2021 Pacific hurricane season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
2021 Pacific hurricane season
2021 Pacific hurricane season summary map.png
Season summary map
Seasonal boundaries
First system formedMay 9, 2021
Last system dissipatedSeason ongoing
Strongest storm
NameFelicia
 • Maximum winds145 mph (230 km/h)
(1-minute sustained)
 • Lowest pressure945 mbar (hPa; 27.91 inHg)
Seasonal statistics
Total depressions17
Total storms17
Hurricanes8
Major hurricanes
(Cat. 3+)
2
Total fatalities12 total
Total damage$235 million (2021 USD)
Related articles
Pacific hurricane seasons
2019, 2020, 2021, 2022, 2023

The 2021 Pacific hurricane season is an ongoing event of the annual tropical cyclone season in the Northern Hemisphere. The season officially began on May 15 in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and on June 1 in the Central Pacific; both will end on November 30. These dates historically describe the period each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Pacific Ocean basin and are adopted by convention. However, the formation of tropical cyclones is possible at any time of the year, as illustrated by the formation of Tropical Storm Andres on May 9, which became the earliest forming tropical storm in the northeastern Pacific proper (east of 140°W longitude) on record. So far, this season has seen four Pacific hurricanes make landfall in Mexico, tying 1996 for the most recorded in one season.[1]

In June, Tropical Storm Dolores made landfall near the border of the Mexican states of Colima and Michoacán, killing three people and resulting in US$50 million[nb 1] in insured losses. Just a week later, Hurricane Enrique paralleled the west coast of Mexico, causing an additional two fatalities and a similar amount of damage. In August, Hurricane Nora made landfall on the state of Jalisco and hugged the Pacific coast of Mexico until dissipating, resulting in an estimated $100 million in damage and three more deaths. Less than two weeks later, Hurricane Olaf made landfall on Baja California Sur as Category 2 hurricane. In October, Hurricane Pamela struck Nayarit at Category 1 intensity, leaving four people missing and severe flooding. Later that month, Hurricane Rick struck near the Michoacán-Guerrero border at peak intensity as a strong Category 2 hurricane.

Seasonal forecasts[edit]

Record Named
storms
Hurricanes Major
hurricanes
Ref
Average (1991–2020): 15 8 4 [2]
Record high activity: 1992: 27 2015: 16 2015: 11 [1]
Record low activity: 2010: 8 2010: 3 2003: 0 [1]
Date Source Named
storms
Hurricanes Major
hurricanes
Ref
May 12, 2021 SMN 14–20 7–10 4–5 [3]
May 20, 2021 NOAA 12–18 5–10 2–5 [4]
Area Named
storms
Hurricanes Major
hurricanes
Ref
Actual activity: EPAC 17 8 2
Actual activity: CPAC 0 0 0
Actual activity: 17 8 2

Forecasts include weekly and monthly changes in important factors that help determine the number of tropical storms, hurricanes, and major hurricanes within a particular year. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the average hurricane season in the Eastern and Central Pacific between 1991 and 2020 contained approximately 15 tropical storms, 8 hurricanes, and 4 major hurricanes. The NOAA generally classifies a season as above average, average, or below average based on the cumulative ACE index, but occasionally the number of tropical storms, hurricanes, and major hurricanes within a hurricane season is also considered. Factors they expected to reduce activity were near- or below-average sea surface temperatures across the eastern Pacific and the El Niño–Southern Oscillation remaining in the neutral phase, with the possibility of a La Niña developing.[4]

On May 12, 2021, the Servicio Meteorológico Nacional issued its forecast for the season, predicting a total of 14–20 named storms, 7–10 hurricanes, and 4–5 major hurricanes to develop.[3] On May 20, 2021, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued their outlook, calling for a below-normal to near-normal season with 12–18 named storms, 5–10 hurricanes, 2–5 major hurricanes, and an accumulated cyclone energy index of 65% to 120% of the median.

Seasonal summary[edit]

Hurricane Rick (2021)Hurricane PamelaHurricane Olaf (2021)Hurricane Nora (2021)Hurricane Enrique (2021)Tropical Storm Dolores (2021)Saffir–Simpson scale
Three tropical cyclones present in the East Pacific simultaneously on August 2. From right to left; Ignacio, Hilda, and a disturbance that would eventually become Jimena.

The Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) index for the 2021 Pacific hurricane season, as of 03:00 UTC October 25, is 90.0925 units in the Eastern Pacific and 0.32 units in the Central Pacific. The total ACE in the basin is 90.4125 units.[nb 2] Broadly speaking, ACE is a measure of the power of a tropical or subtropical storm multiplied by the length of time it existed. It is only calculated for full advisories on specific tropical and subtropical systems reaching or exceeding wind speeds of 39 mph (63 km/h).

Although the hurricane season in the eastern Pacific does not officially begin until May 15, and on June 1 in the central Pacific,[5] activity began early, with Tropical Storm Andres forming on May 9. However it was short-lived, dissipating after encountering unfavorable conditions after two days. After a period of inactivity, Blanca formed, marking only the sixth time since 1949 that two tropical storms developed in the month of May, with the other years being 1956, 1984, 2007, 2012, and 2013.[1] A week after Blanca dissipated, Carlos formed, remaining over open waters and never impacting land. Dolores formed shortly after and peaked as a strong tropical storm before making landfall in Mexico, causing moderate damage throughout the states of Colima and Michoacán, with three people dead. Following Dolores was Enrique, which formed in a similar area but later intensified into a Category 1 hurricane, causing similar impacts and killing two people. After a period of inactivity in the basin, Felicia formed on July 14. It rapidly intensified into the season's first major hurricane two days later, peaking as a Category 4 hurricane. However, it never impacted land. Alongside Felicia was Guillermo, which reached tropical storm status and took a slightly similar path to Felicia but did not strengthen further. Around the end of July, Hurricane Hilda peaked as a Category 1 hurricane while staying well out to sea. A few days later, Tropical Storm Ignacio formed east of Hilda, but its peak was short-lived due to unfavorable conditions. Along with Ignacio, a tropical depression formed which quickly dissipated, however it later regenerated and became Tropical Storm Jimena.

In early August, a tropical depression formed which later became Tropical Storm Kevin. A few days later, another depression formed over the same region, which later became Tropical Storm Linda. Linda would later rapidly intensify to a major hurricane, becoming the fourth hurricane and second major hurricane of the season. A disturbance formed in the Central Pacific, which later entered the West Pacific and became Severe Tropical Storm Omais. Towards the end of the month, the remnants of Hurricane Grace in the North Atlantic entered the basin and reformed into Tropical Storm Marty. However it remained as a short-lived tropical storm and dissipated on August 24. By the next day, another low pressure area formed over the Gulf of Tehuantupec which later intensified into Tropical Storm Nora. It intensified further to a strong Category 1 hurricane on August 27. Despite continued predictions of the cyclone remaining at sea, Nora unexpectedly made landfall over the Mexican state of Jalisco. It skirted the coasts of Nayarit and Sinaloa as a weakening tropical storm and rapidly dissipated on August 30.

September was the least active month of the season since 2010 with only named storm. Tropical Storm Olaf formed. It peaked as a low-end Category 2 hurricane and hit Baja California Peninsula on September 9 and rapidly weakened thereafter. After a month of inactivity, two named storms formed, Hurricane Pamela formed off the coast of Mexico and made landfall in Estacion Dimas, Sinaloa as a Category 1 hurricane on October 14. A week later, Tropical Depression Seventeen-E formed and later became Tropical Storm Rick on the afternoon of October 22.

Systems[edit]

Tropical Storm Andres[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Andres 2021-05-09 2030Z.jpg Andres 2021 track.png
DurationMay 9 – May 11
Peak intensity40 mph (65 km/h) (1-min)  1005 mbar (hPa)

On May 2, a disturbance formed in the eastern pacific from a Convectively Coupled Kelvin Wave (CCKW). The disturbance then moved eastward over the next few days. On May 5, the disturbance slowed down and then became stationary. The disturbance started moving westward again and on the next day (May 6), the disturbance interacted with an easterly gap-wind event. This event created a disorganized low pressure system. Persistent wind shear and the CCKW prevented development of the system. However, on May 8, small bursts of convection caused the system to start improving, and by May 9 at 06:00 UTC, the system had accumulated thunderstorm activity and enough organisation to be classified as a Tropical Depression. The system continued to improve, and 6 hours later (12:00 UTC May 9), the depression strengthened into a tropical storm and received the name "Andres." This point was also the peak intensity of the storm with winds of 40 mph (65 km/h) and a pressure of 1,005 mbar (29.7 inHg). Andres subsequently moved north-northwest mainly due to a weak subtropical ridge and was also confronted with wind shear. This wind shear displaced the northeast part of the storm. Andres persisted until the next day. Wind shear had increased all the way to 30 kn (35 mph) and consequently, Andres weakened into a tropical depression. Andres then turned westward and continued to weaken due to cooler sea surface temperatures and drier air. By 06:00 UTC on May 11, thunderstorm activity had completely stopped and Andres transitioned into a remnant low. The low traveled westward and made a slight turn in the west-southwest direction on May 12 until dissipated completely at 18:00 UTC on that day.[6]

There are no reports of damage or casualties associated with Tropical Storm Andres; however, some other rainstorms associated with Andres produced heavy rainfall in Southwestern Mexico.[7][8][9] Moisture from the storm caused intense rain and even a hailstorm as far east as the State of Mexico, including in the state's capital, Toluca.[9] Vehicles became stranded in floods, some small trees got knocked over, and about 50 houses were damaged by a flooding river.[10][11] 30 cars were also stranded in a flooded parking lot of a church in Metepec.[12]

Tropical Storm Blanca[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Blanca 2021-05-31 2055Z.jpg 02E 2021 track.png
DurationMay 30 – June 3
Peak intensity60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min)  998 mbar (hPa)

On May 24, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) first noted an area of low pressure to develop south of the coast of Mexico for possible tropical cyclogenesis.[13] Four days later, a low-pressure area finally formed a couple of hundred kilometers south of the country.[14] The low was initially embedded within a large monsoon trough and was interacting with another system to its east. However, as it gradually moved west-northwestwards, the system became more organized and better defined, and by 21:00 UTC on May 30, was classified as Tropical Depression Two-E.[15] The depression continued to gradually become more symmetric, despite its displaced low- and mid-level circulations.[16] The next day, Two-E strengthened to a tropical storm and received the name Blanca.[17] A relatively compact cyclone, Blanca quickly gained strength throughout the day of May 31, reaching its peak intensity at 09:00 UTC on June 1 with winds of 60 mph (95 km/h) and a pressure of 998 mb (29.47 inHg).[18] Shortly afterwards, vertical wind shear weakened Blanca as its low level circulation became partially exposed on satellite images later into the day.[19] Blanca continued to weaken on June 2 due to wind shear and the entrainment of dry, stable air into its circulation.[20] Blanca further weakened into a tropical depression later that day.[21] Blanca degenerated into a post-tropical cyclone early on June 4 as thunderstorm activity dissipated completely.[22]

Tropical Storm Carlos[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Carlos 2021-06-13 2145Z.jpg Carlos 2021 track.png
DurationJune 12 – June 16
Peak intensity50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min)  1000 mbar (hPa)

On June 2, the NHC noted the possible development of a low-pressure area located several miles offshore the southwestern coast of Mexico in the next five days.[23] A day later, the low-pressure area formed and was located in favorable conditions.[24] On June 6, the NHC upgraded the low-pressure area's chances of developing into a tropical cyclone to 90%, but the system lacked a well defined low level circulation.[25] However, on June 8, cyclogenesis was no longer expected as a result of limited thunderstorm activity due to dry air and strong wind shear.[26] On June 10, the low-pressure area began producing more thunderstorm activity and was once again monitored for possible cyclogenesis as it traversed favorable environmental conditions.[27] By 21:00 UTC on June 12, it had attained a compact low-level circulation with more developed convection, prompting the NHC to designate the disturbance Tropical Depression Three-E.[28] Six hours later, Three-E strengthened into a tropical storm and was given the name Carlos after satellite imagery indicated improved organization and convective banding on the system.[29] Carlos strengthened gradually throughout June 13, and reached peak intensity around 15:00 UTC with 50 mph (80 km/h) winds and a minimum pressure of 1000 millibars.[30] However, early on June 14, Carlos' organization began to degrade due to very dry air in its proximity and increasing wind shear.[31] Carlos weakened to a tropical depression at 21:00 UTC that day as most of its convection dissipated.[32] Carlos was almost devoid of convection apart from a small convective burst by the next day.[33] On June 16, Carlos degenerated into a remnant low as all of its convection dissipated due to dry air.[34]

Tropical Storm Dolores[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Dolores 2021-06-19 1715Z.jpg Dolores 2021 track.png
DurationJune 18 – June 20
Peak intensity70 mph (110 km/h) (1-min)  990 mbar (hPa)

On June 15, the NHC first marked the possible development of a low-pressure area located several miles offshore southwestern Mexico.[35] A day later, the low-pressure area formed and was producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms. The disturbance was expected to move into conductive environmental conditions over the next couple of days.[36] On June 18 at 09:00 UTC, the NHC assessed it to have strengthened into Tropical Depression Four-E, after a scatterometer pass indicated a closed circulation alongside surrounding convection becoming more well-defined.[37] Six hours later, the storm's convection became even more pronounced, and the depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Dolores as banding features became established.[38] On June 19 at 15:00 UTC, Dolores made landfall over the Michoacán-Colima border according to satellite imagery.[39] As it moved further inland, it rapidly weakened into a depression on June 20 at 03:00 UTC.[40] At 09:00 UTC on the same day, the NHC declared it as a remnant low as the system moved over mountainous terrain.[41]

Hurricane Enrique[edit]

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Enrique 2021-06-27 1755Z.jpg Enrique 2021 track.png
DurationJune 25 – June 30
Peak intensity90 mph (150 km/h) (1-min)  975 mbar (hPa)

On June 22, a westward-moving tropical wave was first noted over Central America.[42] With conductive environmental conditions, the system gradually organized and on June 25 at 09:00 UTC, the NHC assessed the system as a tropical storm,[43] after developing a low-level circulation.[44][43] The storm's structure had further improved six hours later, with prominent banding features to the south and east.[45] Enrique continued to intensify throughout the day, with the NHC assessing the system to have strengthened into a category 1 hurricane by 09:00 UTC on June 26.[46] An area of overshooting cloud tops signaled that the eyewall was developing.[47] However, its structure degraded shortly afterward due to dry air,[48] and by the afternoon hours of June 28, the hurricane to weaken.[49] Six hours later, the NHC downgraded Enrique to a high end tropical storm as the structure continued to deteriorate and had a partially exposed center.[50] On June 30, at 12:00 UTC, the NHC further downgraded Enrique to a tropical depression as its thunderstorms shrunk to a small area of deep convection.[51] On 21:00 UTC that day, Enrique dissipated in the Gulf of California as all of its convection had dissipated.[52]

Two people died from rip currents in Pie de la Cuesta, Guerrero.[53] At least 207 homes were damaged by landslides and winds caused by Enrique in Guerrero.[54] In Lázaro Cárdenas, Michoacán, areas were inundated by more than 50 cm (19 in) of floodwater.[55] A total of 115,904 customers lost power across Jalisco, although 96% of homes returned with power a couple of hours later.[56] A citywide power outage also occurred in Tepic.[57]

Hurricane Felicia[edit]

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Felicia 2021-07-17 1915Z.jpg Felicia 2021 track.png
DurationJuly 14 – July 20
Peak intensity145 mph (230 km/h) (1-min)  945 mbar (hPa)

An disturbance of unclear origin was identified over Central America and the far eastern Pacific on July 9. They system progressed westward over the open ocean during the following days, producing a large area of disorganized deep convection. On July 13, the disturbance's convection became better organized and it developed a defined center of circulation over the course of the day, and Tropical Depression Six-E developed around 00:00 UTC on July 14 roughly 500 nautical miles southwest of Mexico. Six hours later the depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Felicia. Felicia immediately underwent rapid intensification, becoming a hurricane by 06:00 UTC on July 15 as it progressed to the west-northwest. Felicia became a major hurricane the following day, characterized by a very circular shape and symmetric deep convection. The hurricane continued to strengthen albeit at a slower rate on July 17, and reached peak intensity at 12:00 UTC that day with maximum sustained winds of 145 mph (235 km/h) and a minimum barometric pressure of 945 millibars (27.9 inHg). At the time, Felicia had a very small circulation, with hurricane-force winds (74 mph or greater) extending only 15 nautical miles from its eye. After a brief westward turn, Felicia resumed a west-northwestward motion into much more hostile environmental conditions on July 18. The cyclone rapidly weakened, below major hurricane strength by around 00:00 UTC on July 19 and below hurricane strength by 18:00 UTC the same day. Felicia became largely devoid of deep convection late that night and degenerated to a remnant low by 18:00 UTC on July 20 about 1000 nautical miles east of Hawai'i. Low-level wind flow steered the remnant low of Felicia to the west-southwest, and it opened into a trough two days later.[58]

Tropical Storm Guillermo[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Guillermo 2021-07-18 1820Z.jpg Guillermo 2021 track.png
DurationJuly 17 – July 19
Peak intensity60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min)  999 mbar (hPa)

On July 6, a tropical wave moved off the coast of Africa. The system continued to move west and crossed Central America on July 13 – 14 and subsequently moved into the far eastern regions of the Pacific Ocean. The basin itself already had favorable conditions for tropical cyclones, and consequently, the wave began to develop. The system continued moved westward and acquired deep convection along the way. By 00:00 UTC on July 17, the low was organized enough to be classified a tropical depression. The system continued to develop and by 12:00 UTC, the depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Guillermo. Guillermo formed in an environment with very low wind shear and high sea surface temperatures and continued to develop. An area of high pressure over the southwestern United States moved the storm west-northward. The conditions remained conductive for a few days, in which, Guillermo reached peak intensity with winds of 60 mph (95 km/h) and a pressure of 999 mbar (29.5 inHg) at 18:00 UTC on July 18. After attaining peak intensity, seas surface temperatures beneath Guillermo began to dwindle, and wind shear began to rise, which resulted in gradual weakening. Convection began to dissipate because of these conditions and by 00:00 UTC on July 20, the storm transitioned into a remnant low. The low moved faster to the west and west-southwest that day. At 00:00 UTC on July 21, the system was absorbed by a trough, and subsequently, the system had dissipated completely. There were no reports of any damage or casualties associated with the storm.[59]

Hurricane Hilda[edit]

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Hilda 2021-07-31 2110Z.jpg Hilda 2021 track.png
DurationJuly 30 – August 6
Peak intensity85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min)  985 mbar (hPa)

On July 24, a disturbance formed near south of Gulf of Tehuantepec, which was moving parallel to the offshore of southern Mexico.[60] As it moved farther from the coast of Mexico, the disturbance gradually became organized, and on July 28, a low pressure area formed,[61] as satellite imagery showed that the associated shower activity was showing signs of organization.[62] The low-pressure area further organized, with a pair of ASCAT passes showing that the low-pressure area had strengthened significantly and was producing tropical storm-force winds, with the circulation looking well-defined on satellite imagery. On July 30, it was designated as a tropical storm.[63] Hilda intensified to a high-end tropical storm a day later as a central dense overcast developed.[64] Later, Hilda further intensified to a hurricane as a short-lived eye appeared in its central dense overcast.[65] Hilda held a similar appearance the next day, with its center located north of its central dense overcast.[66] Hilda briefly developed a closed mid-level eye the next day, though the low-level and mid-level centers were not stacked due to wind shear.[67] However, it became less organized later that day, with a less distinct eye and an incomplete eyewall.[68] By the next day, Hilda was downgraded to a high-end tropical storm since the eyewall was no longer well-defined, while convection continued to pulse in the southern semicircle.[69] Deep convection continued to wane due to shear, cooler waters, and more stable air.[70] By August 5, Hilda weakened into a tropical depression after a rapid weakening of convection near the center. However, convection resumed pulsing later.[71] On August 6, at 03:00 UTC, Hilda became a post-tropical cyclone, as it became devoid of deep convection due to sub-23 °C (73 °F) sea-surface temperatures.[72][73]

Tropical Storm Jimena[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Jimena 2021-08-05 1945Z.jpg Jimena 2021 track.png
DurationJuly 30 – August 7
Peak intensity40 mph (65 km/h) (1-min)  1005 mbar (hPa)

On July 26, the NHC noted a disturbance located about 700 miles (1,125 km) south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. The system moved parallel to another disturbance which later became Hurricane Hilda.[74] By 21:00 UTC on July 30, the disturbance attained a well-defined center of circulation with sufficient organized convection and was classified as a tropical depression, bearing the designation Nine-E.[75] The depression was initially forecast to become a tropical storm, but failed to do so due to dry air and wind shear caused by nearby Hurricane Hilda. Early on August 1, the system degenerated into a remnant low.[76] Even though Nine-E was a tropical low, the NHC still monitored the system for further development[77] On August 4, it re-intensified into a tropical depression again while maintaining two rainbands in a slightly elongated circulation.[78] On the next day, at 09:00 UTC, the depression intensified into a tropical storm, with the NHC naming it as Jimena, as the storm's deep convection had increased near the low-level center and based on satellite imagery, the storm was producing tropical storm force winds.[79] The convection later diminished on August 6, as it moved over cooler sea-surface temperatures and encountering high wind shear and dry airmass. However, despite all this, Jimena managed its intensity, as it continued to produce tropical storm force winds, based on ASCAT data.[80] A deep convective mass also continued to persist over the center of Jimena.[81] At 21:00 UTC, the NHC issued its last advisory, downgrading the system to a tropical depression as it entered the CPHC's area of responsibility. Its deep convection weakened significantly as it moved over cool sea surface temperatures causing Jimena to weaken.[82] The CPHC later issued its only bulletin for Jimena at 03:00 UTC the next day, stating that Jimena had become a post-tropical cyclone as its deep convection had collapsed completely.[83]

Tropical Storm Ignacio[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Ignacio 2021-08-02 1600Z.jpg Ignacio 2021 track.png
DurationAugust 1 – August 4
Peak intensity40 mph (65 km/h) (1-min)  1004 mbar (hPa)

On July 30 at 00:00 UTC, the NHC began monitoring a disturbance off of the Gulf of Tehuantepec.[84] The system had a poor structure due to high wind shear, but gradually consolidated over time. By August 1, the system developed deep convection and became a tropical depression at 21:00 UTC.[85] The depression intensified into a tropical storm at 15:00 UTC on August 2 as a large burst of convection occurred near the center and accordingly assigned it the name Ignacio. The system was experiencing moderate wind shear at the time.[86] By the next day, Ignacio had weakened into a tropical depression as shear increased, which reduced Ignacio's convection to a weakening cluster of thunderstorms west of its circulation center.[87] On August 4 at 03:00 UTC, Ignacio further degenerated into a remnant low as the system became devoid of deep convection near its center.[88]

Tropical Storm Kevin[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Kevin 2021-08-08 2010Z.jpg Kevin 2021 track.png
DurationAugust 7 – August 12
Peak intensity60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min)  999 mbar (hPa)

On August 5, a disturbance formed a few hundred miles south of the southwestern Mexican coast.[89] The disturbance gradually showed signs of organization on August 6,[90] and on the next day at 03:00 UTC, the well-defined and organized disturbance intensified to a tropical depression, with the NHC designating it as Eleven-E.[91] Three hours later, it further intensified into a tropical storm, with the NHC naming it as Kevin. Banding increased over the southern and western parts of the system's circulation; it also developed a central dense overcast.[92] However, Kevin was affected by persistent wind shear, causing its center to lie to the north of its central dense overcast and most of its convection to be displaced to the southwest.[93] Kevin continued to be affected by wind shear as it moved northwestward.[94] Kevin's convection began to degrade by the next day.[95] On August 12, 09:00 UTC, Kevin was downgraded to a tropical depression, as its remaining convection dissipated, only producing a few small convective bursts.[96] In addition, its low-level center had been displaced 115 mi (185 km) from the actual center.[96] As it moved towards cooler waters, it further degenerated to a remnant low at 15:00 UTC as its convection became too weak and too far from the center for it to be considered a tropical cyclone.[97]

Hurricane Linda[edit]

Category 4 hurricane (SSHWS)
Linda 2021-08-14 2110Z.jpg Linda 2021 track.png
DurationAugust 10 – August 20
Peak intensity130 mph (215 km/h) (1-min)  950 mbar (hPa)

On August 6, an area of disturbed weather formed a few hundred miles from the Gulf of Tehuantepec.[98] On August 9, the low-pressure area became more defined, with satellite imagery showing the system organizing.[99] Following an advanced scatterometer satellite pass at 03:30 UTC that estimated 30–35 mph (45–55 km/h) winds, the NHC classified the system as a tropical depression at 09:00 UTC.[100] Twelve hours later, it intensified into a tropical storm.[101] Although its low-level circulation was initially exposed from the deep convection,[102] Linda continued to strengthen,[103] briefly developing a mid-level eye feature.[104] On the afternoon of August 12, Linda intensified to a Category 1 hurricane.[105] Twenty-four hours later, Linda intensified into a Category 2 hurricane[106] as its convective structure continued to improve. An eye was visible from satellite imagery, though it was quickly obscured by the cloud tops associated with the eyewall convection.[107] Linda strengthened into a Category 3 hurricane six hours later as the eye became more well-defined.[108] At 15:00 UTC of August 14, Linda obtained Category 4 intensity[109] and peaked with a maximum speed of 130 mph (215 km/h) and minimum pressure of 950 mb (28.05 inHg). It also maintained a 17 mi (28 km) wide eye.[110]

Twelve hours later, it weakened into a Category 3 hurricane,[111] as its eye became obscured significantly.[112] On August 15, at 21:00 UTC, Linda further weakened into a Category 2 hurricane, however it became an annular hurricane as it developed a doughnut-like appearance in the satellite imagery and developed a rather large eye.[113] Linda managed its intensity as a Category 2 hurricane for three days, until at 09:00 UTC on August 16, when it was further downgraded to a Category 1 hurricane, as its eyewall started to degrade and its convection had decreased in intensity significantly.[114] However, after encountering warmer ocean temperatures, it re-intensified into a Category 2 hurricane at 03:00 UTC of August 18,[115] as its eyewall strengthened again.[116] Linda again weakened into a Category 1 hurricane at 03:00 UTC, on the next day,[117] as its convection structure started to decay, the eye was displaced to the northeast due to the presence of a moderately westerly wind shear and dry air.[118] At 15:00 UTC the same day, Linda further weakened into tropical storm as its deep convection and eye dissipated completely.[119] On 21:00 UTC, the NHC issued its last bulletin as it entered the Central Pacific, as a weakening tropical cyclone.[120] The CPHC started tracking the storm once it entered the Central Pacific and at 15:00 UTC of August 20, the agency issued its last bulletin declaring as a post tropical cyclone, since all its convection had dissipated.[121] On August 21, Linda developed another convective burst over its center; however, the CPHC did not resume advisories on the system.[122][123] The remnants of the storm later dropped heavy rains from August 22 to August 24 across Hawaii, with 3 to 7 in (76 to 178 mm) falling along western slopes.[124]

Tropical Storm Marty[edit]

Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Marty 2021-08-23 1800Z.jpg Marty 2021 track.png
DurationAugust 23 – August 24
Peak intensity45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)  1002 mbar (hPa)

On August 21, the remnants of Hurricane Grace entered the East Pacific as a large disorganized area of thunderstorms.[125] By the next day, satellite imagery indicated that the system showed signs of organization.[126] At 10:00 UTC on August 23, the remnants of Grace were upgraded to a tropical storm due to a scatterometer pass showing that the circulation of the low-pressure area had become well-defined and produced tropical storm-force winds, with the NHC assigning it the name Marty.[127] At 15:00 UTC of August 24, Marty was downgraded to a tropical depression, as it could not produce any significant convection.[128] Marty was further downgraded to a remnant low at 21:00 UTC, as it was unable to produce any convection for over twelve hours.[129]

Hurricane Nora[edit]

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Nora 2021-08-28 2010Z.jpg Nora 2021 track.png
DurationAugust 25 – August 30
Peak intensity85 mph (140 km/h) (1-min)  977 mbar (hPa)

On August 19, an area of disturbed weather formed west of the southern Mexico coast, which was producing disorganized thunder storms.[130] A day later, the system became better defined and signs of the organization of showers and thunderclouds were also noted.[131] On August 25, at 11:00 UTC the system developed a well-defined circulation as a scatterometer pass showed that it was producing near tropical storm-force winds. Thus, the NHC designated the system as Tropical Depression Fourteen-E.[132] A day later at 17:00 UTC, Fourteen-E intensified into a tropical storm, with the NHC naming it as Nora as its deep convection had organized significantly along with improved curvature of its bands.[133] On August 28, at 11:00 UTC, Nora intensified into a Category 1 hurricane, as its inner core structure became further defined with the formation of a low-level eyewall.[134] Nora made landfall on Jalisco, after which it skirted the coasts of Nayarit and Sinaloa as a weakening storm and rapidly dissipated on August 30 as it moved further inland. It brought considerable damage to Mexico, killing two people and leaving six missing due to a landslide in Cabo Corrientes.[135][136] It had also caused flooding and mudslides. The damage caused by the passage through Nora to the country reached 200 million pesos (US$10 million).[137] Nora's remnants caused heavy rain in Arizona,[138] Colorado, and Utah.[citation needed]

Hurricane Olaf[edit]

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Olaf 2021-09-09 2010Z.jpg Olaf 2021 track.png
DurationSeptember 7 – September 11
Peak intensity100 mph (155 km/h) (1-min)  974 mbar (hPa)

On September 2 at 00:00 UTC, the NHC began monitoring an area of low pressure of the southwestern coast of Mexico.[139] The disturbance then moved north-west and acquired low-level circulation and subsequently upgraded to a tropical depression at 00:00 UTC on September 8.[140][141] At 15:00 UTC on the same day, the storm upgraded to a tropical storm and was given the name Olaf.[142] While moving northwest, the storm's eye became more defined and upgraded to a Category 1 hurricane on September 9 at 15:00 UTC.[143] At 03:00 UTC on September 10, Olaf was upgraded to a Category 2 hurricane; it reached peak intensity at this time with maximum sustained winds of 100 mph (155 km/h) and a minimum barometric pressure of 974 millibars (28.76 inHg). Twenty minutes later, the storm made landfall very near San José del Cabo.[144][145] Shortly after emerging back over water, Olaf rapidly weakened, and it was downgraded to a tropical storm at 15:00 UTC on September 10, with the center becoming exposed.[146][147] By 09:00 UTC on September 11, Olaf become a remnant low as it turned back to the southwest.[148]

Hurricane Pamela[edit]

Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS)
Pamela 2021-10-12 0850Z.jpg Pamela 2021 track.png
DurationOctober 10 – October 14
Peak intensity80 mph (130 km/h) (1-min)  985 mbar (hPa)

At 06:00 UTC on October 7, the NHC began monitoring a tropical wave centered over the southwestern Caribbean Sea for potential development in the Eastern Pacific.[149] The wave crossed Nicaragua and Costa Rica, emerging over the Pacific the next day.[150] Taking a westward track, a broad area of low pressure developed from the wave around 00:00 UTC on October 9.[151] The system remained disorganized until it rapidly consolidated early on October 10,[152] becoming Tropical Depression Sixteen-E at 09:00 UTC, the first active tropical cyclone in the basin in nearly a month.[153] The system strengthened into Tropical Storm Pamela at 21:00 UTC the same day.[154] Low vertical wind shear, warm sea-surface temperature, and a moist environment allowed Pamela to begin rapidly intensifying the following day.[155] After strengthening leveled off for an extended amount of time, Pamela soon resumed intensifying and became a Category 1 hurricane, as the hurricane developed a large area of deep convection.[156] However, dry mid-level air eroded Pamela's deep convection, leaving the low-level center partially exposed and weakened to a high-end tropical storm.[157] On October 13 at 09:00 UTC, the NHC upgraded Pamela back to a minimal hurricane due to increasing deep convection around the center, which suggested strengthening had occur. At 12:00 UTC, Pamela made landfall near Estación Dimas with winds of 75 mph (120 km/h) and a minimum pressure of 987 millibars.[158][159] Pamela caused damage in Nayarit where 4 people are missing. In the municipalities of Acaponeta, Tecuala and Tuxpan, there were floods with water reaching 5 meters high. [160]

Hurricane Rick[edit]

Category 2 hurricane (SSHWS)
Rick 2021-10-24 2015Z.jpg Rick 2021 track.png
DurationOctober 22 – October 26
Peak intensity105 mph (165 km/h) (1-min)  977 mbar (hPa)

On October 19, a disturbance formed south of Central America which was producing poorly organized thunderclouds and gave a medium chance of formation in next five days.[161][162] By October 22, the NHC upgraded to high chance of formation in next two days, as convective activity associated with the disturbance had become better organized.[163][164] At 15:00 UTC of the same day, the NHC upgraded it to a tropical depression and designated it as Seventeen-E, as convective organization had steadily increased in past 24 hours, but still lacked a well-defined LLCC.[165] Six hours later, the NHC upgraded it to a tropical storm and named it Rick. Satellite imagery showed that it had formed a curved band of deep convection.[166] Rick rapidly intensified into a Category 1 hurricane at 15:00 UTC the next day, as its convective structure had rapidly organized with a well-defined low level circulation.[167] At 09:00 UTC of October 25, the NHC upgraded it to a Category 2 hurricane, after a Hurricane Hunter assessed its intensity.[168] Shortly after reaching its peak, it made landfall in Mexico east of Lázaro Cárdenas, Michoacán, at 10:00 UTC.[169][170] Inland, Rick underwent a rapid weakening as it moved northwards over mountainous terrain, as satellite imagery found its convection had completely collapsed with the remaining convection located over the coast.[171] By 03:00 UTC of the next day, Rick became a remnant low as its remaining convection had dissipated completely.[172]

Storm names[edit]

The following names will be used for named storms that form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean during 2021. Retired names, if any, will be announced by the World Meteorological Organization during the joint 44th Sessions of the RA IV Hurricane Committee in the spring of 2022. The names not retired from this list will be used again in the 2027 season.[173] This is the same list used in the 2015 season, with the exception of the name Pamela, which replaced Patricia. The name Pamela was used for the first time this year.

  • Rick
  • Sandra (unused)
  • Terry (unused)
  • Vivian (unused)
  • Waldo (unused)
  • Xina (unused)
  • York (unused)
  • Zelda (unused)

In wake of the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, after the Greek alphabet was deemed too confusing to use, the WMO decided to end the use of the Greek alphabet as an auxiliary list. Therefore, beginning this season, if all 24 names above are used, subsequent storms will take names from a new supplemental naming list, which will allow the names to be retired. The auxiliary list will be used if necessary in all seasons.[174]

For storms that form in the Central Pacific Hurricane Center's area of responsibility, encompassing the area between 140 degrees west and the International Date Line, all names are used in a series of four rotating lists.[175] The next four names that will be slated for use in 2021 are shown below.

  • Hone (unused)
  • Iona (unused)
  • Keli (unused)
  • Lala (unused)

Season effects[edit]

This is a table of all the storms and that have formed in the 2021 Pacific hurricane season. It includes their duration, names, landfall(s), denoted in parentheses, damages, and death totals. Deaths in parentheses are additional and indirect (an example of an indirect death would be a traffic accident), but were still related to that storm. Damage and deaths include totals while the storm was extratropical, a tropical wave, or a low, and all the damage figures are in 2021 USD.

Saffir–Simpson scale
TD TS C1 C2 C3 C4 C5
2021 Pacific hurricane season season statistics
Storm
name
Dates active Storm category

at peak intensity

Max 1-min
wind
mph (km/h)
Min.
press.
(mbar)
Areas affected Damage
(USD)
Deaths Refs


Andres May 9 – 11 Tropical storm 40 (65) 1005 Southwestern Mexico Minimal None [8]
Blanca May 30 – June 3 Tropical storm 60 (95) 998 None None None
Carlos June 12 – 16 Tropical storm 50 (85) 1000 None None None
Dolores June 18 – 20 Tropical storm 70 (110) 990 Southwestern Mexico, Western Mexico $50 million 3 [176][177][178]
Enrique June 25 – 30 Category 1 hurricane 90 (150) 975 Western Mexico, Southwestern Mexico, Baja California Peninsula $50 million 2 [178]
Felicia July 14 – 20 Category 4 hurricane 145 (230) 945 None None None
Guillermo July 17 – 19 Tropical storm 60 (95) 999 Revillagigedo Islands None None
Hilda July 30 – August 6 Category 1 hurricane 85 (140) 985 None None None
Jimena July 30 – August 7 Tropical storm 40 (65) 1005 None None None
Ignacio August 1 – 4 Tropical storm 40 (65) 1004 Revillagigedo Islands None None
Kevin August 7 – 12 Tropical storm 60 (95) 999 Revillagigedo Islands None None
Linda August 10 – 20 Category 4 hurricane 130 (215) 950 Hawaii Minimal None
Marty August 23 – 24 Tropical storm 45 (75) 1002 None None None
Nora August 25 – 30 Category 1 hurricane 85 (140) 977 Western Mexico $125 million 3 [179][135]
Olaf September 7 – 11 Category 2 hurricane 100 (155) 974 Baja California Peninsula $10 million 1 [180]
Pamela October 10 – 14 Category 1 hurricane 80 (130) 985 Revillagigedo Islands, Western Mexico, Baja California Peninsula, Northwestern Mexico, Southwestern United States, Texas Unknown 3
Rick October 22 – 26 Category 2 hurricane 105 (165) 977 Central America, Northwestern Mexico, Western Mexico, Southeastern United States Unknown None
Season aggregates
17 systems May 9 – Season ongoing   145 (230) 945 >$235 million 12  

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ All damage totals are valued as of 2021 and in United States dollars, unless otherwise noted.
  2. ^ The totals represent the sum of the squares for every (sub)tropical storm's intensity of over 33 knots (38 mph, 61 km/h), divided by 10,000. Calculations are provided at Talk:2021 Pacific hurricane season/ACE calcs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d National Hurricane Center; Hurricane Research Division; Central Pacific Hurricane Center. "The Northeast and North Central Pacific hurricane database 1949–2019". United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service. Retrieved 1 October 2020. A guide on how to read the database is available here.
  2. ^ "Background Information: East Pacific Hurricane Season". Climate Prediction Center. College Park, Maryland: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. May 20, 2021. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  3. ^ a b "Pronóstico para la Temporada de Ciclones Tropicales 2021". YouTube.com.
  4. ^ a b "NOAA 2021 Eastern Pacific Hurricane Season Outlook". Climate Prediction Center. May 20, 2021. Archived from the original on May 28, 2020. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  5. ^ Dorst Neal. When is hurricane season? (Report). Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory. Archived from the original on December 6, 2010. Retrieved November 25, 2010.
  6. ^ Stewart, Stacy (June 30, 2021). National Hurricane Center Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Andres (PDF). nhc.noaa.gov (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 29, 2021.
  7. ^ Óscar Barrón (May 9, 2021). "Pronóstico del clima de hoy: se esperan lluvias por depresión tropical UNO-E del Pacífico". Debate (in Spanish). Retrieved May 9, 2021.
  8. ^ a b Juan Antonio Palma (May 7, 2021). "Tormentas y probable formación ciclónica para este fin de semana". Meteored.mx | Meteored (in Spanish). Retrieved May 9, 2021.
  9. ^ a b "SE FORMA ANDRES!". Noticias Va de Nuez (in Spanish). May 9, 2021. Retrieved May 9, 2021.
  10. ^ "Tormenta inunda estacionamiento en Metepec; reportan afectaciones en Toluca". www.msn.com (in Spanish). May 10, 2021. Retrieved May 10, 2021.
  11. ^ "Tormenta de granizo en Toluca deja calles y casas inundadas". EL IMPARCIAL | Noticias de México y el mundo (in Spanish). May 10, 2021. Retrieved May 10, 2021.
  12. ^ "Se adelanta temporada de ciclones". El Heraldo de Aguascalientes (in Spanish). May 10, 2021. Retrieved May 10, 2021.
  13. ^ Andrew S. Latto (May 24, 2021). "Five-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 30, 2021.
  14. ^ John Cangialosi (May 28, 2021). "Five-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 30, 2021.
  15. ^ Stacy R. Stewart (May 30, 2021). "Tropical Depression Two-E Advisory Number 1". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 30, 2021.
  16. ^ Daniel Brown (May 30, 2021). "Tropical Depression Two-E Discussion Number 2". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  17. ^ Stacy R. Stewart (May 31, 2021). "Tropical Storm Blanca Advisory Number 5". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  18. ^ Brad Reinhart; Jack Beven (June 1, 2021). "Tropical Storm Blanca Forecast Discussion Number 7". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 1, 2021.
  19. ^ Philippe Papin; Stacy R. Stewart (June 1, 2021). "Tropical Storm Blanca Forecast Discussion Number 8". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 1, 2021.
  20. ^ Philippe Papin; Stacy R. Stewart (June 2, 2021). "Tropical Storm Blanca Forecast Discussion Number 12". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 2, 2021.
  21. ^ Philippe Papin; Stacy R. Stewart (June 2, 2021). "Tropical Depression Blanca Discussion Number 13". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 2, 2021.
  22. ^ Andrew Latto (June 4, 2021). "Post-Tropical Cyclone Blanca Discussion Number 19". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 4, 2021.
  23. ^ Brad Reinhart; Jack Beven (June 2, 2021). "Five-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  24. ^ John Cangialosi (June 3, 2021). "Five-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  25. ^ John Cangialosi (June 6, 2021). "Five-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  26. ^ Brad Reinhart; Richard Pasch (June 8, 2021). "Five-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  27. ^ Brad Reinhart; Jack Beven (June 10, 2021). "Five-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  28. ^ Andrew Latto (June 12, 2021). "Tropical Depression Three-E Discussion Number 1". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  29. ^ Philippe Papin; Richard Pasch (June 12, 2021). "Tropical Storm Carlos Discussion Number 2". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 13, 2021.
  30. ^ Andrew Latto (June 13, 2021). "Tropical Storm Carlos Discussion Number 4". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 15, 2021.
  31. ^ Stacy R. Stewart (June 14, 2021). "Tropical Storm Carlos Discussion Number 7". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  32. ^ Andrew Latto (June 14, 2021). "Tropical Depression Carlos Discussion Number 9". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 15, 2021.
  33. ^ Brad Reinhart; Richard Pasch (June 14, 2021). "Tropical Depression Carlos Discussion Number 10". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 15, 2021.
  34. ^ Robbie Berg (June 16, 2021). "Post-Tropical Cyclone Carlos Advisory Number 16". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 16, 2021.
  35. ^ Andrew Latto (June 18, 2021). "Five-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 18, 2021.
  36. ^ Robbie Berg (June 18, 2021). "Five-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 18, 2021.
  37. ^ Philippe Papin; Eric Blake (June 18, 2021). "Tropical Depression Four-E Discussion Number 1". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 18, 2021.
  38. ^ Robbie Berg (June 18, 2021). "Tropical Storm Dolores Discussion Number 2". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 18, 2021.
  39. ^ Robbie Berg (June 19, 2021). "Tropical Storm Dolores Discussion Number 6". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  40. ^ Andrew Latto (June 19, 2021). "Tropical Storm Dolores Discussion Number 8". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  41. ^ Brad Reinhart; Eric Blake (June 20, 2021). "Remnants Of Dolores Discussion Number 9". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  42. ^ Robbie Berg (June 22, 2021). "Five-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 25, 2021.
  43. ^ a b Jack Beven (June 25, 2021). "Five-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 25, 2021.
  44. ^ Jack Beven (June 25, 2021). "Tropical Storm Enrique Discussion Number 1". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 25, 2021.
  45. ^ Philippe Papin; John Cangialosi (June 25, 2021). "Tropical Storm Enrique Discussion Number 2". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 25, 2021.
  46. ^ Jack Beven (June 26, 2021). "Hurricane Enrique Forecast Discussion Number 5". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 26, 2021.
  47. ^ Philippe Papin; Stacy Stewart (June 26, 2021). "Hurricane Enrique Discussion Number 6". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 26, 2021.
  48. ^ Philippe Papin; Jack Beven (June 26, 2021). "Hurricane Enrique Discussion Number 7". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 26, 2021.
  49. ^ Philippe Papin; Stacy Stewart (June 28, 2021). "Hurricane Enrique Discussion Number 14". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 28, 2021.
  50. ^ Philippe Papin; Stacy Stewart (June 28, 2021). "Tropical Storm Enrique Discussion Number 15". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 28, 2021.
  51. ^ Richard Pasch (June 30, 2021). "Tropical Storm Enrique Discussion Number 21". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 30, 2021.
  52. ^ Reinhart, Amanda; Brown, Daniel (June 30, 2021). "Remnants of ENRIQUE Advisory Number 23". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved June 30, 2021.
  53. ^ Hugo Valencia (June 26, 2021). "Huracán 'Enrique' causa 2 muertos en las costas de Guerrero". Noticieros Televisa. Retrieved June 27, 2021.
  54. ^ "Huracán Enrique dañó 207 casas y causó 28 derrumbes a su paso por Guerrero". López-Dóriga Digital (in Spanish). June 27, 2021. Retrieved June 27, 2021.
  55. ^ Demos, Editorial; corresponsal, Ernesto Martínez Elorriaga. "La Jornada - Huracán 'Enrique' provoca inundaciones en Lázaro Cárdenas, Michoacán". www.jornada.com.mx (in Spanish). Retrieved June 28, 2021.
  56. ^ Staff, Forbes (June 26, 2021). "CFE restablece suministro eléctrico al 96% de usuarios afectados en Jalisco por tormenta 'Enrique'". Forbes México (in Spanish). Retrieved June 27, 2021.
  57. ^ Demos, Editorial; corresponsal, Myriam Navarro (June 21, 2021). "La Jornada - Huracán 'Enrique' deja inundaciones y daños materiales en Tepic". www.jornada.com.mx (in Spanish). Retrieved June 27, 2021.
  58. ^ Cangialosi, John (September 9, 2021). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Felicia (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 29, 2021.
  59. ^ Stacy Stewart (August 15, 2021). National Hurricane Center Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Guillermo (PDF). nhc.noaa.gov (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 29, 2021.
  60. ^ Eric Blake (July 24, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Cyclone Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved July 30, 2021.
  61. ^ Jack Beven (July 28, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Cyclone Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved July 30, 2021.
  62. ^ Jack Beven (July 28, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Cyclone Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved July 30, 2021.
  63. ^ John Cangialosi (July 30, 2021). "Tropical Storm Hilda Discussion Number 1". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved July 30, 2021.
  64. ^ John Cangialosi (July 31, 2021). "Tropical Storm Hilda Advisory Number 4". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  65. ^ Jack Beven (July 31, 2021). "Hurricane Hilda Discussion Number 6". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  66. ^ Eric Blake (August 1, 2021). "Hurricane Hilda Discussion Number 9". www.nhc.noaa.gov.
  67. ^ Robbie Berg (August 2, 2021). "Hurricane Hilda Discussion Number 11". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  68. ^ Eric Blake (August 2, 2021). "Hurricane Hilda Discussion Number 13". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 3, 2021.
  69. ^ Philippe Papin; Daniel Brown (August 3, 2021). "Tropical Storm Hilda Discussion Number 15". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 3, 2021.
  70. ^ Eric Blake (August 3, 2021). "Tropical Storm Hilda Discussion Number 17". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 3, 2021.
  71. ^ Stacy Stewart (August 5, 2021). "Tropical Depression Hilda Discussion Number 24". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 5, 2021.
  72. ^ Dave Roberts (August 6, 2021). "Post-Tropical Cyclone Hilda Advisory Number 28". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 6, 2021.
  73. ^ Dave Roberts (August 6, 2021). "Post-Tropical Cyclone Hilda Discussion Number 28". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 6, 2021.
  74. ^ Brad Reinhart; Richard Pasch (July 26, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  75. ^ Dave Roberts (July 31, 2021). "Tropical Depression Nine-E Discussion Number 1". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  76. ^ Daniel Brown (August 2, 2021). "Post-Tropical Cyclone Nine-E Advisory Number 7". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  77. ^ Stacy Stewart (August 2, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  78. ^ Eric Blake (August 4, 2021). "Tropical Depression Nine-E Discussion Number 8". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 4, 2021.
  79. ^ Jack Beven (August 4, 2021). "Tropical Storm Jimena Discussion Number 10". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 5, 2021.
  80. ^ Jack Beven (August 6, 2021). "Tropical Storm Jimena Discussion Number 14". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 6, 2021.
  81. ^ Andrew Hagen; Daniel Brown (August 6, 2021). "Tropical Storm Jimena Discussion Number 15". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 6, 2021.
  82. ^ Andrew Hagen; Daniel Brown (August 6, 2021). "Tropical Storm Jimena Discussion Number 16". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  83. ^ Derek Wroe (August 7, 2021). "Tropical Storm Jimena Discussion Number 17". nhc.noaa.gov. Honolulu, Hawaii: Central Pacific Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  84. ^ Jack Beven (July 30, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  85. ^ Stacy Stewart (August 1, 2021). "Tropical Depression Ten-E Discussion Number 1". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  86. ^ Stacy Stewart (August 2, 2021). "Tropical Storm Ignacio Advisory Number 4". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  87. ^ Stacy Stewart (August 3, 2021). "Tropical Depression Ignacio Discussion Number 8". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 3, 2021.
  88. ^ Richard Pasch (August 3, 2021). "Post-Tropical Cyclone Ignacio Discussion Number 10". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 3, 2021.
  89. ^ Jack Beven (August 5, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Cyclone Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 8, 2021.
  90. ^ John Cangialosi (August 6, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Cyclone Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 8, 2021.
  91. ^ Dave Roberts (August 7, 2021). "Tropical Depression Eleven-E Discussion Number 1". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 8, 2021.
  92. ^ Daniel Browns (August 7, 2021). "Tropical Storm Kevin Discussion Number 2". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 8, 2021.
  93. ^ Brad Reinhart; Richard Pasch (August 9, 2021). "Tropical Storm Kevin Discussion Number 8". nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 9, 2021.
  94. ^ Latto, Andrew (August 10, 2021). "Tropical Storm Kevin Discussion Number 13". nhc.noaa.gov. Retrieved August 10, 2021.
  95. ^ Dave Roberts (August 11, 2021). "Tropical Storm Kevin Discussion Number 16". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Retrieved August 11, 2021.
  96. ^ a b Brad Reinhart; John Cangialosi (August 12, 2021). "Tropical Storm Kevin Advisory Number 8". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 12, 2021.
  97. ^ Robbie Berg (August 12, 2021). "Tropical Storm Kevin Advisory Number 21". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 13, 2021.
  98. ^ Dave Roberts (August 6, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Cyclone Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 10, 2021.
  99. ^ Stacy Stewart (August 9, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Cyclone Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 10, 2021.
  100. ^ Brad Reinhart; Richard Pasch (August 10, 2021). "Tropical Depression Twelve-E Discussion Number 1". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 10, 2021.
  101. ^ Andrew Latto (August 10, 2021). "Tropical Storm Linda Advisory Number 3". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 11, 2021.
  102. ^ Andrew Latto (August 10, 2021). "Tropical Storm Linda Discussion Number 3". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 11, 2021.
  103. ^ Robbie Berg (August 11, 2021). "Tropical Storm Linda Discussion Number 6". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Retrieved August 11, 2021.
  104. ^ Robbie Berg (August 11, 2021). "Tropical Storm Linda Discussion Number 7". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 11, 2021.
  105. ^ Robbie Berg (August 12, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Advisory Number 10". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 13, 2021.
  106. ^ David Zelinsky (August 13, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Advisory Number 14". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 13, 2021.
  107. ^ David Zelinsky (August 13, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Discussion Number 14". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 13, 2021.
  108. ^ Michael Brennan; Phillippe Papin (August 13, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Discussion Number 15". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 13, 2021.
  109. ^ Richard Pasch (August 14, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Advisory Number 18". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 14, 2021.
  110. ^ Richard Pasch (August 14, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Forecast/Advisory Number 18". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 17, 2021.
  111. ^ Dave Roberts (August 14, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Advisory Number 20". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 17, 2021.
  112. ^ Dave Roberts (August 14, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Discussion Number 20". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 17, 2021.
  113. ^ Robbie Berg (August 15, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Discussion Number 23". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 17, 2021.
  114. ^ Dave Roberts (August 16, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Discussion Number 29". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 18, 2021.
  115. ^ Philippe Papin; Daniel Brown (August 18, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Advisory Number 32". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 18, 2021.
  116. ^ Philippe Papin; Daniel Brown (August 18, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Discussion Number 32". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 18, 2021.
  117. ^ Philippe Papin; Jack Beven (August 19, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Advisory Number 36". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 19, 2021.
  118. ^ Philippe Papin; Jack Beven (August 19, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Discussion Number 36". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 19, 2021.
  119. ^ Andrew Latto (August 19, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Discussion Number 38". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 21, 2021.
  120. ^ Andrew Latto (August 19, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Discussion Number 39". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 21, 2021.
  121. ^ Tom Birchard (August 20, 2021). "Hurricane Linda Discussion Number 42". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Honolulu, Hawaii: Central Pacific Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 21, 2021.
  122. ^ Eric Webb [@webberweather] (August 21, 2021). "Remnants of #Linda made a come back today & it has likely redeveloped into a TC again w/ persistent/deep convection near a closed, well-defined low-lvl center. While it hasnt been mentioned by the CPHC, some direct impacts are possible in the Hawaiian islands early this week" (Tweet). Retrieved August 29, 2021 – via Twitter.
  123. ^ NWSHonolulu [@NWSHonolulu] (August 22, 2021). "A remnant low (formerly Tropical Cyclone Linda) will bring active weather to the islands this evening through Monday night. Here are the latest forecast updates. #hiwx" (Tweet). Retrieved August 29, 2021 – via Twitter.
  124. ^ "Precipitation Summaries".
  125. ^ Andrew Latto (August 21, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Cyclone Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 23, 2021.
  126. ^ Dave Roberts (August 22, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Cyclone Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 23, 2021.
  127. ^ Daniel Browns (August 23, 2021). "Tropical Storm Marty Discussion Number 1". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 23, 2021.
  128. ^ Stacy Stewart (August 24, 2021). "Tropical Depression Marty Discussion Number 6". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 25, 2021.
  129. ^ Stacy Stewart (August 24, 2021). "Tropical Depression Marty Discussion Number 7". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 25, 2021.
  130. ^ Brad Reinhart; Richard Pasch (August 23, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 28, 2021.
  131. ^ Stacy Stewart (August 24, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 28, 2021.
  132. ^ Robbie Berg (August 25, 2021). "Tropical Depression Fourteen-E Discussion Number 1". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 28, 2021.
  133. ^ Robbie Berg (August 25, 2021). "Tropical Storm Nora Discussion Number 4". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 28, 2021.
  134. ^ Philippe Papin; Jack Beven (August 28, 2021). "Hurricane Nora Discussion Number 11". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved August 28, 2021.
  135. ^ a b "Tropical Storm Nora fading, after leaving 1 dead, 7 missing". 30 August 2021.
  136. ^ "Hallan cuerpo de pescador desaparecido en Acapulco; faltan 5 tras paso del huracán Nora".
  137. ^ "Another storm expected to move up the coast of Puerto Vallarta this week". 6 September 2021.
  138. ^ Corrado, Brent (August 31, 2021). "Remnants of Hurricane Nora bring rain to Arizona; Flash Flood Watches issued". KSAZ-TV. Phoenix, Arizona: Fox Broadcasting Company. Associated Press. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  139. ^ Daniel Brown (September 2, 2021). "Tropical Weather Outlook". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 7, 2021.
  140. ^ Philippe Papin (September 7, 2021). "Tropical Weather Outlook". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 7, 2021.
  141. ^ Andrew Latto (September 7, 2021). "Tropical Weather Outlook". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 7, 2021.
  142. ^ Andrew Latto (September 8, 2021). "Tropical Weather Outlook". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 8, 2021.
  143. ^ David Zelinsky (September 9, 2021). "Tropical Weather Outlook". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 9, 2021.
  144. ^ Jack Beven (September 9, 2021). "Hurricane Olaf Discussion Number 10". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 11, 2021.
  145. ^ Robbie Berg (September 9, 2021). "Hurricane Olaf Tropical Cyclone Update". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 10, 2021.
  146. ^ Brad Reinhart (September 10, 2021). "Tropical Storm Olaf Discussion Number 12". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 11, 2021.
  147. ^ Brad Reinhart (September 10, 2021). "Tropical Storm Olaf Discussion Number 13". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 11, 2021.
  148. ^ Robbie Berg (September 11, 2021). "Post-Tropical Cyclone Olaf Discussion Number 15". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 11, 2021.
  149. ^ John Cangialosi (October 7, 2021). "Tropical Weather Outlook". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  150. ^ Andrew Latto (October 8, 2021). "Tropical Weather Outlook". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  151. ^ Andrew Latto (October 9, 2021). "Tropical Weather Outlook". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  152. ^ Eric Blake (October 10, 2021). "Tropical Weather Outlook". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  153. ^ Philippe Papin (October 10, 2021). "Tropical Depression Sixteen-E Discussion Number 1". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  154. ^ Andrew Latto (October 10, 2021). "Tropical Storm Pamela Discussion Number 3". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  155. ^ Stacy Stewart (October 11, 2021). "Tropical Storm Pamela Discussion Number 6". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  156. ^ John Cangialosi (October 11, 2021). "Tropical Storm Pamela Discussion Number 6". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  157. ^ Stacy Stewart (October 12, 2021). "Tropical Storm Pamela Discussion Number 11". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  158. ^ Richard Pasch (October 13, 2021). "Hurricane Pamela Discussion Number 13". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 13, 2021.
  159. ^ Philippe Papin (October 13, 2021). "Hurricane Pamela Discussion Number 14". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 13, 2021.
  160. ^ https://www.elfinanciero.com.mx/estados/2021/10/13/huracan-pamela-desaparecen-3-servidores-publicos-y-1-civil-durante-labores-de-rescate-en-nayarit/
  161. ^ Richard Pasch (October 19, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 23, 2021.
  162. ^ Jack Beven (October 19, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 23, 2021.
  163. ^ Jack Beven (October 22, 2021). "Two Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 23, 2021.
  164. ^ Jack Beven (October 22, 2021). "Five Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 23, 2021.
  165. ^ Andrew Latto (October 22, 2021). "Tropical Depression Seventeen-E Discussion Number 1". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 23, 2021.
  166. ^ Andrew Latto; Richard Pasch (October 22, 2021). "Tropical Storm Rick Discussion Number 2". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 23, 2021.
  167. ^ Richard Pasch (October 23, 2021). "Hurricane Rick Discussion Number 5". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 23, 2021.
  168. ^ Daniel Brown (October 25, 2021). "Hurricane Rick Discussion Number 12". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 26, 2021.
  169. ^ Bob Henson; Jeff Masters (October 25, 2021). "Weather whiplash in California: extreme rains pound regions under exceptional drought". yaleclimateconnections.org. New Haven, Connecticut: Yale Climate Connections. Retrieved October 26, 2021.
  170. ^ Daniel Brown (October 25, 2021). "Hurricane Rick Tropical Cyclone Update". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 26, 2021.
  171. ^ Andrew Latto (October 25, 2021). "Tropical Depression Rick Discussion Number 14". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 26, 2021.
  172. ^ Stacy Stewart (October 26, 2021). "Remnants of Rick Discussion Number 15". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 26, 2021.
  173. ^ "Tropical Cyclone Names". www.nhc.noaa.gov. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. 2021. Retrieved May 10, 2021.
  174. ^ "WMO Hurricane Committee retires tropical cyclone names and ends the use of Greek alphabet". public.wmo.int. World Meteorological Organization. March 17, 2021. Retrieved March 17, 2021.
  175. ^ "Pacific Tropical Cyclone Names 2016–2021". Central Pacific Hurricane Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. May 12, 2016. Archived from the original (PHP) on December 30, 2016.
  176. ^ "Dolores se disipa en México tras dejar tres muertes por tormentas eléctricas". www.efe.com (in Spanish). Retrieved June 21, 2021.
  177. ^ "Tormenta tropical 'Dolores' deja un muerto a su paso por Jalisco". Noticieros Televisa (in Spanish). June 21, 2021. Retrieved June 21, 2021.
  178. ^ a b Global Catastrophe Recap June 2021 (PDF) (Report). Aon. July 9, 2021. Retrieved July 12, 2021.
  179. ^ Global Catastrophe Recap September 2021 (PDF) (Report). Aon Benfield. October 12, 2021. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  180. ^ "Huracán "Olaf" dejó daños estimados en 200 millones de pesos en BCS". El Heraldo de Mexico. September 21, 2021. Retrieved September 24, 2021.

External links[edit]