2020 in spaceflight

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2020 in spaceflight
Computer-Design Drawing for NASA's 2020 Mars Rover.jpg
The Mars 2020 rover is set to launch aboard an Atlas V rocket in 2020.

This article documents expected notable spaceflight events during the year 2020.

Overview[edit]

Plantary exploration[edit]

NASA plans to launch the Mars 2020 rover.[1] ESA and Roscosmos intend to launch the ExoMars 2020 lander and rover.

Human space flight[edit]

China plans to begin construction of the Chinese large modular space station with the launch of the Tianhe Core Cabin Module.

Rocket innovation[edit]

NASA plans to carry out the maiden launch of the Space Launch System.[2] SpaceX hopes to begin orbital testing of its fully reusable two-stage-to-orbit vehicle BFR.[3]

The trend towards cost reduction in access to orbit is expected to continue. Arianespace's Ariane 6 will make its maiden flight, targeting per-satellite launch cost similar to a Falcon 9.[4] Mitsubishi Heavy Industries's H3 launch vehicle, scheduled to enter service this year is to cost the half of H-IIA, its predecessor.[5] The new owner of Sea Launch plans to resume regular flights at a cost of $62-72 million USD.[6] Despite the increasing competition the cost of delivering cargo to the ISS will go up.[7]

Internet satellite constellation[edit]

In early 2020 following the launch of first 300+ satellites OneWeb constellation is expected to become operational[8] and start providing low latency broadband service at speeds of up to 595 megabits per second to customers throughout the United States and its territories.[9] By the end of the year the constellation will grow to 600+ satellites.[citation needed]

Orbital launches[edit]

Date and time (UTC) Rocket Flight number Launch site LSP
Payload
(⚀ = CubeSat)
Operator Orbit Function Decay (UTC) Outcome
Remarks

January[edit]

January (TBD)[10] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States SpaceX CRS-20 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
January (TBD)[11] India PSLV India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India Oceansat-3 ISRO Low Earth Earth observation  
January (TBD)[12] India PSLV-XL India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India Aditya-L1 ISRO Sun–Earth L1 Heliophysics  
January (TBD)[13] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
United Kingdom OneWeb × 34–36
(Kourou flight 3)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  

February[edit]

February (TBD) United States Atlas V 411 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
Europe Solar Orbiter ESA Heliocentric Heliophysics  
February (TBD)[12] India GSLV India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India GSAT-32 ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
February (TBD)[10] Japan H-IIB Japan Tanegashima LA-Y2 Japan MHI
Japan HTV-9 JAXA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
February (TBD)[14] China Long March 3C (?) China ? China CASC
China BeiDou-3 G2Q CNSA Geosynchronous Navigation  
February (TBD)[15] India PSLV India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India HRSAT × 3[15] or 4[12] ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  

March[edit]

March (TBD)[16] United States Atlas V United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States AFSPC 12 / WFOV[17] U.S. Air Force Geosynchronous Missile warning  
March (TBD)[16] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States GPS IIIA-04 U.S. Air Force Medium Earth Navigation  
Q1 (TBD)[20] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Germany ALINA[21] PTScientists Moon transfer Lunar lander  
The Autonomous Landing and Navigation Module (ALINA) will land near the Apollo 17 landing site and deploy two Audi lunar rovers. They will try to locate NASA's Lunar Roving Vehicle and stream images back to Earth using a small 4G base station on ALINA developed by Nokia and Vodafone Germany.[18][19]
Q1 (TBD)[22] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
Argentina SAOCOM 1B[23] CONAE Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Q1 (TBD)[12] India GSLV ? India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India GISAT 2[24] ISRO Geosynchronous Earth observation  
Q1 (TBD)[12] India GSLV ? India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India GSAT-26 ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
Q1 (TBD)[12] India GSLV ? India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India GSAT-27 ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
Q1 (TBD)[20] United States LauncherOne United States Cosmic Girl, Mojave United States Virgin Orbit
United Kingdom Pearl × 16[25] Sky and Space Global / GomSpace Low Earth Communications  
Q1 (TBD)[26][27] Russia Proton-M P4 Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Nauka Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly  
Q1 (TBD)[12] India PSLV-XL India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India IRNSS Ext4 ISRO Geosynchronous Navigation  
Q1 (TBD)[28] Russia Soyuz-2.1a / Fregat Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Glavcosmos
South Korea CAS500-1[29][30] KARI Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Japan ELSA-d[28] Astroscale Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
Q1 (TBD)[31] Russia Soyuz-2.1a Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress MS-14 / 75P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
Q1 (TBD)[32] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
United Kingdom OneWeb × 34–36
(Baikonur flight 5)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
Q1 (TBD)[32] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
United Kingdom OneWeb × 34–36
(Baikonur flight 6)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
Q1 (TBD)[32] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
United Kingdom OneWeb × 34–36
(Baikonur flight 7)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
Q1 (TBD)[32] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
United Kingdom OneWeb × 34–36
(Baikonur flight 8)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
Q1 (TBD)[31] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-K 17 (K1 №5) VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Q1 (TBD)[31] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-K2 14L (K2 №2) VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Second GLONASS-K2 test satellite[33]
Q1 (TBD)[34] Europe Vega VV18 France Kourou ELV France Arianespace
Spain Ingenio[35] Hisdesat Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
France TARANIS[36] CNES Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Q1 (TBD)[34] Europe Vega-C VC01 France Kourou ELV France Arianespace
LARES 2[38] ASI Low Earth Gravitation research, geodesy  
Maiden flight of Vega-C[37]

April[edit]

15 April[31] Russia Soyuz-2.1a Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz MS-16 Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 62/63  
First manned flight of Soyuz-2.1a
April (TBD)[22] United States Atlas V N22 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States Starliner CTS-1 / USCV 2 Boeing / NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS crew transport  
Second operational mission of Starliner, as part of the ISS Crew Transportation Services program.
April (TBD)[39] China Long March 3B China Xichang China CASC
Indonesia Nusantara Satu-2 PSN Geosynchronous Communications  
April (TBD)[14] China Long March 3B / YZ-1 China ? China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M23 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
China BeiDou-3 M24 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  

May[edit]

May (TBD)[34] Russia Soyuz ST-A / Fregat-M France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
France CSO 2[40] French Armed Forces Low Earth Reconnaissance  

June[edit]

June (TBD)[16] United States Atlas V AV-085[1] United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States AFSPC 8 / GSSAP #5[41] US Air Force Geosynchronous Space surveillance  
United States AFSPC 8 / GSSAP #6[41] US Air Force Geosynchronous Space surveillance  
June (TBD)[14] China Long March 3C (?) China ? China CASC
China BeiDou-3 G3Q CNSA Geosynchronous Navigation  
June (TBD)[2] United States SLS Block 1 United States Kennedy LC-39B United States NASA
United States Exploration Mission 1 NASA Selenocentric Technology demo  
United States Near-Earth Asteroid Scout NASA Heliocentric Technology demo  
United States Lunar Flashlight NASA Selenocentric Lunar orbiter  
United States BioSentinel NASA Heliocentric Astrobiology  
United States SkyFire Lockheed Martin Heliocentric Technology demo  
United States Lunar IceCube NASA Selenocentric Lunar orbiter  
United States CuSP NASA Heliocentric Solar research  
United States Lunar Polar Hydrogen Mapper NASA Selenocentric Lunar orbiter  
Japan EQUULEUS UT Earth–Moon L2 Earth observation  
Japan OMOTENASHI JAXA Selenocentric Lunar lander  
Italy ArgoMoon ASI Heliocentric Technology demo  
Q2 (TBD)[12] India GSLV ? India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India GSAT-21 ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
Q2 (TBD)[12] India PSLV-XL India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India IRNSS S3 ISRO Geosynchronous Navigation  
Q2 (TBD)[12] India PSLV India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India RISAT-1B ISRO Low Earth Earth observation  
Q2 (TBD)[31] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-M 761 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Mid 2020 (TBD)[12] India PSLV India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India Oceansat-3A ISRO Low Earth Earth observation  
Mid 2020 (TBD)[31] Russia Soyuz-2.1a Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress MS-15 / 76P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
Q2 (TBD)[32] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
United Kingdom OneWeb × 34–36
(Baikonur flight 9)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
Q2 (TBD)[32] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
United Kingdom OneWeb × 34–36
(Baikonur flight 10)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
Q2 (TBD)[32] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
United Kingdom OneWeb × 34–36
(Baikonur flight 11)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
Q2 (TBD)[32] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
United Kingdom OneWeb × 34–36
(Baikonur flight 12)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  

July[edit]

16 July[34] Europe Ariane 6 France Kourou ELA-4 France Arianespace
United Kingdom OneWeb × 30 OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
Maiden flight of Ariane 6
23 July[14] China Long March 5 China Wenchang LC-1 China CASC
China Mars Global Remote Sensing Orbiter and Small Rover CNSA Areocentric Mars orbiter, lander and rover  
25 July[31] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Khrunichev
Europe / Russia ExoMars 2020 surface platform Roscosmos Heliocentric Mars lander  
Europe Rosalind Franklin ESA Heliocentric Mars rover  
July (TBD)[1] United States Atlas V 541 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States Mars 2020 NASA / JPL Heliocentric Mars rover  
July (TBD)[42] United States Delta IV Heavy United States VAFB SLC-6 United States ULA
United States NROL-82 NRO Polar orbit Reconnaissance  
July (TBD)[43] Japan H-IIA 202 Japan Tanegashima LA-Y1 Japan MHI
United Arab Emirates Mars Hope (Al-Amal) Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre Areocentric Mars orbiter  
July (TBD)[44] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Vostochny Site 1S[45] Russia Roscosmos
Russia Arktika-M N1[46] Roscosmos Molniya Earth observation  

August[edit]

September[edit]

September (TBD)[47] United States Falcon Heavy United States KSC LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States AFSPC-52 Air Force Space Command Geosynchronous Communications (military)  
September (TBD)[14] China ? China ? China CASC
China Brazil CBERS 6 CASC / INPE Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Q3 (TBD)[12] India GSLV ? India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India GSAT-28 ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
Q3 (TBD)[12] India PSLV India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India Cartosat-3B ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
India IMS-2 × 2 ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
India Microsat × 3 ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Q3 (TBD)[48] United States RS1 United States ABL Space Systems
Low Earth Flight test  
maiden flight
Q3 (TBD)[32] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Vostochny Site 1S France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
United Kingdom OneWeb × 34–36
(Vostochny flight 1)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
Q3 (TBD)[32] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Vostochny Site 1S France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
United Kingdom OneWeb × 34–36
(Vostochny flight 2)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
Q3 (TBD)[32] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Vostochny Site 1S France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
United Kingdom OneWeb × 34–36
(Vostochny flight 3)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
Q3 (TBD)[31] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-K 16 (K1 №4) VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
After the initial two prototypes launched in 2011 and 2014, only nine more GLONASS-K1 models will be produced. They will be launched as needed to replace end-of-life GLONASS-M variants.[33]

October[edit]

21 October[31] Russia Soyuz-2.1a Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz MS-17 Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 63/64  
October (TBD)[16] United States Atlas V 411 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States GPS IIIA-05 U.S. Air Force Medium Earth Navigation  
October (TBD) Russia Proton-M / DM-03 Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Elektro-L №4 Roscosmos Geosynchronous Meteorology  
October (TBD)[13] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
United Kingdom OneWeb × 34–36
(Kourou flight 4)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  

November[edit]

November (TBD)[20] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
Germany SARah 1[49] Bundeswehr Low Earth (SSO) Reconnaissance  
November (TBD)[50] United States Falcon 9 United States VAFB SLC-4E United States SpaceX
United States / France Sentinel-6A NASA, NOAA, CNES, Eumetsat Low Earth Earth observation  

December[edit]

December (TBD)[51] United States Atlas V 401 United States VAFB SLC-3E United States ULA
United States Landsat 9 NASA / USGS Low Earth (SSO) Meteorology  
December (TBD)[20] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX
South Korea Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter (KPLO)[52] KARI Selenocentric Lunar orbiter  
South Korea Lunar Impactor[20] KARI Selenocentric Geological research  
December (TBD)[31] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Yamal-501 Gazprom Space Systems Geosynchronous Communications  
Q4 (TBD)[34] Europe Ariane 62 France Kourou ELA-4 France Arianespace
European Union Galileo FOC FM23, FM24 ESA Medium Earth Navigation  
Q4 (TBD)[20] United States Falcon 9 United States LC-39A or SLC-40 United States SpaceX
Turkey Türksat 5A Türksat Geosynchronous Communications  
Q4 (TBD)[53] United States Falcon Heavy United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
Sweden Ovzon-3[53] Ovzon Geosynchronous Communications  
Direct geostationary insertion
Q4 (TBD)[12] India GSLV ? India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India AGISAT ISRO Geosynchronous Earth observation  
Q4 (TBD)[12] India GSLV ? India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India GSAT-7R ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
Q4 (TBD)[12] India GSLV ? India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India GSAT-UHF ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
Q4 (TBD)[12] India PSLV India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India Resourcesat-3 ISRO Low Earth Earth observation  
Q4 (TBD)[12] India PSLV India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India Resourcesat-3SA ISRO Low Earth Earth observation  
Q4 (TBD)[12] India PSLV-XL India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India IRNSS 2A ISRO Geosynchronous Navigation  
Q4 (TBD)[31] Russia Soyuz-2.1a Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress MS-16 / 77P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
Q4 (TBD)[32] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Vostochny Site 1S France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
United Kingdom OneWeb × 34–36
(Vostochny flight 4)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
Q4 (TBD)[32] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Vostochny Site 1S France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
United Kingdom OneWeb × 34–36
(Vostochny flight 5)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
Q4 (TBD)[31] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-K 18 (K1 №6) VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Q4 (TBD)[54] Europe Vega France Kourou ELV France Arianespace
Europe Proba-3 ESA Highly elliptical Technology demonstration / Solar research  

To be determined[edit]

2020 (TBD)[31] Russia Angara A5 / DM-03 (?) Russia Plesetsk Russia RVSN RF
Russia Kosmos (EKS? / 14F154) VKS ? Missile warning  
H1, 2020 (TBD)[55] United States Antares 230 United States MARS LP-0A United States NG Innovation
United States Cygnus NG-13 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
2020 (TBD)[56] Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
Japan BSAT-4b[a] BSAT Geosynchronous Communications  
2020 (TBD)[57] Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
United States Galaxy 30 Intelsat Geosynchronous Communications  
United States MEV-2 NG Innovation Geosynchronous Satellite servicing  
2020 (TBD)[58] Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
Germany H2SAT Heinrich Hertz[a] DLR Geosynchronous Communications  
H2, 2020 (TBD)[57] Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
United States Intelsat (TBD)[a] Intelsat Geosynchronous Communications  
2020 (TBD)[34] Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
United States ViaSat-3 F2[a] ViaSat Geosynchronous Communications  
2020 (TBD)[59] United States Atlas V 531 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States Cygnus[60] Northrop Grumman Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
United States Peregrine[61] Astrobotic Technology Selenocentric Lunar lander  
2020 (TBD)[16] United States Atlas V 551 AV-086[1] United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States AEHF-6[62] U.S. Air Force Geosynchronous Communications (military)  
2020 (TBD)[63] United States Atlas V 552 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States Dream Chaser NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
Dream Chaser first mission
2020 (TBD)[16] United States Delta IV Heavy United States Cape Canaveral SLC-37B United States ULA
United States NROL-68 NRO Geosynchronous Reconnaissance  
2020 (TBD)[64] Japan Epsilon Japan Uchinoura Japan JAXA
Vietnam JV-LOTUSat 1 Vietnam Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
2020 (TBD)[20] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States Crew Dragon USCV-3 SpaceX / NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS crew transport  
Mid 2020 (TBD)[20] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX
Japan Hakuto-R[65] ispace Moon transfer Lunar orbiter  
2020 (TBD)[66] United States Falcon 9 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX
United States SXM 8 Sirius XM Geosynchronous Communications  
2020 (TBD)[43] Japan H-IIA 204 Japan Tanegashima LA-Y1 Japan MHI
United Kingdom Inmarsat-6 F1 Inmarsat Geosynchronous Communications  
2020 (TBD)[67] Japan H3-20 Japan Tanegashima LA-Y2 Japan MHI
Japan ALOS-4 JAXA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Maiden flight of H3 Launch Vehicle
2020 (TBD)[14] China Long March 2F China Jiuquan LA-4 / SLS-1 China CNSA
China Shenzhou 12 CNSA Low Earth Manned spaceflight  
Manned flight
2020 (TBD)[14] China Long March 2F China Jiuquan LA-4 / SLS-1 China CNSA
China Shenzhou 13 CNSA Low Earth Manned spaceflight  
Manned flight
2020 (TBD)[14] China Long March 5 China Wenchang LC-1 China CASC
China Chang'e 6 CNSA Selenocentric Lunar lander  
2020 (TBD)[14] China Long March 5 China Wenchang LC-1 China CASC
China Tianhe CNSA Low Earth Space station assembly  
Tianhe is the foundation element of the Chinese Space Station, providing life support and living quarters for three crew members, and guidance, navigation and attitude control for the station.
2020 (TBD)[14] China Long March 7 China Wenchang LC-2 China CASC
China Tianzhou 2 CNSA Low Earth (CSS) Space logistics  
2020 (TBD)[14] China Long March 7 China Wenchang LC-2 China CASC
China Tianzhou 3 CNSA Low Earth (CSS) Space logistics  
2020 (TBD)[68] China Long March 8 China Wenchang LP-201[68] China CASC
China TBA CASC  
Maiden flight of Long March 8
2020 (TBD)[69] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M P4 Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia United States ILS
Canada Anik G2V Telesat Geosynchronous Communications  
2020 (TBD)[70] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M P4 Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Ekspress AMU-3 RSCC Geosynchronous Communications  
Russia Ekspress AMU-7 RSCC Geosynchronous Communications  
2020 (TBD)[12] India PSLV India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India CCI-Sat ISRO Low Earth Signals intelligence  
2020 (TBD)[71] India PSLV-CA India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
Germany EnMAP DLR / GFZ Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
2020 (TBD)[72] India PSLV-CA India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India Oceansat-3 ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Oceanography  
2020 (TBD)[12] India PSLV India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India RISAT-2A ISRO Low Earth Earth observation  
2020 (TBD)[73] Russia Soyuz-2.1a / Fregat Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Glavcosmos
South Korea CAS500-2[73][74] KARI Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
2020 (TBD)[75] Russia Soyuz-2.1a / Fregat-M Russia Vostochny Site 1S Russia Roscosmos
Russia Kondor-FKA No.1 Roscosmos Low Earth Reconnaissance  
2020 (TBD)[73] Russia Soyuz-2.1a / Fregat Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Glavcosmos
Tunisia Challenger One Telnet Tunisie Low Earth Communications  
2020 (TBD)[75][45] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Vostochny Site 1S Russia Roscosmos
Russia Energia-100 Energia-Telecom Geosynchronous Communications  
2020 (TBD)[76] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Russia Roscosmos
Russia Gonets-M 20[77] Gonets Satellite System Low Earth Communications  
Russia Gonets-M 21 Gonets Satellite System Low Earth Communications  
Russia Gonets-M 22 Gonets Satellite System Low Earth Communications  
2020 (TBD)[78][31] Russia Soyuz-2.1b Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Resurs-P N4 Roscosmos Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
2020 (TBD)[79] Russia Soyuz-2.1b Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Resurs-P N5 Roscosmos Low Earth Earth observation  
2020 (TBD)[31] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Vostochny Site 1S Russia Roscosmos
Russia Zond[80] Roskosmos Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Sweden Scout[81] Spaceflight Industries Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Russia / India Iskra 5[82] MAI, Space Kidz India Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
Russia / South Korea Perseus-O 1-4[83] Dauria / SatByul Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
2020 (TBD)[31] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Vostochny Site 1S Russia Roscosmos
Russia Meteor-M 2-3 Low Earth Meteorology  
Russia Ionosfera-M 1/2 Roskosmos Low Earth Earth observation  
2020 (TBD)[84] Russia Soyuz-2.1b Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Prichal (Progress M-UM) Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly  
2020 (TBD)[85] United States Terran 1 United States Cape Canaveral LC 16 United States Relativity Space
TBA  
Maiden flight
2020 (TBD)[86] United States Vector-R United States MARS LP-0B (?) United States Vector Space Systems
United States Landmapper-HD Astro Digital[87] Low Earth Earth observation  
2020 (TBD)[86] United States Vector-R United States MARS LP-0B (?) United States Vector Space Systems
United Kingdom Open Cosmos 1 ? Low Earth ?  
2020 (TBD)[88] Europe Vega-C France Kourou ELV France Arianespace
Italy COSMO-SkyMed (CSG) 2 ASI Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
2020 (TBD)[89] Ukraine Zenit-3F / Fregat-SB Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 45/1 Russia Roscosmos
Ukraine Lybid 1[90] Ukrkosmos (SSAU) Geosynchronous Communications  

Suborbital flights[edit]

Deep-space rendezvous[edit]

Date (UTC) Spacecraft Event Remarks
29 January Parker Solar Probe 4th perihelion
17 February Juno 25th perijove of Jupiter
10 April Juno 26th perijove
13 April BepiColombo Gravity assist at Earth
2 June Juno 27th perijove
7 June Parker Solar Probe 5th perihelion
11 July Parker Solar Probe Third gravity assist at Venus
25 July Juno 28th perijove
July OSIRIS-REx Touch-and-go maneuver on Bennu for sampling
16 September Juno 29th perijove
27 September Parker Solar Probe 6th perihelion
16 October BepiColombo First gravity assist at Venus
8 November Juno 30th perijove
30 December Juno 31st perijove
December Hayabusa2 Sample return to Earth

Extravehicular activities (EVAs)[edit]

Start Date/Time Duration End Time Spacecraft Crew Remarks

Orbital launch statistics[edit]

By country[edit]

For the purposes of this section, the yearly tally of orbital launches by country assigns each flight to the country of origin of the rocket, not to the launch services provider or the spaceport. For example, Soyuz launches by Arianespace in Kourou are counted under Russia because Soyuz-2 is a Russian rocket.

Country Launches Successes Failures Partial
failures
Remarks

By rocket[edit]

By family[edit]

Family Country Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks

By type[edit]

Rocket Country Family Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks

By configuration[edit]

Rocket Country Type Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks

By spaceport[edit]

Site Country Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks

By orbit[edit]

Orbital regime Launches Achieved Not achieved Accidentally
achieved
Remarks
Transatmospheric 0 0 0 0
Low Earth 0 0 0 0
Geosynchronous / transfer 0 0 0 0
Medium Earth 0 0 0 0
High Earth 0 0 0 0
Heliocentric orbit 0 0 0 0 Including planetary transfer orbits

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Ariane 5 carries two satellites per mission; manifested payloads still need to be paired.

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External links[edit]

Generic references: