2022 Winter Olympics

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XXIV Olympic Winter Games
Polek balso berange.png
Beijing 2022 candidate logo
Host city Beijing, China
Motto A pure passion for ice and snow.
Chinese: 纯洁的冰雪 激情的约会
Nations participating 90 (estimated)
Events 102 in 7 sports (15 disciplines)
Opening ceremony 4 February
Closing ceremony 20 February
Stadium Beijing National Stadium

The XXIV Olympic Winter Games (Chinese: 第二十四届冬季奥林匹克运动会; pinyin: Dì Èrshísì Jiè Dōngjì Àolínpǐkè Yùndònghuì), also known as the 2022 Winter Olympics (French: XXIVe Jeux olympiques d'hiver),[1] is a multi-sport event to be organized in Beijing, China. It will be the third consecutive Olympic Games held in Asia, after Pyeongchang 2018 and Tokyo 2020. Having hosted the 2008 Summer Olympics, Beijing will be the first city ever to host both the Summer and Winter Olympics. It will also be the largest city to host the Winter Olympics, a distinction that was previously held by Vancouver, which hosted the 2010 Winter Olympics. The games will be held from 4–20 February 2022.[2]

It will be the first Olympic Winter Games ever to be held in China and the first since 1984 to be held in a Communist state. The estimated budget of the games is $3.9 billion, less than one tenth of the $43 billion spent on the 2008 Summer Olympics.[3]


The bidding calendar was announced by the IOC in October 2012, with the application deadline set for 14 November 2013. The IOC Executive Board reviewed the bids from all applicant cities on 7 July 2014, and selected Oslo (Norway), Almaty (Kazakhstan), and Beijing (China) as the final candidate cities. Oslo withdrew its bid on 1 October 2014, leaving Almaty and Beijing as the two remaining candidates. Beijing was selected as host city of the 2022 Winter Olympics after beating Almaty by 4 votes, on 31 July 2015, at the 128th IOC Session in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Voting results[edit]

2022 Winter Olympics bidding results
City Nation Votes
Beijing  China 44
Almaty  Kazakhstan 40


Location of the three Beijing 2022 clusters

The Beijing Olympic Games Bidding Committee unveiled the venue plan for the 2022 Winter Olympic Games on 20 February 2014: five ice events will be held at the Olympic center, the Capital Indoor Stadium and the Beijing Wukesong Sports Center, which were some of the main venues of the 2008 Summer Olympics. Competitions for luge, bobsleigh and alpine skiing will be held in Xiaohaituo Mountain area in Yanqing northwest of Beijing, 90 kilometres (56 miles) away from the city center using artificial snow given the rarity of natural snow in this region [4][5] All other skiing events will be held in Taizicheng Area in Chongli County, Zhangjiakou, within sight of the Great Wall,[6] 220 km (140 mi) from downtown Beijing and 130 km (81 mi) away from Xiaohaituo Mountain Area.[7]

Beijing Cluster[edit]

Olympic Green venues
Other venues

Yanqing Cluster[edit]

Zhangjiakou Cluster[edit]


The new Beijing-Zhangjiakou Intercity Railway will be built, starting from Beijing North Railway Station, and terminating at Zhangjiakou South Railway Station. It will be built for speeds up to 350 km/h (217 mph), and travel from Beijing to Zhangjiakou is estimated to take 50 minutes.

The Beijing Subway is expected to continue expanding and projected to have at least 24 lines by 2022. Expressway and highway networks are also expected to be upgraded.

A new second airport for Beijing and the region, tentatively known as Beijing Daxing International Airport, is expected to open by 2019.


Fifteen sports are scheduled in the 2022 Winter Olympics program. Skating will include three disciplines – figure skating, speed skating and short track speed skating – while skiing will be represented by six disciplines – alpine skiing, cross-country skiing, freestyle skiing, Nordic combined, ski jumping and snowboarding. Bobsleigh events will be contested in both bobsleigh and skeleton disciplines. The remaining four sports are biathlon, curling, ice hockey and luge.


Broadcast rights to the 2022 Winter Olympics in some countries were already sold as part of long-term broadcast rights deals. In France and the United Kingdom, the 2022 Winter Olympics will be the first that are subject to the exclusive pan-European rights held by Discovery Communications that last between 2018 and 2024. In the United Kingdom, to comply with anti-siphoning laws, Discovery will be required to sub-license coverage to a terrestrial network, such as former rightsholder BBC.[8]

Concerns and controversies[edit]

Several cities withdrew their applications during the bidding process, citing the high costs or the lack of local support to host the 2022 games, leaving Almaty and Beijing as the only candidate cities by 1 October 2014.[18]

The decision to bid for the Olympics was controversial in China (and outside) because Beijing itself, and especially some of the proposed outdoor venues, do not have reliable snowfall in winter for snow sports. Concerns have been raised that snow may need to be transported to the venues at great cost and with uncertain environmental consequences.[19][20]

The environmental impact of hosting the games near Beijing has been questioned. Some of the proposed venues will be adjacent to the Beijing Songshan National Nature Reserve and part of the same mountain system, and the environmental impact on the nature reserve of construction, and artificially covering parts of the mountain with snow, is uncertain.[21][22] The Chinese government responded to these concerns by expanding the adjacent Beijing Songshan National Nature Reserve to 131% of its original size.[23]

See also[edit]


  1. ^ "French and English are the official languages for the Olympic Games."
  2. ^ "Beijing to host 2022 Winter Olympics and Paralympics". BBC Sport. Retrieved 31 July 2015. 
  3. ^ "Beijing won't have a big budget for the 2022 Winter Olympics". CNNMoney. 
  4. ^ Phillips, Tom (31 July 2015). "Beijing promises to overcome lack of snow for 2022 Winter Olympics". The Guardian. Retrieved 3 August 2015. 
  5. ^ Mills, Chris (1 August 2015). "Here's the 2022 Winter Olympics Venue, In The Middle of Winter". Retrieved 3 August 2015. 
  6. ^ Livingstone, Robert (26 March 2015). "Beijing 2022 Athletes Will Compete in the Shadow of the Great Wall of China". gamesbid.com. Retrieved 3 August 2015. 
  7. ^ "Beijing announces gym layout for 2022 Winter Olympics". People's Daily Online. 20 February 2014. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  8. ^ "BBC dealt another blow after losing control of TV rights for Olympics". The Guardian. Retrieved 30 June 2015. 
  9. ^ "IOC awards 2018–2024 broadcast rights in Asia". International Olympic Committee (Olympic.org). 29 July 2015. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  10. ^ "IOC awards 2022-2024 broadcast rights in Canada to CBC/Radio-Canada". International Olympic Committee (Olympic.org). 21 October 2015. Retrieved 21 October 2015. 
  11. ^ "TSN, RDS to broadcast 2022 and 2024 Olympic Games". TSN. 21 October 2015. Retrieved 21 October 2015. 
  12. ^ "IOC awards 2018–2024 broadcast rights in China". International Olympic Committee (Olympic.org). 4 December 2014. Retrieved 4 December 2014. 
  13. ^ "IOC awards all TV and multiplatform broadcast rights in Europe to Discovery and Eurosport for 2018–2024 Olympic Games". International Olympic Committee (Olympic.org). 29 June 2015. Retrieved 29 June 2015. 
  14. ^ "IOC awards 2018–2024 broadcast rights in Japan". International Olympic Committee (Olympic.org). 19 June 2014. Retrieved 19 June 2014. 
  15. ^ "IOC awards 2018–2024 broadcast rights in Middle East and North Africa". International Olympic Committee (Olympic.org). 27 July 2015. Retrieved 27 July 2015. 
  16. ^ a b "IOC awards SBS broadcast rights for 2018, 2020, 2022 and 2024 Olympic Games". Olympic.org. 4 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-08-18. 
  17. ^ "IOC awards Olympic Games broadcast rights to NBCUniversal through to 2032". Olympic.org. 7 May 2014. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  18. ^ Abend, Lisa (3 October 2014). "Why Nobody Wants to Host the 2022 Winter Olympics". time.com. Time (magazine). Retrieved 19 September 2015. 
  19. ^ Matt Schiavenza, "A Winter Olympics in a City Without Snow", The Atlantic, 31 July 2015
  20. ^ Tom Phillips, "Beijing promises to overcome lack of snow for 2022 Winter Olympics", The Guardian, 31 July 2015
  21. ^ "Scientists Question Environmental Impact of China's Winter Olympics", New York Times, 9 April 2015
  22. ^ "Winter Olympic Games venues in China 'pose threat to Beijing nature reserve'", South China Morning Post, 4 August 2015
  23. ^ "2022 Beijing Winter Olympics". birdingbeijing.com. Retrieved 15 November 2015. 
Preceded by
Winter Olympics

XXIV Olympic Winter Games (2022)
Succeeded by