6 September New Zealand Rally New Zealand Auckland, Auckland Region Gravel TBA TBA
10 24 September 27 September Turkey Rally of Turkey Marmaris, Muğla Gravel TBA TBA
11 15 October 18 October Germany ADAC Rallye Deutschland Bostalsee, Saarland Tarmac TBA TBA
12 29 October 1 November United Kingdom Wales Rally GB Llandudno, Conwy Gravel TBA TBA
13 19 November 22 November Japan Rally Japan Nagoya, Chūbu Tarmac TBA TBA
Source:[1][2][13][14][15][16]

Calendar changes

With the addition of Rally Chile to the calendar in 2019, the FIA opened the tender process for new events to join the championship in 2020.[17] Bids to revive Rally Japan and the Safari Rally were received, and candidate events were run in 2019.[18][19] Both events were accepted to the 2020 calendar, as was a proposal to revive Rally New Zealand.[1]

  • The Safari Rally will be run as a World Championship event for the first time since 2002. The event will be based in the Kenyan capital Nairobi and feature stages around Lake Naivasha.[15] In contrast to the event's traditional endurance format, which featured stages hundreds of kilometres long, the 2020 Safari Rally will follow a compact route to comply with FIA regulations mandating the maximum route distance.
  • Rally Japan returns to the calendar for the first time since 2010, replacing Rally Australia as the final round of the championship. The rally will move away from its original headquarters in Hokkaidō to a new base in Nagoya and will be run on tarmac rather than gravel.[14]
  • Rally New Zealand will return to the calendar for the first time since 2012. The event will return to Auckland.[1]

The addition of these events saw the Tour de Corse and the Rallies of Catalunya and Australia removed from the calendar.[2] Organisers of Rally Catalunya agreed to forfeit their place on the 2020 calendar as part of a rotation system that will see European events host rallies in two out of three calendar years. The Tour de Corse was removed in response to concerns from teams about the logistics of visiting Corsica, while Rally Australia was removed as the event's base in a regional centre rather than a major metropolitan area meant that the rally struggled to attract spectators.[2] Rally Chile was included on the original calendar, but was later cancelled in the face of ongoing political unrest in the country.[12] The FIA responded to the cancellation by seeking a replacement event to ensure that the calendar retained its planned fourteen rounds,[20] but were unable to do so.[16]

Route changes

Prior to the Rally Sweden, it was confirmed that the route for the rally had to be shortened due to a lack of snow.[9]

Entries

The following teams and crews are under contract to contest the 2020 championship.[e] Ford, Hyundai and Toyota are all represented by manufacturer teams and eligible to score points in the FIA World Rally Championship for Manufacturers. All competitors use tyres supplied by Michelin.[21]

World Rally Car entries eligible to score manufacturer points
Entrant Car No. Driver name Co-driver name Rounds
South Korea Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 6[22] Spain Dani Sordo Spain Carlos del Barrio TBA
8 Estonia Ott Tänak Estonia Martin Järveoja 1–2
9 France Sébastien Loeb Monaco Daniel Elena 1
11 Belgium Thierry Neuville Belgium Nicolas Gilsoul 1–2
16 Republic of Ireland Craig Breen Republic of Ireland Paul Nagle 2
United Kingdom M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC 3 Finland Teemu Suninen Finland Jarmo Lehtinen 1–2
4 Finland Esapekka Lappi Finland Janne Ferm 1–2
44 United Kingdom Gus Greensmith United Kingdom Elliott Edmondson 1
Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC 17 France Sébastien Ogier France Julien Ingrassia 1–2
33 United Kingdom Elfyn Evans United Kingdom Scott Martin 1–2
69 Finland Kalle Rovanperä Finland Jonne Halttunen 1–2
Sources:[23][24]
World Rally Car entries ineligible to score manufacturer points
Entrant Car No. Driver name Co-driver name Rounds
Finland Latvala Motorsport Toyota Yaris WRC 10 Finland Jari-Matti Latvala Finland Juho Hänninen 2
Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC 18 Japan Takamoto Katsuta United Kingdom Daniel Barritt 1–2
United Kingdom M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC 19 Lithuania Deividas Jocius Lithuania Mindaugas Varža 2
40 1
TBA TBA TBA France Pierre-Louis Loubet France Vincent Landais TBA
Sources:[23][24]

Summary

Citroën (C3 WRC pictured) withdrew from the championship.

Reigning World Champions Ott Tänak and Martin Järveoja left Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT and moved to Hyundai Motorsport.[6] The Estonian pair chose not to compete with the number 1,[25] which may only be used by the defending champions.[26] Thierry Neuville and Nicolas Gilsoul remained with Hyundai, marking their seventh season with the team.[27] Sébastien Loeb and Daniel Elena also renewed their contracts with the team.[28] Loeb and Elena will contest the championship on a part-time basis, sharing their car with the crew of Dani Sordo and Carlos del Barrio.[29] Crews led by Andreas Mikkelsen and Craig Breen were left without drives.[30] Hyundai announced that they could form a second team for Breen and Mikkelsen to contest selected rallies,[30] and later entered Breen in Rally Sweden.[31]

The Citroën World Rally Team had committed to entering two full-time entries instead of three, continuing the policy they introduced in 2019. Sébastien Ogier and Esapekka Lappi were under contract to lead the team's crews until the team announced that they would withdraw from the championship with immediate effect. Citroën cited Ogier's decision to leave the team as the reason for withdrawing,[32][f] but pledged support for independent teams competing with the R5 variant of the Citroën C3 WRC in the championship's support categories.[33] The company also expressed a willingness to sell or rent their C3 WRCs to teams looking to compete in the sport's premier category.[34]

Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT will feature an entirely new line-up in 2020.[35] Sébastien Ogier and Julien Ingrassia will replace Ott Tänak and Martin Jarveojä, while Elfyn Evans and Scott Martin were recruited from M-Sport Ford WRT. Reigning World Rally Championship-2 Pro champions Kalle Rovanperä and Jonne Halttunen will make their competitive début in Toyota's third car. Toyota will enter an additional two cars for Jari-Matti Latvala and Takamoto Katsuta on a part-time basis.[36][37] Katsuta will contest all of the European rallies under the Toyota Gazoo Racing name while Latvala will contest two events—with further starts depending on his budget—as an independent entrant.[36] Former Toyota Gazoo Racing driver Juho Hänninen will be Latvala's co-driver, replacing Miikka Anttila.[38] Anttila moved to the World Rally Championship-3, partnering Eerik Pietarinen.[24] Kris Meeke remained under contract with the team,[39] but stepped back from full-time competition.[40]

M-Sport Ford WRT continued their policy of entering two crews on a full-time basis and a third crew contesting selected rounds. Teemu Suninen and Jarmo Lehtinen were retained,[41] while Esapekka Lappi and Janne Ferm replaced Evans and Martin in the team's second car.[42] Gus Greensmith and Elliott Edmondson, who contested three rounds of the 2019 championship with the team, will contest an expanded programme of nine rounds in 2020.[42]

Reigning World Rally Championship-2 champions Pierre-Louis Loubet and Vincent Landais are expected to make their début in a World Rally Car during the year.[43] Loubet will combine his World Rally Championship programme with a factory-supported drive in the World Rally Championship-2.[44]

Regulation changes

Sporting regulations

The eligibility requirements for crews entering events will be simplified and streamlined into a system called the "FIA Rally Pyramid".[3] The top tier of the sport, known as "Rally 1" will be for World Rally Cars built to regulations introduced in 2017. The second tier, "Rally 2", will be for manufacturer teams and professional independent teams entering R5 cars in the World Rally Championship-2. This will be followed by "Rally 3" for privately-entered and "gentlemen driver" crews competing with R5 cars in the World Rally Championship-3. "Rally 4" entries will not contest their own dedicated championship, but will instead serve as a bridging category aimed at making the step from R2 to R5 more manageable by allowing R2 entries to be equipped with four-wheel drive. The final tier, "Rally 5", will be for crews entering R2 cars in the Junior World Rally Championship.[3]

Season report

Opening rounds

The 2020 FIA World Rally Championship kicked off in Monaco following a series of crew changes, including reigning world champions Ott Tänak and Martin Järveoja's shocking move to Hyundai.[6] However, just on the fourth stage of Monte Carlo Rally, they suffered a high-speed crash; their Hyundai i20 flying off a 40-metre high cliff at 180 km/h (111.8 mph), rolling end-over-end through a series of trees before landing on the road below — with both driver and co-driver remarkably walking away uninjured.[45] Following the Estonian crew's huge crash, the pressure were all down to teammates Thierry Neuville and Nicolas Gilsoul. Despite posting an astonishing time at Thursday night, the Belgian crew still lost their lead to Toyota rivals, six-time world champions Sébastien Ogier and Julien Ingrassia, and teammates Elfyn Evans and Scott Martin, on Friday.[46][47] But the Hyundai crew found their form back on Saturday, winning seven out of the eight final stages, including the Power Stage victory, to seal the Monte Carlo rally for the first time in their careers.[48] As a result, the Belgain crew became the road sweeper in the Rally Sweden, which made them struggle throughout the weekend, especially considering the rally was shortened due to a lack of snow.[9] They rally was eventually won by Evans and Martin. The Toyota crew dominated the rally, winning five stages out of nine, to seal the victory — the second for Evans, the first for Martin — to lead both drivers' and co-drivers' standings for the first time in their careers.[49] One more surprise came from the youngster Kalle Rovanperä. The Finn took his first stage win by winning the Power Stage alongside his co-driver Jonne Halttunen as well as achieve their maiden podium finish. At the age of nineteen, Rovanperä became the youngest driver ever to claim a WRC podium finish.[49] After a strong weekend, Toyota took an early lead in the manufacturers' championship, ten points ahead of defending manufacturer champions Hyundai.[49]

Results and standings

Season summary

Round Event Winning driver Winning co-driver Winning entrant Winning time Report Ref.
1 Monaco Rallye Automobile Monte Carlo Belgium Thierry Neuville Belgium Nicolas Gilsoul South Korea Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT 3:10:57.6 Report [50]
2 Sweden Rally Sweden United Kingdom Elfyn Evans United Kingdom Scott Martin Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT 1:11:43.1 Report [51]
3 Mexico Rally Guanajuato México Report
4 Argentina Rally Argentina Report
5 Portugal Rally de Portugal Report
6 Italy Rally Italia Sardegna Report
7 Kenya Safari Rally Kenya Report
8 Finland Rally Finland Report
9 New Zealand Rally New Zealand Report
10 Turkey Marmaris Rally of Turkey Report
11 Germany ADAC Rallye Deutschland Report
12 United Kingdom Wales Rally GB Report
13 Japan Rally Japan Report

Scoring system

Points were awarded to the top ten classified finishers in each event. In the manufacturers' championship, teams were eligible to nominate three crews to score points, but these points were only awarded to the top two classified finishers representing a manufacturer and driving a 2017-specification World Rally Car. There were also five bonus points awarded to the winners of the Power Stage, four points for second place, three for third, two for fourth and one for fifth. Power Stage points were only awarded in the drivers' and co-drivers' championships.

Position 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th
Points 25 18 15 12 10 8 6 4 2 1

FIA World Rally Championship for Drivers

Pos. Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
MEX
Mexico
ARG
Argentina
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
SAF
Kenya
FIN
Finland
NZL
New Zealand
TUR
Turkey
DEU
Germany
GBR
United Kingdom
JPN
Japan
Points
1 United Kingdom Elfyn Evans 34 1 42
2 Belgium Thierry Neuville 11 62 42
3 France Sébastien Ogier 22 43 37
4 Finland Kalle Rovanperä 5 31 30
5 Finland Esapekka Lappi 45 55 24
6 Estonia Ott Tänak Ret 24 20
7 Finland Teemu Suninen 83 8 11
8 France Sébastien Loeb 6 8
9 Japan Takamoto Katsuta 7 9 8
10 Republic of Ireland Craig Breen 7 6
11 France Eric Camilli 9 2
12 Norway Mads Østberg 10 12 1
13 Finland Jari Huttunen 10 1
Pos. Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
MEX
Mexico
ARG
Argentina
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
SAF
Kenya
FIN
Finland
NZL
New Zealand
TUR
Turkey
DEU
Germany
GBR
United Kingdom
JPN
Japan
Points
Source:[52]
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Black Excluded (EX)
Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Cancelled (C)
Blank Withdrew entry from
the event (WD)

Notes:
1 2 3 4 5 – Power Stage position

FIA World Rally Championship for Co-Drivers

Pos. Co-Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
MEX
Mexico
ARG
Argentina
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
SAF
Kenya
FIN
Finland
NZL
New Zealand
TUR
Turkey
DEU
Germany
GBR
United Kingdom
JPN
Japan
Points
1 United Kingdom Scott Martin 34 1 42
2 Belgium Nicolas Gilsoul 11 62 42
3 France Julien Ingrassia 22 43 37
4 Finland Jonne Halttunen 5 31 30
5 Finland Janne Ferm 45 55 24
6 Estonia Martin Järveoja Ret 24 20
7 Finland Jarmo Lehtinen 83 8 11
8 Monaco Daniel Elena 6 8
9 United Kingdom Daniel Barritt 7 9 8
10 Republic of Ireland Paul Nagle 7 6
11 France François-Xavier Buresi 9 2
12 Norway Torstein Eriksen 10 12 1
13 Finland Mikko Lukka 10 1
Pos. Co-Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
MEX
Mexico
ARG
Argentina
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
SAF
Kenya
FIN
Finland
NZL
New Zealand
TUR
Turkey
DEU
Germany
GBR
United Kingdom
JPN
Japan
Points
Source:[52]
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Black Excluded (EX)
Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Cancelled (C)
Blank Withdrew entry from
the event (WD)

Notes:
1 2 3 4 5 – Power Stage position

FIA World Rally Championship for Manufacturers

Only the best two results of each manufacturer at each rally are taken into account for the World Manufacturers’ Championship

Pos. Manufacturer MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
MEX
Mexico
ARG
Argentina
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
SAF
Kenya
FIN
Finland
NZL
New Zealand
TUR
Turkey
DEU
Germany
GBR
United Kingdom
JPN
Japan
Points
1 Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT 2 1 73
3 3
2 South Korea Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT 1 2 63
5 5
3 United Kingdom M-Sport Ford WRT 4 4 40
6 6
Pos. Manufacturer MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
MEX
Mexico
ARG
Argentina
POR
Portugal
ITA
Italy
SAF
Kenya
FIN
Finland
NZL
New Zealand
TUR
Turkey
DEU
Germany
GBR
United Kingdom
JPN
Japan
Points
Source:[52]
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Black Excluded (EX)
Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Cancelled (C)
Blank Withdrew entry from
the event (WD)

Notes

  1. ^ Tänak and Järveoja won their titles with Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT but left the team to join Hyundai for the 2020 championship.[6]
  2. ^ The Monte Carlo Rally is run on a tarmac and snow surface.
  3. ^ The route of Rally Sweden was shortened from 301.26 km over 19 stages to 9 stages totalling 148.55 km. The route was shortened due to a lack of snow and bad weather conditions.[9]
  4. ^ Rally Chile was cancelled due to political unrest.[12]
  5. ^ Every crew that enters a World Rally Championship event—including World Rally Championship-2, World Rally Championship-3, Junior World Rally Championship and privateer entries—is eligible to score points in the World Championship for Drivers and the World Championship for Co-Drivers.
  6. ^ Citroën had previously announced that they would withdraw at the end of the 2021 championship, co-inciding with the planned introduction of hybrid powertrains. The planned withdrawal was attributed to Citroën's existing partnership with Formula E team Techeetah.[33]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Herrero, Daniel (27 September 2019). "Australia drops off WRC calendar in 2020". speedcafe.com. Speedcafe. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e Evans, David (27 September 2019). "WRC drops Corsica, Spain and Australia, three events return for 2020". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  3. ^ a b c Evans, David (8 October 2019). "FIA steps up plan to simplify WRC into five-tier career ladder". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 8 October 2019.
  4. ^ Barry, Luke (27 October 2019). "WRC Spain: Toyota's Tanak takes '19 title, Neuville wins for Hyundai". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 28 October 2019.
  5. ^ "Hyundai celebrates title". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 13 November 2019. Retrieved 13 November 2019.
  6. ^ a b c "Tänak quits Toyota". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 31 October 2019. Retrieved 31 October 2019.
  7. ^ Howard, Tom (12 November 2019). "UPDATE: Rally Australia cancelled due to bushfires". speedcafe.com. Speedcafe. Retrieved 12 November 2019.
  8. ^ "88th Rallye Monte-Carlo". acm.mc. Automobile Club de Monaco. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  9. ^ a b c "Green light for Rally Sweden". rallysweden.com. Rally Sweden. Retrieved 6 February 2020.
  10. ^ "The race". rallysweden.com. Rally Sweden. Retrieved 6 February 2020.
  11. ^ "ItineraryMx20" (PDF). rallymexico.com. Rally Mexico. Retrieved 18 February 2020.
  12. ^ a b c Evans, David (29 November 2019). "WRC's 2020 Rally Chile cancelled due to political and social unrest". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 30 November 2019.
  13. ^ "WRC Calendar". wrc.com.
  14. ^ a b "Three new rounds in 2020 WRC calendar". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 27 September 2019. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  15. ^ a b "Safari back in 2020". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 27 September 2019. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  16. ^ a b "Calendar changes confirmed". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 20 January 2020. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  17. ^ "FIA announces World Motor Sport Council decisions". fia.com. Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. 12 October 2018. Retrieved 12 October 2018.
  18. ^ Evans, David (8 April 2019). "FIA visits Japan and Kenya in next step for WRC returns in 2020". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 5 May 2019.
  19. ^ Evans, David (2 July 2019). "Safari Rally could officially return in WRC calendar vote this week". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 3 July 2019.
  20. ^ Evans, David (16 December 2019). "Rally Chile replacement call unclear, could be made during 2020 WRC". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 2 January 2020.
  21. ^ Evans, David (20 December 2019). "Pirelli wins tyre tender to supply WRC top tier and R5s from 2021". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 10 January 2020.
  22. ^ "Hyundai Motorsport sets its sights on both WRC titles in 2020". Hyundai Motorsport. 14 January 2020.
  23. ^ a b "88e Rallye Automobile Monte-Carlo Entry List" (PDF). acm.mc. Automobile Club de Monaco. 13 January 2020. Retrieved 13 January 2020.
  24. ^ a b c "Rally Sweden 2020 Entry List" (PDF). rallysweden.com. Rally Sweden. 27 January 2020. Retrieved 27 January 2020.
  25. ^ "Champ Ott shuns #1 at Hyundai". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 13 January 2020. Retrieved 13 January 2020.
  26. ^ "2019 FIA World Rally Championship Sporting Regulations" (PDF). Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. 12 December 2018. p. 22. Archived from the original on 27 July 2019.
  27. ^ "Neuville signs new Hyundai deal". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 12 September 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  28. ^ "Loeb joins Hyundai". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 13 December 2018. Retrieved 15 October 2019.
  29. ^ "Sordo extends Hyundai contract". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 9 October 2019. Retrieved 15 October 2019.
  30. ^ a b Evans, David (10 December 2019). "Hyundai could run second WRC team for exiles Breen, Mikkelsen". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 10 December 2019.
  31. ^ Evans, David (27 January 2020). "Hyundai gives Breen "career lifeline" WRC Rally Sweden outing". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 27 January 2020.
  32. ^ Evans, David (20 November 2019). "Citroen ends WRC programme, cites Ogier's exit as reason". motorsport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 20 November 2019.
  33. ^ a b Evans, David (15 November 2019). "Citroen won't be part of World Rally Championship hybrid era in 2022". motorsport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 15 November 2019.
  34. ^ Evans, David (3 December 2019). "Citroen's WRC cars could be bought or rented after its WRC exit for 2020". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 10 January 2020.
  35. ^ "Toyota reveals 2020 line-up". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 27 November 2019. Retrieved 27 November 2019.
  36. ^ a b Evans, David (29 November 2019). "Latvala could get five-round 2020 WRC deal in a Toyota Yaris". motorsport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 29 November 2019.
  37. ^ Klein, Jamie (14 December 2019). "Toyota hands Katsuta eight WRC starts for 2020". motorsport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  38. ^ Evans, David; Benyon, Jack (14 January 2020). "Ex-WRC driver Haninen to co-drive for Latvala on 2020 Rally Sweden". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 14 January 2020.
  39. ^ Evans, David (6 December 2019). "Kris Meeke facing uncertain future after Toyota WRC exit". motorsport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 7 December 2019.
  40. ^ Lillo, Sergio; Evans, David (9 January 2020). "Meeke accepts full-time WRC career is over, now exploring options". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 10 January 2020.
  41. ^ "Eight drivers, one seat". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 30 November 2019. Retrieved 7 December 2019. With Hyundai Motorsport and Toyota Gazoo Racing having finalised their line-ups for 2020, the last remaining factory car untaken is the Ford Fiesta next to Teemu Suninen's in M-Sport's workshop.
  42. ^ a b Evans, David (2 January 2020). "Citroen WRC exile Lappi joins M-Sport alongside Suninen and Greensmith". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 2 January 2020.
  43. ^ "Loubet set for World Rally Car début". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. Retrieved 13 January 2020.
  44. ^ Benyon, Jack (28 January 2020). "Hyundai expands junior driver programme into WRC". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 29 January 2020.
  45. ^ "SS4/5: Evans leads, Tänak crashes". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 24 January 2020. Retrieved 25 January 2020.
  46. ^ "Neuville fires early warning to Monte rivals". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 24 January 2020. Retrieved 24 January 2020.
  47. ^ "Advantage Evans in Monte-Carlo Thriller". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 25 January 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2020.
  48. ^ "Neuville seals revenge win in Monte-Carlo". wrc.com. WRC. 26 January 2020. Retrieved 27 January 2020.
  49. ^ a b c "Evans completes Rally Sweden". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 16 February 2020. Retrieved 17 February 2020.
  50. ^ Hansford, Rob (26 January 2020). "Rally Monte Carlo WRC: Neuville wins thrilling season-opener". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 27 January 2020.
  51. ^ Brunsdon, Stephen (16 February 2020). "Rally Sweden WRC: Dominant Evans wins on second start for Toyota". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 16 February 2020.
  52. ^ a b c "Championship standings 2020". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. Retrieved 26 January 2020.

External links