2062 Aten

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2062 Aten
Aten Sept 11 2013.png
Orbital diagram of the Aten asteroid (epoch: Sept. 2013)
Discovery
Discovered by Eleanor F. Helin
Discovery site Palomar
Discovery date 7 January 1976
Designations
Named after
Aten
1976 AA
Aten asteroid
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 December 2011 (JD 2455926.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 59.14 yr (21601 days)
Aphelion 1.1434 AU (171.05 Gm)
Perihelion 0.79014 AU (118.203 Gm)
0.96679 AU (144.630 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.18272
0.95 yr (347.2 d)
30.04 km/s
172.27°
1.0368°/day
Inclination 18.934°
108.60°
148.04°
Earth MOID 0.113146 AU (16.9264 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 3.91861 AU (586.216 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 6.184
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 1.1 km (0.68 mi)[1]
Mean radius
0.55 km
Mass 7.6×1011 kg
Mean density
2 ? g/cm³
Equatorial surface gravity
0.000 25 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.000 48 km/s
40.77 h (1.699 d) hr[1]
0.26[1]
Surface temp. min mean max
Kelvin[2] 242 K 263 K 291 K
Celsius -31°C -10°C 18°C
Fahrenheit -23.8°F 14°F 64.4°F
S[1]
16.80[1]

2062 Aten (/ˈɑːtən/)[3] is an asteroid that was discovered at the Palomar Mountain Observatory by Eleanor F. Helin, who was the principal scientist for the NEAT (Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking) project until she retired in 2002. It is named after Aten, the Egyptian god of the solar disk.

Aten was the first asteroid found to have a semi-major orbital axis of less than one astronomical unit. A new category of asteroids was thus created, the Atens. As of July 2004 about 16 Atens were numbered and some 212 were provisional,[4] the unnumbered Atens ranged from what was then 1989 VA to 2004 MD6.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2062 Aten (1976 AA)" (2014-02-14 last obs (arc=58 yr)). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 17 April 2016. 
  2. ^ "Planetary Habitability Calculators". Planetary Habitability Laboratory. University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo. Retrieved 10 December 2015. 
  3. ^ Oxford English Dictionary
  4. ^ "NEO Discovery Statistics". Retrieved 2014-02-26. 

External links[edit]