2022 French presidential election

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2022 French presidential election

← 2017 Between 8 and 23 April 2022 (first round)
Two weeks after the first round (second round)
2027 →
Opinion polls

Incumbent President

Emmanuel Macron
LREM



The first round of the 2022 French presidential election will be held between 8 and 23 April 2022, with the second round held two weeks after the first. Should no candidate win a majority of the vote in the first round, a runoff will be held between the top two candidates two weeks later. The incumbent president is Emmanuel Macron of La République En Marche! (LREM), who won the 2017 presidential election and whose term lasts until 13 May 2022.

Background[edit]

Under Article 7 of the Constitution of France, the President of the Republic is elected to a five-year term in a two-round election. If no candidate secures an absolute majority of votes in the first round, a second round is held two weeks later between the two candidates who received the most votes.[1] According to the Constitution of France, the first round of the presidential election must be held between 20 and 35 days before the transition of power at the end of the five-year term of the incumbent officeholder. As Emmanuel Macron took office on 14 May 2017, the transition of power is expected to take place on 13 May 2022. Correspondingly, the first round of the presidential election will be held between 8 and 23 April 2022, with the second round held two weeks after the first.[2]

To be listed on the first-round ballot, candidates need to secure 500 signatures (often referred to as parrainages in French) from national or local elected officials from at least 30 different departments or overseas collectivities, with no more than a tenth of these signatories from any single department.[3]

Campaign[edit]

Marine Le Pen, the president of the National Rally, announced on 16 January 2020 that she was running in the election. She previously ran in the 2012 presidential election and the 2017 presidential election as the candidate for the same party, then called the National Front. She came third in 2012 with 17.9% of the vote in the first round and second in 2017 with 21.3% of the vote in the first round and 33.9% of the vote in the second round. Le Pen was elected to the National Assembly in the 2017 legislative election.[4]

Jean Lassalle, who ran in the 2017 presidential election under the Résistons! banner, coming in seventh place with 1.2% of the vote, announced that he would run again if he was healthy enough and could raise funds.[5] In 2020, Joachim Son-Forget, a radiologist who was elected to the National Assembly for La République En Marche! in 2017, formed a new political party called Valeur absolue and announced his intention to enter the race for the presidency. He had resigned from the LREM group after posting tweets in 2018 that were deemed sexist; he joined the UDI and Independents group in 2019 before resigning his membership later that year.[6]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Candidate name
and political party
Political office(s)
Marine Le Pen (51)
National Rally
Marine Le Pen President of the National Rally
(since 2011)
Deputy for the 11th constituency of Pas-de-Calais
(since 2017)
MEP for North-West France
(2004–2017)
Jean Lassalle (65)
Résistons!
Jean Lassalle Deputy for the 4th constituency of Pyrénées-Atlantiques
(since 2002)
Mayor of Lourdios-Ichère
(1977–2017)
Joachim Son-Forget (37)
Valeur absolue
Joachim Son-Forget Deputy for the 6th constituency of French residents overseas
(since 2017)

Potential[edit]

Lutte Ouvrière[edit]

New Anticapitalist Party[edit]

La France Insoumise[edit]

French Communist Party[edit]

Génération.s[edit]

Socialist Party[edit]

In a document dated 17 October 2017, the Socialist Party (PS) noted that the financing of the 2022 presidential campaign was not assured despite "economic restructuring" but still planned to spend €12,000,000, the maximum permitted before the first round. According to the report, the leadership of the party seriously considered the possibility of not presenting a socialist candidate in 2022.[15]

Europe Écologie Les Verts[edit]

La République En Marche![edit]

Union of Democrats and Independents[edit]

Libres[edit]

The Republicans[edit]

Following the 2017 presidential election, The Republicans (LR) sent its members a questionnaire on the topic of the "refoundation" of the party; of the 40,000 respondents, 70% voted against an open primary to determine the party nominee.[24]

Debout la France[edit]

Popular Republican Union[edit]

Others[edit]

Declined[edit]

Opinion polls[edit]

First round[edit]

Opinion polling for the 2022 french presidential election.svg

From 28 October 2019 to present[edit]

Polling firm Fieldwork date Sample
size
Abs. Arthaud
LO
Poutou
NPA
Roussel
PCF
Mélenchon
LFI
Hamon
G·s
Faure
PS
Cazeneuve
PS
Jadot
EELV
Macron
LREM
Lagarde
UDI
Bertrand
LR
Baroin
LR
Pécresse
LR
Retailleau
LR
Dupont-Aignan
DLF
Le Pen
RN
Asselineau
UPR
Lassalle
R
Cheminade
S&P
Harris Interactive 2–3 Jul 2020 1,429 1% 3% 12% 3% 8% 28% 13% 6% 25% 1% <0.5%
1% 3% 12% 3% 8% 27% 14% 6% 25% 1% <0.5%
1% 3% 12% 3% 9% 28% 12% 6% 25% 1% <0.5%
1% 3% 13% 3% 8% 32% 6% 6% 27% 1% <0.5%
Elabe 30 Jun–1 Jul 2020 893 34% 0.5% 1.5% 12.5% 2.5% 8.5% 30% 11% 5% 27.5% 1%
33% 1% 1.5% 12.5% 9% 31% 12% 5.5% 26.5% 1%
32% 1% 2.5% 11.5% 2.5% 8.5% 31% 12% 5.5% 24.5% 1%
32% 1% 2% 12.5% 10% 31% 11% 5% 26.5% 1%
Ifop-Fiducial 18–19 Jun 2020 992 1% 0.5% 2% 11% 3% 8% 26% 0.5% 12% 5.5% 28% 0.5% 2% -
1% 0.5% 1% 12% 3% 8% 28% 0.5% 12% 5% 27% 0.5% 1.5% -
Ifop 28–30 Oct 2019 1,396 0.5% 1% 1.5% 11% 3% 8% 27% 1% 10% 6% 28% 1% 1% 0,5%
0.5% 1% 1.5% 11% 3% 9% 28% 1% 7% 7% 28% 1% 1.5% 0,5%
0.5% 1% 1.5% 11% 2.5% 7.5% 27% 1% 11% 6.5% 28% 1% 1.5% <0.5%
Elabe 28–29 Oct 2019 1,003 28% 1% 3% 13% 5% 6.5% 27% 9% 6% 28% 1.5%
29% 0.5% 3.5% 12.5% 5.5% 7% 29% 5% 6% 29% 2%
28% 0.5% 3% 13% 4.5% 6.5% 27.5% 9.5% 6.5% 27.5% 1.5%

13 October 2017 to 27 October 2019[edit]

Polling firm Fieldwork date Sample
size
Abs. Arthaud
LO
Poutou
NPA
Mélenchon
LFI
Hamon
G·s
Faure
PS
Jadot
EELV
Macron
LREM
Lagarde
UDI
Wauquiez
LR
Fillon
LR
Dupont-Aignan
DLF
Le Pen
RN
Asselineau
UPR
Lassalle
R
Cheminade
S&P
Ifop-Fiducial 27–28 May 2019 927 1% 1% 9% 4% 12% 30% 8% 5% 28% 1% 1% <0.5%
Ifop 1–2 Feb 2019 912 <0.5% 1% 12% 6% 3% 2% 30% 2% 8% 6% 27% 1% 2% <0.5%
Ifop 11–13 Dec 2018 1,125 1.5% 1% 13% 8.5% 27.5% 10% 7% 27.5% 1% 3% <0.5%
1% 1% 14% 8% 25% 13% 7% 27% 1% 3% <0.5%
Ifop-Fiducial 12–16 Apr 2018 1,131 0.5% 1% 16.5% 7% 36% 8% 6% 23% 1% 1% <0.5%
0.5% 1% 16.5% 6% 33% 12% 6% 23% 1% 1% <0.5%
Ifop 13–18 Oct 2017 1,908 1% 1.5% 18% 7% 28% 15% 5% 21.5% 1% 1.5% 0.5%
2017 election 23 Apr 2017 22.23% 0.64% 1.09% 19.58% 6.36% 24.01% 20.01% 4.70% 21.30% 0.92% 1.21% 0.18%

Second round[edit]

Polling firm Fieldwork date Sample
size
Abs. Macron
LREM
Le Pen
RN
Harris Interactive 2–3 Jul 2020 1,429 58% 42%
Elabe 30 Jun–1 Jul 2020 893 38% 58.5% 41.5%
Ifop-Fiducial 18–19 Jun 2020 992 55% 45%
Ifop 28–30 Oct 2019 1,396 55% 45%
Ifop-Fiducial 27–28 May 2019 927 57% 43%
Ifop 1–2 Feb 2019 912 56% 44%
2017 election 7 May 2017 25.44% 66.10% 33.90%

References[edit]

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