2060s

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Millennium: 3rd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

The 2060s (pronounced "twenty-sixties") is a decade of the Gregorian calendar that will begin on January 1, 2060, and will end on December 31, 2069.

Time capsules[edit]

Predictions[edit]

2060[edit]

2061[edit]

2065[edit]

  • November 11 – Transit of Mercury
  • November 22 12:45 UTC — Venus will occult Jupiter. It will be very difficult to observe from Earth, because the elongation of Venus and Jupiter from the Sun at this time will be only 7 degrees. This event will be the first occultation of a planet by another since January 3, 1818; however the next will occur less than two years later, on July 15, 2067.

2066[edit]

  • The UK is projected to have at least half a million people aged over 100.[3]

2067[edit]

  • February 15 – Assuming no further extensions to the term of copyrights become law in the interim, all sound recordings fixed before February 15, 1972, will enter the public domain in the U.S.[4]
  • July 15 11:56 UTC — Mercury will occult Neptune. This rare event will be very difficult to observe from Earth.
  • October – A METI message Cosmic Call 1 sent from the 70-meter Eupatoria Planetary Radar arrives at its destination, star HD 178428.

2068[edit]

  • The Helium Centennial Time Columns Monument is expected to be opened 100 years after the time capsule was locked in 1968.
  • According to futurist David Passig, there will be an undersea city by 2068.

2069[edit]

Religious and spiritual speculation[edit]

2060[edit]

  • Isaac Newton predicted that the world, according to his interpretation of the Bible, would end no sooner than 2060.[5][6]

2062[edit]

Fictional references[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "News Highlights | Media Centre | World Future Energy Summit 2014 | 20 - 22 January 2014 | Abu Dhabi". 
  2. ^ "Moon mine 'could start in 50 years'". BBC News. January 2, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Young people 'more likely to reach 100 years old'". BBC News. August 4, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Copyright Term and the Public Domain in the United States, 1 January 2011". Cornell Law School. Retrieved September 15, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Newton and Socinianism". Isaac Newton. 
  6. ^ "Newton set 2060 for end of world". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on October 20, 2007. 
  7. ^ Rudhyar, Dane Astrological Timing: The Transition to the New Age New York: 1972 Harper & Row