2020 coronavirus pandemic in Tennessee

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
2020 coronavirus pandemic in Tennessee
COVID-19 Cases in Tennessee by counties.svg
Map of cases by county as of April 3
  1–9
  10–49
  50–99
  100–249
  > 250
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationTennessee, U.S.
Index caseWilliamson County
Arrival dateMarch 5, 2020
Confirmed cases3,067
Recovered248
Deaths
37
Official website
www.tn.gov/governor/covid-19.html

The 2019–20 coronavirus pandemic was confirmed to have reached the U.S. state of Tennessee on March 5, 2020.

Timeline[edit]

Animated map of the spread of coronavirus starting March 11

On March 5, the first case of COVID-19 was reported in Tennessee, in Williamson County. The patient is a 44-year-old adult man and resident of Williamson County who recently flew on a nonstop flight to Boston through Nashville's airport.[1]

The University of Tennessee reported its first confirmed case of COVID-19 on March 22. The case involved a staff member of the university and was confirmed by the Knox County Health Department.[2]

On March 26, Middle Tennessee State University confirmed an on-campus student tested positive for COVID-19 and is being supported by MTSU Student Health Services.[3]

As of April 3, 2:00 PM CT, the Tennessee Department of Health has confirmed 3,067 cases of COVID-19 in the state.[4] On March 20, the first death was reported in Nashville.[5]

Confirmed cases by date[edit]

2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases in Tennessee[4]
Date Cases Total Deaths
Apr 3 3067 37
Apr 2 2845 32
Apr 1 2683 24
Mar 31 2239 21
Mar 30 1834 13
Mar 29 1537 7
Mar 28 1373 6
Mar 27 1203 6
Mar 26 957 3
Mar 25 784 3
Mar 24 667 2
Mar 23 615 2
Mar 22 505 2
Mar 21 371 1
Mar 20 228 1
Mar 19 154 0
Mar 18 98 0
Mar 17 73 0
Mar 16 52 0
Mar 15 39 0
Mar 14 32 0
Mar 13 26 0
Mar 12 18 0
Mar 11 9 0
Mar 10 7 0
Mar 9 4 0
Mar 8 3 0
Mar 7 2-3 0

Government response[edit]

A half-empty shelf in the laundry detergent aisle at Kroger in Springfield.

On March 5, Governor Bill Lee reported the state's first case: a man in his 40s in Williamson County who had recently traveled outside the state.[6]

On March 12, Governor Lee issued Executive Order No. 14 to declare a State of Emergency until it expires on May 11. The order allows pharmacists to dispense an additional 30-day prescription provided it is to prevent the spread of the virus, allows for alternate COVID-19 testing sites provided that the Tennessee Medical Laboratory Board is notified, restricts an excessive price increase of items and services until March 27, suspends maximum size limitations for vehicles participating in preventing the spread of the virus, and gives the Tennessee Commissioner of Human Services the ability to waive child care requirements as needed.[7]

A long line of customers at Publix in Smyrna.

On March 13, the Tennessee Supreme Court under Chief Justice Jeff Bivins issued a State of Emergency order applying to the Tennessee judicial branch. The order suspended in-person proceedings until March 31, and extended statutes of limitations and orders of protection that would expire on April 5 or before to April 6.[8] Additionally, Governor Lee banned traveling be state employees for non-essential government business, while also banning visitors and tours in Nashville.[9][failed verification] The Tennessee General Assembly also banned the public from the legislative Cordell Hull Office complex with only members, staff, and media allowed.[10]

On March 16, Nashville mayor John Cooper announced that bars will close across the county and imposed limitations on restaurants.[11]

On March 23, Memphis mayor Jim Strickland and Shelby County mayor Lee Harris issued executive orders to take effect 6:00 PM, March 24, requiring residents to remain at home unless they serve essential services.[12] The list of essential services is broad.[13]

The state has gradually become more transparent in its reporting. Tennessee began its struggle against the COVID-19 pandemic by refusing to reveal the counties where infected victims lived. On March 10 they began revealing such information, but they still hid information regarding age and gender; now such information is published daily. On March 31 the state decided to reveal the number of negative cases in each county. Governor Lee also signed an executive order allowing local governments to meet remotely after the GOP-dominated legislature failed to do so.[14]

Impact on sports[edit]

On March 12, the National Basketball Association announced the season would be suspended for 30 days, affecting the Memphis Grizzlies.[15] In the National Hockey League, the season was suspended for an indefinite amount of time, affecting the Nashville Predators.[16] The National Collegiate Athletic Association cancelled all winter and spring tournaments, most notably the Division I men's and women's basketball tournaments, affecting colleges and universities statewide.[17] On March 16, the National Junior College Athletic Association also canceled the remainder of the winter seasons as well as the spring seasons.[18]

Statistics[edit]

COVID-19 cases in Tennessee, United States  ()
     Deaths        Active cases
Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-03-08
3(n.a.) 0
2020-03-09
4(+33%) 0
2020-03-10
7(+75%) 0
2020-03-11
9(+29%) 0
2020-03-12
18(+100%) 0
2020-03-13
26(+44%) 0
2020-03-14
32(+23%) 0
2020-03-15
39(+22%) 0
2020-03-16
52(+33%) 0
2020-03-17
73(+40%) 0
2020-03-18
98(+34%) 0
2020-03-19
154(+57%) 0
2020-03-20
228(+48%) 0
2020-03-21
371(+63%) 0
2020-03-22
505(+36%) 0
2020-03-23
615(+22%) 0
2020-03-24
667(+8%) 2
2020-03-25
784(+18%) 3
2020-03-26
957(+22%) 3
2020-03-27
1,203(+26%) 6
2020-03-28
1,373(+14%) 6
2020-03-29
1,537(+12%) 7
2020-03-30
1,834(+19%) 13
2020-03-31
2,239(+22%) 21
2020-04-01
2,683(+19.8%) 24
2020-04-02
2,845(+6%) 32
2020-04-03
3,067(+7.8%) 37
Cases: The number of cases confirmed in Tennessee.
Sources: tn.gov.

Confirmed cases by county[edit]

2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases in Tennessee[4]

April 3, 2020

County Confirmed

cases

Deaths Recov.
Anderson 10
Bedford 6
Benton 4
Bledsoe 2
Blount 33
Bradley 21
Campbell 4
Cannon 4
Carroll 6
Carter 3
Cheatham 11
Chester 5
Claiborne 2
Clay 1
Cocke 1
Coffee 3
Cumberland 22
Davidson[a] 699-Active[19] 6[19] 103[19]
DeKalb 5
Dickson 21
Dyer 5
Fayette 17
Fentress 1
Franklin 12
Gibson 7
Giles 3
Grainger 3
Greene 16 1
Grundy 11
Hamblen 3
Hamilton 67 3
Hardeman 5
Hardin 2
Hawkins 8 1
Haywood 2
Henry 4
Hickman 1
Houston 1
Humphreys 3
Jackson 3
Jefferson 6
Johnson 2
Knox 98 1
Lauderdale 2
Lawrence 2
Lewis 2
Lincoln 4
Loudon 12
Macon 7
Madison 17
Marion 14 1
Marshall 4
Maury 20
McMinn 3
McNairy 3
Meigs 2
Monroe 5
Montgomery 41
Morgan 2
Obion 2
Overton 2
Perry 2
Polk 1
Putnam 50
Rhea 0
Roane 3
Robertson 51
Rutherford 127 3
Scott 3
Sequatchie 2
Sevier 13
Shelby 640 6
Smith 3
Sullivan 18
Sumner 283 8
Tipton 28
Trousdale 7 1
Unicoi 1
Union 1
Warren 1
Washington 20
Wayne 2
Weakley 1
White 2
Williamson 221 2
Wilson 71
Other[b] 187 1
Pending 103
Total (statewide)      3067 37 248
  1. ^ Nashville and Davidson County have a combined city–county government.
  2. ^ Non-state residents tested

Rate of contagion and age ranges[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kelman, Brett; Ebert, Joel. "Coronavirus case detected in Tennessee: First patient is quarantined in Williamson County". The Tennessean. Retrieved 2020-03-21.
  2. ^ "First confirmed case of COVID-19 in our campus community". The University of Tennessee Knoxville. Retrieved 2020-03-25.
  3. ^ "MARCH 26: From President McPhee: COVID-19 Update". Middle Tennessee State University. Retrieved 2020-03-26.
  4. ^ a b c "Novel Coronavirus". tn.gov. April 2, 2020. Retrieved April 2, 2020.
  5. ^ Nashville health department reports Tennessee's first coronavirus death
  6. ^ Bowles, Laken (March 5, 2020). "Gov. Bill Lee announces first confirmed case of coronavirus in Williamson County". WTVF. Archived from the original on March 5, 2020. Retrieved March 5, 2020.
  7. ^ Executive Order – Lee No. 14 Tennessee Secretary of State
  8. ^ Laken Bowles Tennessee Supreme Court will keep courts open, suspend in-person proceedings amid COVID-19 concerns Mar 13, 2020 WTVF
  9. ^ Lee Closes Capitol, Halts State Travel Over Coronavirus U.S. News & World Report
  10. ^ Tennessee Capitol, legislative office building close to public amid coronavirus concerns The Tennessean
  11. ^ "Coronavirus in Tennessee latest news: Restaurant restrictions, ACMs delayed and 39 confirmed cases in Tennessee". The Tennessean. Retrieved 2020-03-16.
  12. ^ "Memphis' 'safer at home' executive order: What is an essential service?". The Commercial Appeal. Retrieved 2020-03-23.
  13. ^ "Listing of Essential and Nonessential Services". City of Memphis. Retrieved 2020-03-23.
  14. ^ Kruesi, Kimberlee (April 1, 2020). "Tennessee grapples with what to disclose amid virus outbreak". apnews.com. Associated Press. Retrieved April 3, 2020. Lee has also had to take executive action to let local counties and cities meet remotely after the GOP-dominant Legislature failed to do so in the final hours before abruptly passing an emergency spending plan for the upcoming fiscal year and recessing due to coronavirus concerns.
  15. ^ "Silver: NBA hiatus likely to last 'at least' 30 days". ESPN.com. March 12, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  16. ^ NHL statement on coronavirus NHL, March 12, 2020
  17. ^ NCAA cancels remaining winter and spring championships NCAA, March 12, 2020
  18. ^ NJCAA cancels spring sports, basketball nationals amid coronavirus outbreak MLive.com, March 16, 2020
  19. ^ a b c "Daily Metro COVID19 Press Update for 04/03/20". www.asafenashville.org. Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County, Tennessee, Mayor of Nashville John Cooper. April 3, 2020. Retrieved April 3, 2020.

External links[edit]