2064 Thomsen

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
2064 Thomsen
Discovery [1]
Discovered by L. Oterma
Discovery site Turku Observatory
Discovery date 8 September 1942
Designations
MPC designation 2064 Thomsen
Named after
Ivan Leslie Thomsen
(astronomer)[2]
1942 RQ · 1958 RO
1974 OK · 1977 FE3
1977 KA · A913 QB
Mars-crosser[1][3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 73.53 yr (26857 days)
Aphelion 2.8964 AU (433.30 Gm)
Perihelion 1.4605 AU (218.49 Gm)
2.1785 AU (325.90 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.32956
3.22 yr (1174.4 d)
318.36°
0° 18m 23.508s / day
Inclination 5.6941°
302.17°
2.7643°
Earth MOID 0.443552 AU (66.3544 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.35921 AU (352.933 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.604
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 13.61 km[4]
8.09±0.12 km[5]
13.59 km (derived)[3]
Mean radius
6.805 ± 0.8 km
4.233 h (0.1764 d)[1][6]
4.2267±0.0001 h[7]
4.253±0.005 h[8]
0.0549 ± 0.015[1][4]
0.162±0.006[5]
0.0644 (derived)[3]
B–V = 0.887
U–B = 0.524
SMASS = SS[3]
12.5

2064 Thomsen, provisional designation 1942 RQ, is a stony, eccentric asteroid classified as Mars-crosser, about 14 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by Finnish female astronomer Liisi Oterma at Turku Observatory, Finland on 8 September 1942.[9]

The S-type asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.5–2.9 AU once every 3.22 years (1,175 days). Its orbit shows an eccentricity of 0.33 and is tilted by 6 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic. It has a rotation period of 4.233 hours[6][7]
[8] and an albedo of 0.055 and 0.16, as measured by the IRAS and Akari surveys, respectively.[4][5]

It was named in memory of New Zealand astronomer Ivan Leslie Thomsen (1910–1969), director of the Carter Observatory, Wellington, from 1945 until he was appointed director of the Mount John University Observatory only two months before his death. He was an enthusiastic coordinator of New Zealand's astronomy and his efforts eventually led to the minor-planet observing program with the Carter Observatory 41-cm reflector. It was the 1977 rediscovery at the Carter Observatory that allowed this minor planet to be numbered.[2]

The asteroid approached Mars within a distances of 15 million kilometers in 2103.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2064 Thomsen (1942 RQ)" (2015-06-11 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 17 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (2064) Thomsen. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 167. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved November 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (2064) Thomsen". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved November 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved November 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved November 2015. 
  6. ^ a b Wisniewski, W. Z. (March 1991). "Physical studies of small asteroids. I - Lightcurves and taxonomy of 10 asteroids". Icarus: 117–122. Bibcode:1991Icar...90..117W. doi:10.1016/0019-1035(91)90073-3. ISSN 0019-1035. Retrieved November 2015. 
  7. ^ a b Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (2064) Thomsen". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved November 2015. 
  8. ^ a b Warner, Brian D. (July 2015). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2014 December - 2015 March". The Minor Planet Bulletin 42 (3): 167–172. Bibcode:2015MPBu...42..167W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved November 2015. 
  9. ^ "2064 Thomsen (1942 RQ)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved November 2015. 

External links[edit]